Physical Therapy

  • CSUN PT Gait Lab, PT Students in Nicaragua and in Vietnam

    Department of Physical Therapy

  • ECLIPSE 2016

    ECLIPSE 2016

  • 2017 Campanella/Dodgers Scholarship Recipients

    2017 Campanella/Dodgers Scholarship Recipients

  • 2017 Dee Lilly Scholarship Recipients

    2017 Dee Lilly Scholarship Recipients

  • 2017 Campanella/Dodgers Scholarship Recipients at Dodger Game

    2017 Campanella/Dodgers Scholarship event at Dodgers Stadium

Program Prerequisites

Prerequisite Requirements:

I.    Bachelor’s degree (any major)

II.   10 Prerequisite courses (listed below)

III.  GRE (Analytical, Verbal, & Quantitative)

IV.   200 PT hours are required – under a  licensed physical therapist

V.    3 letters of recommendation – at least 1 from a  licensed physical therapist

  • Only 2 courses may be planned or in progress by the application deadline – no exceptions.
  • A minimum 3.0 Prerequisite GPA.
  • A minimum grade of a “C” or higher in all courses.
  • Send all transcripts to PTCAS; NO transcripts should be sent directly to the department.

Courses can be taken at any accredited university, community college and/or extended learning institution.  Online Courses are accepted. 

No Time Limit placed on any of the prerequisite courses i.e. courses may have been taken 10 years ago.

AP Courses are accepted as long as it is on your official transcript. Pass/Fail designations are given a grade of “C” or “F”. 

Repeating Courses is acceptable to help increase your prerequisite GPA.  If you are repeating the same exact course, PTCAS will average the grades.  You may take a different course in the same subject area to avoid an averaged grade. As long as the course meets our requirement description, we will accept it.  For example, if you took Bio 101 and received a “C” grade, you may take Bio 106 instead since we accept any Biology course.

Please Note: To find out if the class you took would be accepted, please see Requirement Description information listed below.

Course SubjectLabUnitsExample CoursesRequirement Description
Biology+Lab

Semester: 4

Quarter: 5

Introductory Biology

General Biology

Microbiology

Any Biology course with a lab is acceptable.

 

Anatomy+Lab

Semester: 3

Quarter: 4

Human Anatomy

Animal or Mammalian Anatomy

A&P: Separate

A&P: Combined

Any Human or Animal Anatomy with a lab is acceptable. A human cadaver lab is recommended.

If Anatomy and Physiology are combined, the course must be 2 semesters (8 semester units or 10 quarter units). If only one semester of a combined course is taken it will count as only Physiology.

Physiology+Lab

Semester: 4

Quarter: 5

Human Physiology

Animal or Mammalian Anatomy

Any Human or Animal Physiology with a lab is acceptable. Exercise Physiology is not accepted.
Chemistry I+Lab

Semester: 4

Quarter: 5

General Chemistry I

Biochemistry

Inorganic Chemistry

Organic Chemistry

Chemistry course with a lab. Introductory Chemistry courses are not accepted.
Chemistry II+Lab

Semester: 4

Quarter: 5

General Chemistry II

Biochemistry

Inorganic Chemistry

Organic Chemistry

2nd Chemistry course with a lab. Introductory Chemistry courses are not accepted.
Physics I+Lab

Semester: 4

Quarter: 5

General Physics I

Physics I

College Physics I

Physics courses must be directed towards the science major, allied health profession, etc., and must have a lab component for consideration.

Courses for non-science majors will not be considered.

Algebra or Calculus based physics are acceptable. Introductory Physics courses are NOT accepted.

Physics II+Lab

Semester: 4

Quarter: 5

General Physics II

Physics II

2nd Physics course with a lab. Introductory Physics courses are not accepted.
StatisticsN/A

Semester: 3

Quarter: 4

Math: Statistics

Biology: Biostatistics

Psychology: Statistics

Business: Statistics

Any statistics course is acceptable.
Psychology IN/A

Semester: 3

Quarter: 4

General Psychology

Introduction to Psychology

Any Psychology course is acceptable.

Psychology II

(higher level/ specialized)

N/A

Semester: 3

Quarter: 4

Abnormal Psychology

Developmental Psychology

Psychopathology

Adolescent Psychology

Lifespan Psychology

2nd Psychology course. Upper Division. Developmental or Specialized Psychology courses only. A second Introductory or General Psychology will not be accepted.

