Mechanical Engineering

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Undergraduate Program

Mechanical Engineering Lab Students StudyingMechanical Engineering majors at CSUN receive a solid education in the fundamentals of the discipline augmented by hands-on experience that the employers of our graduates have found to be invaluable.

The program includes study of modern topics including lab courses in contemporary measurement methods and mechatronics, the interaction between mechanical and electronic systems.

The freshmen and sophomore years provide the student with a breadth of knowledge that is required in specialized courses and in the career work of the mechanical engineer. During these years, students take courses in mathematics, chemistry, physics, engineering materials, engineering mechanics, and electrical systems. The junior year courses include engineering economics, engineering dynamics, strength of materials, thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, heat transfer, mechanical design, and the numerical analysis of engineering systems.

The senior year is composed of a group of required courses and elective courses that are related to the student’s area of specialization within Mechanical Engineering. The required courses include system dynamics, mechatronics, and two semesters of senior design. Students can take their electives to obtain more in-depth knowledge in the specialization areas listed below.

The Mechanical Engineering Department takes a practical approach to engineering, offering hands-on design experience as well as theoretical knowledge. A key to this practical training is the department’s senior design program, which is modeled on the industry workgroups that students will encounter on the job. Like professional engineers, our students design and develop a project, from conception through manufacture. In the process they gain valuable experience in working as a team, overcoming technical and management challenges and developing communication skills.

Past senior design projects have included: human-powered and solar-powered vehicles, super mileage vehicles, mini Baja (off-road) race cars, Formula SAE race cars, intelligent ground vehicles/mobile robots, battle-bots, and payload maximized model aircraft.

The ME Department offers a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering (BSME) degree. Mechanical engineering majors may elect one of the following specialization areas:

• Aerospace
• Automotive
• Energy and power
• Mechanical design
• Mechatronics and robotics
• Thermal-fluids

All mechanical engineering majors must complete the same set of requirements, but each specialization area will consist of a different set of senior electives.

Applications

To apply for admission, or to learn more about CSUN, visit the Admissions and Records website.

Course Description

Lower Division

ME 101/L. INTRODUCTION TO MECHANICAL ENGINEERING and LAB (1/1)

Prerequisite: MATH 102, 104, 105, 150A or 150B, or a passing score on the Math Placement Test (MPT) that satisfies prerequisites for MATH 150A or MATH 255A. Corequisite: ME 101L.

      Freshman orientation course for the Mechanical Engineering program, the profession, and an introduction to the University. “Tools of the trade” - the internet, word processing, spreadsheets, power point, computer-aided design, basic lab measurement instruments, commercial component catalogs, and numerically controlled machine tools to support prototype fabrication are introduced in the context of engineering practice. Fundamental engineering analysis/design is explored through simple examples covering all aspects of Mechanical Engineering. 1 hour lecture; 3 hours lab per week.

ME 196A-Z/L. EXPERIMENTAL TOPICS COURSES IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING (1/1)

Corequisites: ME 196AL-ZL

ME 186/L. COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN AND LAB (1/1)

Prerequisites: ME 101/L. COREQUISITE: ME 186L. 

      Introduction to concepts in engineering graphics and their implementation with Computer-Aided Design (CAD) parametric modeling tools.  Creation of sketches, parts, assemblies, and engineering drawings.  Application to group project, including oral and written reports.  One hour of lecture and three hours of lab per week.

ME 209. PROGRAMMING FOR MECHANICAL ENGINEERS (1)

Corequisite: MATH 150A. 

      Basic programming concepts, implemented with Visual Basic for Applications (VBA), with an emphasis on engineering problem solving. Topics include the use of flowcharts, variable types, the Excel/VBA environment, decision and looping structures, and program debugging.  Three hours of lab per week. 

ME 280. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS FOR MECHANICAL ENGINEERS (3)

Prerequisites: MATH 150B. 

      Recommended preparatory course: Math 250. Introduction to differential equations used in engineering applications. Engineering analysis of physical systems described by differential equations: pendulums, mass-spring damper, R-L-C circuits, vibrations, beam bending, heat transfer, and hydrodynamics. Exploration of solution techniques, including undetermined coefficients, power series, and Laplace Transform. Determination of initial/boundary conditions. Linear algebra and solution of systems of differential equations. Introduction to partial differential equations and separation of variables. Not available to students with credit for Math 280 or ECE 280.

ME 286. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING DESIGN (2)

Prerequisites: ME 186/L. 

      Introduction to mechanical design, design methodology, and design for manufacturing. Engineering materials selection, metal forming/removal theory and practice. A group design project is required.  Two hours of lecture per week. 

