Marilyn Magaram Center

Panzanella Salad

Ingredients:

  • 1 2/2 lbs Mixed Tomatoes, cut into bite-sized pieces
  • 2 tsp Kosher Salt
  • 3/4 Ciabatta or Rustic Sourdough Bread, cut into 1.5-inch cubes (about 6 cups)
  • 10 tbsp Extra Virgin Olive Oil
  • 1 Small Shallot, minced
  • 1/2 tsp Dijon Mustard
  • 2 tbsp White or Red Wine Vinegar
  • 1/2 cup Packed Basil Leaves, roughly chopped
  • Salt and Pepper to taste

Method:

PREPARE

Place tomatoes in a colander set over a bowl and season with 2 teaspoons of kosher salt. Toss to Coat. Set aside at room temperature to drain, tossing occasionally, for 15 minutes. 

Preheat oven 10 350° and adjust rack to center position.  Toss bread cubes with 2 tbsp olive oil, then transfer to a rimmed baking sheet. 
Bake until crisp and firm, not browned, about 15 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool.

Remove colander with tomatoes from bowl.  Place colander with tomatoes in the sink. Reserve bowl with tomato juice.

DRESSING
Add shallot, garlic, mustard, and vinegar to the bowl of tomato juice.  Whisking constantly, drizzle in the remaining 1/2 cup olive oil.  Season dressing to taste with salt and pepper.

COMBINE
Combine toasted bread, tomatoes, and dressing in a large bowl. Add basil leaves. Toss everything to coat and season with salt and pepper.

Let rest for 30 minutes before serving, tossing occasionally until dressing is completely absorbed by the bread.

Serve and enjoy!

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION

PER SERVING | RECIPE SERVES 6

CALORIES 360 | FAT 24 G | FIBER 3 G
PROTEIN 6 G |CARB 32G | SUGARS 5G
CALCIUM 29 MG | SODIUM 800 MG|
POTASSIUM 47 MG | IRON 2 MG

 To download this recipe, click here: Panzanella SaladPDF icon 

FUN FACTS:

  • Extra virgin olive oil is full of heart-healthy fat and antioxidants that last longer when you store your olive oil in a cool, dark place or the refrigerator with the cap closed tightly.
  • To reduce food waste, older stale bread can be used in place of fresh bread; soak the toasted pieces in the vinaigrette to rehydrate it.
  • By weight, all types of salt have the same amount of sodium. But by the teaspoon, because kosher salt is coarse with large crystals, less fits in the spoon, so technically it is a lower sodium option.