Abnormal Psychology or Psychopathology is highly recommended.

Kinesiology courses will not be substituted for a Psychology II prerequisite.

For additional information:

www.csun.edu/health-human-development/physical-therapy/program-prerequisites

Click on Application Requirements on the left hand side, and it will direct you to the PTCAS Website.

REQUIREMENT DESCRIPTION

Biology + lab

REQUIREMENT DESCRIPTION

Any Biology course with a lab is acceptable

Semester units: 4

Quarter units: 5

If the course description listed below is similar to the course you took then we would likely accept that course

BIOL 100. Introductory Biology (3) *Lab below

Analysis of selected topics illustrating major biological concepts, including ecology, evolution, heredity and organismal and cellular structure and physiology. Primarily designed for non-science majors. Lecture 3 hours.

BIOL 100L. Introductory Biology Lab (1)

Observations, experiments, demonstrations and required field trips to augment Introductory Biology. Emphasis on the methods of science, basic biological principles, the natural environment and the effects of human activity on the environment. Lab 3 hours.

BIOL 101/L. General Biology and Lab (3/1)

Analysis of selected topics illustrating major concepts in biology, including evolution, environmental relationships, heredity, the cell, energetics and functions of living systems, and development. Available for General Education, Natural Sciences, if required in the major. Lecture 3 hours, lab 3 hours. (Available for General Education, Natural Sciences if required by student’s major.)

BIOL 215/L. Introductory Microbiology and Lab (2/2)

Introduction to the biology of major groups of microorganisms, including their role in infectious diseases, their role in nature and their relationship to humankind. Lecture 2 hours, lab 6 hours.

 

Human Anatomy + lab

REQUIREMENT DESCRIPTION

Any Human Anatomy with a lab is acceptable.

A human cadaver lab is recommended.

If Anatomy and Physiology are combined, the course must be 2 semesters (8 semester units or 10 quarter units). If only one semester of a combined course is taken it will count as only Physiology.

Semester units: 3

Quarter units: 4

If the course description listed below were similar to the course you took then we would most likely accept that course

BIOL 211. Human Anatomy (2)

Survey of the gross anatomy and histology of the major human organ systems, including the muscle, skeletal, digestive, circulatory, respiratory, excretory, endocrine and reproductive systems. Lecture 2 hours.

BIOL 212. Laboratory Studies in Human Anatomy (1)

Examination of the anatomy and histology of the major organ systems by dissection and microscopic study. Lab 3 hours.

Human Physiology + lab

REQUIREMENT DESCRIPTION

Any Human Physiology with a lab is acceptable.  Exercise Physiology is NOT accepted.

Semester units: 4

Quarter units: 5

If the course description listed below were similar to the course you took then we would most likely accept that course

BIOL 281. Human Physiology (3)

Survey of the physiology of nerve and muscle, as well as the digestive, circulatory, respiratory, excretory, endocrine and reproductive systems. Lecture 3 hours.

BIOL 282. Lab Experiments in Human Physiology (1)

Selected lab experiments in human physiology. Lab 3 hours.

 

Chemistry I + lab

REQUIREMENT DESCRIPTION

Chemistry course with a lab.   

Introductory Chemistry courses are NOT accepted.

At least 2 semester or 3 quarter courses are required to meet the requirement.

Semester units: 4

Quarter units: 5

If the course description listed below were similar to the course you took then we would most likely accept that course

CHEM 101/L. General Chemistry I and Lab (4/1)

Basic course in the fundamental principles and theories with special emphasis on chemical calculations. Includes a discussion of the kinetic molecular theory, atomic structures, the periodic table, solutions and oxidation-reduction. Recitation portion deals with problem solving, review of the lecture material and quizzes. Lab section emphasizes basic lab skills, quantitative relationships in chemistry and inorganic preparative procedures. Completion of CHEM 101/L satisfies General Education Natural Sciences, including the corresponding lab requirement. 3 hours lecture; 1 hour recitation per week; one 3-hour lab per week.

CHEM 461/L. Biochemistry I and Lab (3/1)

The first part of a two-semester biochemistry lecture series designed for biochemistry majors that includes study of protein structure and function, enzyme mechanisms, biological membranes, carbohydrate metabolism, ATP generation and lipid metabolism. Lab includes experiments involving acid/base chemistry, peptide analysis, spectrophotometric analysis, protein isolation and characterization, and enzyme kinetics. 3 hours lecture per week; one 3-hour lab per week.