ME 296A-Z. EXPERIMENTAL TOPICS COURSES IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING (1-4)

UPPER-DIVISION

ME 309. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF ENGINEERING SYSTEMS (2)

Prerequisites: MATH 150B; ME 209 or COMP 106/L or ECE 206/L or CE 280/L.

      Features engineering problems which require the use of algorithms and numerical analysis to obtain a solution. Modern tools such as spreadsheets with imbedded high level languages are used for analysis and code development. Program documentation which requires extensive use of computer-based technical writing skills with graphical presentations. Cross section of problems are selected from various branches of engineering. Two 3-hour labs each week.

ME 330 MACHINE DESIGN (3)

Prerequisites: ME 286; CE 340; MSE 227.

       Engineering principles and practice in the selection and design of fasteners, bearings, couplings, shafting, transmissions and other mechanical power transmission devices. Design Project. 3 hours lecture per week.

ME 335/L. MECHANICAL MEASUREMENTS and LAB (1/1)

Prerequisites: PHYS 220B/L; ME 209. Corequisite: ME 335L.

      Measurement of temperature, pressure, flow rate, force, and motion. Statistical methods for analysis of uncertainty and experiment design. Use of data acquisition software for data collection and storage. Analysis of dynamic response of instruments. Written and oral presentations of experimental results. One hour lecture and one 3-hour lab per week.

ME 370. THERMODYNAMICS (3)

Prerequisites: MATH 250; PHYS 220A/L; CHEM 101/L.

      Fundamental theories and engineering applications of thermodynamics with emphasis of 1st and 2nd laws of thermodynamics. Thermodynamic properties of solids, liquids, gases, and mixtures. Work-producing and work-absorbing systems. Applications to design.

ME 375. HEAT TRANSFER I (3)

Prerequisites: MATH 280 or ME 280 or ECE 280; PHYS 220A/L; ME 370.

      Basic principles of heat transfer and their application. Introduction to conductive, convective, and radiative heat transfer. Applications to design.

ME 376. HEAT TRANSFER IN ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS (3)Prerequisites: MATH 280 or ECE 280; PHYS 220A/AL.

Prerequisites: Math 280 or ECE 280; PHYS 220A/L.

      Basic principles of thermodynamics and heat transfer applicable to electrical and electronic systems. Introduction of conductive, convective, and radiative modes of heat transfer. Analysis of a finned heat sink. Not available for credit for Mechanical Engineering majors.

ME 384. SYSTEM DYNAMICS: MODELING, ANALYSIS AND SIMULATION (3)

Prerequisite: AM 316; ECE 240/L. Corequisite: ME 390. 

      Modeling of dynamic engineering systems in various energy domains: mechanical, electrical, hydraulic and pneumatic; using bond graphs, block diagrams and state equations. Analysis of response of system models. Digital computer simulation.

ME 386/L. COMPUTER-AIDED ANALYSIS AND DESIGN AND LAB (2/1)

Prerequisites: ME 286. COREQUISITES: ME386, ME 330. 

      This course addresses the use of Finite Element Analysis (FEA) tools for effective and efficient design of mechanical elements. A commercial, general purpose FEA software application is used for the solution of non-trivial problems. Emphasis will be placed on the selection of suitable FE models, and interpretation and critical evaluation of the results. The integration of the use of FEA tools in a well organized design process is also emphasized. Lecture material is complemented by laboratory case studies and a design project. Two hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week.

ME 390. FLUID MECHANICS (3)

Prerequisite: MATH 250; ME 370; PHYS 220A/L. 

      Fundamental equations of fluid mechanics are derived and applied to engineering problems, with emphasis on understanding the physical principles involved. Basic developments are applied to compressible as well as incompressible fluids. Selective exploration of the state of the art of experimental knowledge in major areas of applications. Applications to design.

ME 396A-Z. EXPERIMENTAL TOPICS COURSES IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING (1-4)

ME 400A. ENGINEERING DESIGN CLINIC I (1-3)

      Group design experience involving teams of students and faculty working on the solution of engineering design problems submitted by industry and government agencies.

ME 400B. ENGINEERING DESIGN CLINIC II (1-3)

Prerequisite: ME 400A. Continuation of ME 400A.

ME 415. KINEMATICS OF MECHANISMS (3)

Prerequisite: AM 316; upper-division standing.

      Study of forces and motion of constrained mechanisms in machine systems. Analysis of linkages, cams, sliders, crank and rocker, offset crank-slider, universal joints, etc. Internal combustion engine is utilized to demonstrate application of these elements at a systems level.

