Social Science Writing Project

  • Welcome to the Social Science Writing Project

Student Workshops

Tuesdays and Fridays from 12:30-2:00PM in Sierra Hall 181

This workshop series begins September 25, 2018.

Communication services (sign language interpreters, note takers, real-time captionists, or assistive listening devices) are available for this event. Requests for services must be submitted at least five (5) working days in advance. Please contact The Social Science Writing Project at (818) 677-5450 or .

Fall 2018 Student Workshops

Using MS Word to Organize Papers and Citations

Tuesday, Sept. 25: 12:30-2 p.m.
Friday, Sept. 28: 12:30-2 p.m.
Steve Graves

Using MS Word to Organize Papers and Citations

This workshop will introduce students to several functions in Microsoft Word that are helpful when organizing ideas and citations. In the first part of the workshop, students will learn how to use MS Word's outlining toolkit to arrange and re-arrange the sections, sub-sections, and paragraphs of a paper so that they flow in a logical sequence. Students will also work to create topic sentences for each paragraph that appears in the outline. The second half of the workshop will introduce students to the citation tool in MS Word. Students will practice using reference tools to insert citations, create a bibliography, and build a personal, digital inventory of books, articles, and other references for future use.

Writing the Basic Paragraph

Tuesday, Oct. 2: 12:30-2 p.m.
Friday, Oct. 5: 12:30-2p.m.
Jeffrey Auerbach

Writing the Basic Paragraph

In this workshop, students will practice writing the basic, expository paragraph. Students will work with a sample text and a series of worksheets that will help them to break the elements of a paragraph they will write summarizing the text into component parts. Students will then write out, in turn, each element of a paragraph, before then tying the various pieces together into a seamless whole.

The Comma

Tuesday, Oct. 23: 12:30-2 p.m.
Friday, Oct. 26: 12:30-2 p.m.
Miriam Neirick

The Comma

Participants in this workshop will undertake an inductive study of the rules that govern the use of commas. First we'll work to punctuate passages of text from which commas have been removed. We’ll then compare those guesses with the original text, making observations about how commas are used in each instance, thinking about why they are used, and attempting to formulate the rules that dictate their usage. Students will be encouraged to make observations about the use of commas in everything they read and to apply those patterns to their own writing, rather than simply memorizing complicated and abstract punctuation rules that writers at every level struggle to master.

Concision and Precision in Social Science Writing

Tuesday, Nov. 6: 12:30-2 p.m.
Friday, Nov. 9: 12:30-2 p.m.
Tara Fahmie

Concision and Precision in Social Science Writing

This workshop will include tutorials and practice opportunities, disguised as games, to teach concision and precision in writing. With a few essential lessons in style, participants will learn to make each sentence the best version of itself.

Writing an Effective Thesis Statement

Friday, Nov. 16:  12:30-2 p.m.
Tuesday, Nov. 20:  12:30- 2 p.m.
Patricia Juarez-Dappe

Writing an Effective Thesis Statement

Creating a thesis statement is one of the most difficult parts of essay writing. In this workshop, participants will learn what a thesis statement is, how it works in their writing, and how to craft a strong argument for a research assignment. This is a hands-on session that will require students to read various sources and formulate a thesis statement. It will also provide students with a thesis statement tool kit that they can use to assess their own work in the future. Finally, for those students who are already working on research essays for class assignments, this session will offer an opportunity to discuss their thesis statements and obtain feedback.