CHEM 401. Inorganic Chemistry (3) *Lab below

Principles of chemical bonding and molecular structure; survey of the chemistry of the elements of the periodic system. 3 hours lecture per week.

CHEM 401L. Inorganic Chemistry Lab (1)

Synthesis and characterization of inorganic and organometallic compounds. Synthetic techniques important to inorganic chemistry, such as electrochemical synthesis, autoclave reactions and inert atmosphere techniques, as well as inorganic spectroscopic techniques. One 3-hour lab per week.

CHEM 333/L. Organic Chemistry I and Lab (4/1)

The study of the structure and properties of organic molecules with special emphasis on functional groups and their reactions. Attention given to the mechanisms of organic reactions and the spectroscopic techniques used to determine the structure of organic molecules. Lab: An introduction to the techniques of synthesis, purification and characterization of organic compounds. 3 hours lecture, 1-hour discussion per week, and one 3-hour lab per week.

Chemistry II + lab

REQUIREMENT DESCRIPTION

2nd Chemistry course with a lab.

Introductory Chemistry courses are NOT accepted.

At least 2 semester or 3 quarter courses are required to meet the requirement.

Semester units: 4

Quarter units: 5

If the course description listed below were similar to the course you took then we would most likely accept that course

CHEM 102/L. General Chemistry II and Lab (4/1)

Continuation of CHEM 101. Introduction to kinetics, gas phase and solution equilibria, electrochemistry, chemical thermodynamics, radio, organic chemistry and the descriptive chemistry of the more familiar metals and nonmetals. Recitation portion deals with problem solving, review of the lecture material and quizzes. Lab section consists of experiments dealing with kinetics, acid-base and solubility equilibria, selected reactions of metals and nonmetals, and qualitative elemental analysis. Completion of CHEM 102/L satisfies General Education, Natural Sciences, including the corresponding lab requirement. 3 hours lecture; 1 hour recitation per week; one 3-hour lab per week.

CHEM 462/L. Biochemistry II and Lab (3/1)

Continuation of CHEM 461, the second part of a two-semester biochemistry lecture series designed for biochemistry majors, including discussion of photosynthesis, amino acid metabolism, lipoproteins, metabolic interrelationships and regulation, information transfer and signal transduction. Lab includes experiments involving gel filtration, ATP biosynthesis, isolation and characterization of phospholipids, reactions of lipolytic enzymes, mitochondrial dehydrogenases, isolation of DNA, study of restriction enzymes and polymerase chain reaction. 3 hours lecture per week; one 3-hour lab per week.

CHEM 401. Inorganic Chemistry (3) *Lab below

Principles of chemical bonding and molecular structure; survey of the chemistry of the elements of the periodic system. 3 hours lecture per week.

CHEM 401L. Inorganic Chemistry Lab (1)

Synthesis and characterization of inorganic and organometallic compounds. Synthetic techniques important to inorganic chemistry, such as electrochemical synthesis, autoclave reactions and inert atmosphere techniques, as well as inorganic spectroscopic techniques. One 3-hour lab per week.

CHEM 334/L. Organic Chemistry II and Lab (3/1)

Continuation of CHEM 333, with an emphasis on mechanisms of organic reactions and synthesis. Attention given to representative compounds of interest in biology and medicine. Lab: Exposure to reactions common in chemical synthesis, including arene substitution, transformations of carbonyl compounds, the Diels-Alder reaction and polymer synthesis. 3 hours lecture per week; one 3-hour lab per week.

Physics I + lab

REQUIREMENT DESCRIPTION

Physics courses must be directed towards the science major, allied health profession, etc., and must have a lab component for consideration.

Courses for non-science majors will not be considered.

Algebra or Calculus based physics are acceptable. 

Standalone Introductory Physics courses are NOT accepted.

At least 2 semester or 3 quarter courses are mandatory to meet the requirement.

Semester units: 4

Quarter units: 5

If the course description listed below were similar to the course you took then we would most likely accept that course

PHYS 100A. General Physics I (3) *Lab below

Introductory course in physics. Topics covered include mechanics, heat and sound. (Students using this course to satisfy the Natural Sciences requirement in General Education may satisfy the corresponding lab requirement by completing course PHYS 100AL.)

PHYS 100AL. General Physics I Lab (1)

3 hours per week. (May be used to satisfy the lab requirement in Natural Sciences, General Education, provided PHYS 100A also is completed.)

PHYS 225. Physics I (4) *Lab below

First course of a sequence intended primarily for physical science majors. Calculus-based course on mechanics, fluids, waves and acoustics.

PHYS 220AL. Mechanics Lab (1)

Prerequisite: MATH 150A or MATH 255A. Recommended Corequisite or Preparatory: MATH 150B or MATH 255B and PHYS 220A or PHYS 225. 3 hours per week. (May be used to satisfy the lab requirement in Natural Sciences, General Education, provided PHYS 220A or PHYS 225 also is completed.)

PHYS 220A. Mechanics (3) *Lab below

Dynamics and statics of particles and rigid bodies, harmonic vibrations and fluid mechanics. (Students using this course to satisfy the Natural Sciences requirement in General Education may satisfy the corresponding lab requirement by completing course PHYS 220AL.)

PHYS 220AL. Mechanics Lab (1)

Prerequisite: MATH 150A or MATH 255A. Recommended Co-requisite or Preparatory: MATH 150B or MATH 255B and PHYS 220A or PHYS 225. 3 hours per week. (May be used to satisfy the lab requirement in Natural Sciences, General Education, provided PHYS 220A or PHYS 225 also is completed.)

Sample of an acceptable 3 series Introduction (UCSB)

All courses must have an accompanied lab

PHYS 6A. Introductory Physics (3)

Prerequisite: Mathematics 3A or 34A (may be taken concurrently).

Presents concepts and methodologies for understanding physical phenomena, and is particularly useful preparation for upper-division study in the life sciences. Vectors, velocity, acceleration. Newton's laws. Work and energy. Linear momentum. Gravity. Static equilibrium. Rotational motion. Angular momentum.

PHYS 6AL. Introductory Experimental Physics (1)

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Physics 6A.

Self directed laboratory course where students seek to discover simple mathematical descriptions of laws governing various physical phenomena. Each student is responsible for deciding what to measure, how to measure it, and what interpretation can be placed on the results.

Physics II + lab

REQUIREMENT DESCRIPTION

2nd  Physics course with a lab. Physics courses must be directed towards the science major, allied health profession, etc., and must have a lab component for consideration.

Courses for non-science majors will not be considered.

Algebra or Calculus based physics are acceptable. 

Standalone Introductory Physics courses are NOT accepted.

At least 2 semester or 3 quarter courses are mandatory to meet the requirement.

Semester units: 4

Quarter units: 5

If the course description listed below were similar to the course you took then we would most likely accept that course

PHYS 100B. General Physics II (3) *Lab below

Continuation of PHYS 100A. Topics covered include electricity and magnetism, light, and modern physics. (Students using this course to satisfy the Natural Sciences requirement in General Education may satisfy the corresponding lab requirement by completing course PHYS 100BL.)

PHYS 100BL. General Physics II Lab (1)

3 hours per week. (May be used to satisfy the lab requirement in Natural Sciences, General Education, provided PHYS 100B also is completed.)

PHYS 226. Physics II (4) *Lab below

Second course of a sequence of courses intended primarily for physical science majors. Calculus-based course on electricity, magnetism and optics.

PHYS 220BL. Electricity and Magnetism Lab (1)

3 hours per week. (May be used to satisfy the lab requirement in Natural Sciences, General Education, provided PHYS 220B or PHYS 226 also is completed.)

PHYS 220B. Electricity and Magnetism (3) *Lab below

Electric and magnetic fields, circuit theory and electromagnetic induction. (Students using this course to satisfy the Natural Sciences requirement in General Education may satisfy the corresponding lab requirement by completing course PHYS 220BL.)

PHYS 220BL. Electricity and Magnetism Lab (1)

3 hours per week. (May be used to satisfy the lab requirement in Natural Sciences, General Education, provided PHYS 220B or PHYS 226 also is completed.)

Sample of an acceptable 3 series Introduction (UCSB)

All courses must have an accompanied lab

PHYS 6B. Introductory Physics (3) 

Prerequisite: Physics 6A with a minimum grade of C-.

Enrollment Comments: Quarters usually offered: Winter, Spring, Summer.

Presents concepts and methodologies for understanding physical phenomena, and is particularly useful preparation for upper-division study in the life sciences. Oscillatory motion. Vibrations, waves, sound. Fluids. Electrostatics and DC circuits. Magnetism and magnetic forces. Induction and Faraday's law. AC circuits. If time permits: Heat and thermodynamics.

PHYS 6BL. Introductory Experimental Physics (1)

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Physics 6B.

Experiments in the mechanical, electrical and thermal properties of matter,the behavior of light, and quantum phenomena with application to the biological sciences.

PHYS 6C. Introductory Physics (3)

Prerequisite: Physics 6B with a minimum grade of C-.

Enrollment Comments: Quarters usually offered: Spring, Summer, Fall.

Presents concepts and methodologies for understanding physical phenomena, and is particularly useful preparation for upper- division study in the life sciences. Electromagnetic waves. Geometric optics, optical instruments. Interference and diffraction. Quantum theory of the atom. Nuclear physics. If time permits: Special relativity, elementary particle physics.

PHYS 6CL. Introductory Experimental Physics (1)

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Physics 6C.

Experiments in the mechanical, electrical and thermal properties of matter,the behavior of light, and quantum phenomena with application to the biological sciences.

 

Statistic

REQUIREMENT DESCRIPTION

Any statistics course is acceptable.

Semester units: 3

Quarter units: 4

If the course description listed below were similar to the course you took then we would likely accept that course

MATH 140. Introductory Statistics (4)

Methods for displaying, describing and producing data. Normal distribution. Correlation and regression. Sampling distributions and probability. Statistical inference for means and proportions. (Available for General Education, Basic Skills Mathematics.)

HSCI 390/L. Biostatistics and Lab (3/1)

Principles, theory and practice of statistical analysis in health as they apply to health planning, epidemiological research and experimental research. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab.

PSY 320/L. Statistical Methods in Psychological Research and Lab (3/1)

Analysis of statistical decision-making procedures used in psychological research. Lab: Considers problem-solving techniques and computational methods needed to analyze data obtained in psychological experiments. 3 hours lecture-discussion, 2 hours lab per week.

SOM 120. Basic Business Statistics (3)

Descriptive statistics, elements of probability, probability distributions (including normal), sampling distributions, statistical inference for means and proportions (including estimation and hypothesis testing), simple linear regression and correlation. Applications of these topics in business and economics are emphasized. The course requires assignments in which students are required to explain the results of statistical computations using personal computer software.

Psychology

REQUIREMENT DESCRIPTION

Any Psychology course is acceptable.

Semester units: 3

Quarter units: 4

If the course description listed below were similar to the course you took then we would likely accept that course

PSY 150. Introduction to Psychology (3)

Psychology is the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. The content focuses on the exploration of major theories and concepts, methods, and research findings in psychology. Topics include the biological bases of behavior, ethics involved in research, perception, cognition, learning, memory, emotion, motivation, development, personality, social psychology, psychological disorders and therapeutic approaches, and applied psychology. Students are required to spend approximately 2.5 hours during the term in research-related activities. (Available for General Education, Social Sciences.)

Psychology II

REQUIREMENT DESCRIPTION

2nd Psychology course.  Upper Division, Developmental or Specialized Psychology courses only. 

A second Introductory or General   Psychology will not be accepted.

Abnormal Psychology or Psychopathology is highly recommended.

Kinesiology courses will not be accepted. 

Semester units: 3

Quarter units: 4

If the course description listed below were similar to the course you took then we would likely accept that course

PSY 310. Abnormal Psychology (3)

Survey of mental disorders, including biological, psychological and social/cultural determinants, as well as psychosocial and pharmacological interventions. This course fulfills the 300-level Clinical/Personality Psychology Cluster requirement for Psychology majors.

PSY 313. Developmental Psychology (3)

In the context of examining the development of the whole child, relevant aspects of physical, social, cognitive, linguistic and emotional change are highlighted as part of development from birth to adolescence. Emphasis on the study of the underlying processes and influences on human development. Cultural contexts of development, key changes, continuity and individual differences are examined. Includes evaluation of selected theories, contemporary issues and practical applications. This course fulfills the 300-level Developmental Psychology Cluster requirement for Psychology majors.

PSY 361. Adolescence (3)

Analysis of the physical, cognitive, social and emotional changes from puberty to adulthood. Examines contemporary youth culture from a historical and cross-cultural perspective. Discusses evaluation of age norms and deviant development. Project involving some aspect of adolescent development is required. This course fulfills the 300-level Developmental Psychology Cluster requirement for Psychology majors. (Cross-listed with CADV 361.)