ME 430. MACHINE DESIGN APPLICATIONS (3)

Prerequisite: ME 330; CE 340. 

      Continuation of ME 330 with emphasis on fatigue of machine parts, life, wear and friction considerations. Turbine, pump, transmissions and other devices discussed and analyzed as case studies. Design project.

ME 431/L. MACHINE DESIGN AND MANUFACTURING AND LAB (2/1)

Prerequisites: ME 286; CE 340. Corequisite: ME 431L.

      An advanced mechanical design course with emphasis on computer aided design and design for manufacturing of machine parts. Introduction to machine elements. Metal machining theory, operation, and tool technology. Non-traditional machining and surface treatment. Working drawings, tolerancing, and limits of fit. Fixture design and planning. 2 hours of lecture and 3 hours of lab per week.

ME 433. TRIBOLOGY: LUBRICATION, FRICTION AND WEAR (3)

Prerequisite: ME 390.

      Study of adhesion, friction, wear and lubricated behavior of solid surfaces in relative motion. Hydrodynamic lubrication, bearing load criteria, leakage and heat balance. Influence of bearing material, surface finish and lubricant composition on the design of lubricated mechanical systems including rolling elements, gears, cams and linkages.

ME 434. GEOMETRIC DIMENSIONING AND TOLERANCING (3)

Prerequisites: ME 330.

      Fundamental principles of geometric dimensioning and tolerancing (GD&T) and their applications in computer aided mechanical design. Interpretation of fits, limits, and tolerances. Thorough analysis of coordinate and positional tolerancing. Gaging techniques, material conditions and current standards examined. Design project required. Available for graduate credit. Three hours of lecture per week.

ME 435/L. MECHATRONICS and LAB (2/1)

Prerequisite: ECE 240/L; ME 335/L. Corequisite: ME 435L. Recommended corequisite: ME 335 or ECE 320.

      Machine and process control applications, data acquisition systems, sensors and transducers, actuating devices, hardware controllers, transducer signal processing and conditioning. 2 hours lecture and one 3-hour lab each week. (Crosslisted with ECE 435/L)

ME 436/L. MECHANICS AND DESIGN OF COMPOSITE MATERIALS AND LAB (2/1)

Prerequisites: ME 330, ME 386/L. Corequisite: ME 436L.

      Introduction to composite materials. Analysis, design and applications of laminated fiber reinforced composites. Macro-mechanical analysis of engineering constants and failure. Design project.

ME 460. AUTOMOTIVE ENGINEERING (3)

Prerequisites: AM 316; ME 330.

      Introduction to automotive engineering. Design and analysis of automotive chassis, suspension, steering, brakes, power plants and drive system. Vehicle dynamics, performance and system optimization. Design project required.

ME 462. INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES (3)

Prerequisites: ME 330; ME 370. Recommended Corequisite: ME 470.

      Characteristics and Performance of internal combustion engines, with an emphasis on Otto and Diesel types. Alternative cycles also are considered. Thermodynamics of cycles, combustion, emissions, ignition, fuel metering and injection, friction, supercharging and engine compounding. 3 hours lecture per week.

ME 470. THERMODYNAMICS II (3)

Prerequisite: ME 370.

      Continuation of Thermodynamics I, with applications to engineering systems. Gas and vapor cycles for power and refrigeration. Reactive and non-reactive mixtures. Introduction to combustion.

ME 476. Heat Transfer II (3)

Prerequisites: ME 375; ME 390; ME 280 or MATH 280 or ECE 280.

    Intermediate topics on conduction, convection, radiation heat transfer. Introductions to heat exchangers, simultaneous heat and mass transfer and phase change. Applications to design.

ME 482. ALTERNATIVE ENERGY ENGINEERING I (3)

Prerequisite: ME 375; ME 390; MSE 304.

      Principles of non-fossil fueled energy conversion systems. Review of principles of energy release in nuclear reactions. Analysis and design techniques applicable to fission, fusion, and geothermal power plants. Environmental effects, safety and safeguards considerations.

ME 483. ALTERNATIVE ENERGY ENGINEERING II (3)

Prerequisites: ME 375; ME 390; MSE 304.

      Solar radiation characteristics. Solar energy collection and conversion devices. Design and analysis of passive and active solar energy systems. Solar electric power production. Wind energy conversion. Economic analysis.

ME 484/L. CONTROL OF MECHANICAL SYSTEMS and LAB (2/1)

Prerequisites: ME 384. Corequisite 484L.

      Classical feedback control theory emphasizing mechanical systems. Time domain, frequency domain, techniques: stability criteria, system sensitivity. Introduction to design compensation and methods. Digital computer simulation of translational and rotational mechanical, hydraulic and pneumatic systems. Control system design projects. 2-hour lecture and one 3-hour lab per week.

ME 485. INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING (3)

Prerequisite: ME 370.

      Application of concepts of mass and energy balances to environmental problems, as a basis for analyzing and understanding the multimedia aspect of environmental engineering. Introduction of principles of air pollution control and global climate change, water and wastewater treatment, groundwater contamination, hazardous waste, risk assessment, and resource recovery. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of sources of pollutants and treatment and reduction processes. Description of pertinent environmental legislations. A semester long team design project is assigned.

ME 486A. SENIOR DESIGN IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING I (2)

Prerequisites: ME 309; ME 330. Corequisites: ME 386/L.

      First semester of a two semester capstone design experience, simulating professional mechanical engineering practice. Emphasis is on the application of engineering fundamentals to a comprehensive design project, utilizing Computer Aided Design and Analysis tools. Addresses effective group participation, and preparation of written and oral preliminary and critical design reviews. Ethical, regulatory, manufacturing, and economic issues are considered as required by the project definition. Two 3-hour labs per week.

ME 486B. SENIOR DESIGN IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING II (2)

Prerequisite: ME 486A. Continuation of ME 486A.

      Continuation and realization of the design project initiated in ME 486A. Project culminates in a final written report and oral presentation. Two 3-hour labs per week.

ME 486C. DESIGN LEADERSHIP (3)

Prerequisite: Instructor consent.

      Capstone design project management and design leadership through participation in large group simulation of Engineering design project that takes process from concept to demonstrated hardware.

ME 490. FLUID DYNAMICS (3)

Prerequisite: ME 390.

      Second-semester fluids course with applications to systems of engineering interest. Potential flows, boundary layers, duct flows, lubrication theory, lift and drag. One dimensional compressible flow with area change, friction, heating/cooling, normal shock waves, oblique shock waves, and Prandtl-Meyer expansions. Both numerical and analytical solution techniques are explored.

ME 491. THERMAL-FLUIDS LAB (1)

Prerequisite: ME 335; 370; 390; 375.

      Experimental studies of fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, and heat transfer. Measurement and analysis of performance of simple cyclic devices, aerodynamic shapes, turbomachines, piping systems, and heat exchangers. one 3-hour lab per week.

ME 493. HYDRAULICS (3)

Prerequisite: ME 390.

      Fundamental principles of incompressible fluid flow and their applications to pipe flow, open channel flow, and the performance of hydraulic turbomachines. Flow in pipe systems ranging from simple series systems to complex branched networks. Uniform flows, gradually varying flows, rapid transitions, and hydraulic jumps in open channels. Performance of radial, mixed-flow, and axial flow centrifugal pumps and turbines, and of impulse turbines.

ME 496A-Z. EXPERIMENTAL TOPICS COURSES IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING (1-4)

ME 498. SUPERVISED INDIVIDUAL PROJECTS (1-3)

      Studies in Mechanical Engineering. (See subtitle in appropriate Schedule of Classes)

ME 499A-C. INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-3)

 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS - AEROSPACE ENGINEERING

LOWER DIVISION

AE 196A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in Aerospace Engineering (1-4)

AE 296A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in Aerospace Engineering (1-4)

UPPER DIVISION

AE 396A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in Aerospace Engineering (1-4)

AE 472. Aeropropulsion Systems (3)

Prerequisites: ME 390; ME 370.

        Analysis of aeropropulsion systems: gas turbine, fan jet, ram jet, scram jet, scram-rocket, solid rocket and liquid rocket systems. Introduction to aero-thermodynamics, and advanced propellant combustion processes.

AE 480. Fundamentals of Aerospace Engineering (3)

Prerequisites: PHYS 220A/L; ME 390.

        Atmospheric structure/ space environment. Aircraft/spacecraft configurations. Aircraft/missile systems performance: flight envelope, aerodynamic approximations, available propulsion systems, structural form; take-off, landing, climb and range. Introduction to vehicle stability and control.

AE 486A. Senior Design in Aerospace Engineering I (2)

Prerequisite: Senior standing in Engineering. 

      Capstone design experience, simulating the “real” engineering environment. Synthesis of engineering fundamentals applied to systems design through group participation. Computer-Aided-Engineering Design. Construct, develop and test proposed design components; use of wind tunnels, engine dynamometers, computerized simulations of systems performance. Two three-hour labs per week.

AE 486B. Senior Design in Aerospace Engineering II (2)

Prerequisite: AE 486A.

      Continuation of AE 486A. