CTVA

  • Buster Keaton

Cassavetes Television

Thursday, February 9, 2017 - 7:00pm

Location:
Armer Theater (MZ100)
Cost:
Free. Doors open at 6:45 p.m.

Johnny Staccato poster

John Cassavetes Retrospective

Cassavetes Television

(1956-1965), 120 mins. 

Cassavetes played bit-parts in B-pictures and in television serials, until gaining notoriety in 1955 as a vicious killer in The Night Holds Terror, and as a juvenile delinquent in the live TV drama Crime in the Streets. Cassavetes guest-starred in Beverly Garland's groundbreaking crime drama, Decoy, about a New York City woman police undercover detective. Thereafter, he played Johnny Staccato, the title character in a television series about a jazz pianist who also worked as a private detective. In total he directed five episodes of the series, which also features a guest appearance by his wife Gena Rowlands. It was broadcast on NBC between September 1959 and March 1960 when it was acquired by ABC and although critically acclaimed, the series was cancelled in September 1960. Cassavetes would appear on the NBC interview program, Here's Hollywood.

He also starred in the CBS western series Rawhide, in the episode, "Incident Near Gloomy River" (1961). In the 1962–1963 season, Cassavetes guest-starred on the CBS anthology series, The Lloyd Bridges Show, and directed two episodes, including "A Pair of Boots", in which his friend, Seymour Cassel, guest-starred. In the 1963–1964 season, Cassavetes appeared in Jason Evers's ABC drama about college life, Channing. That same season he was cast in the ABC medical drama about psychiatry, Breaking Point. In 1965, he appeared on ABC's western series, The Legend of Jesse James. The same year he also guest-starred in the World War II series, Combat!, in the episode "S.I.W." as well as insane Nuclear Scientist Everett Lang in Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea Season 2 Episode "The Peacemaker".

Cassavetes also starred in a 1972 episode of the TV crime series Columbo. The episode was entitled "Étude in Black," and Cassavetes played the role of the murderer. (wikipedia.com)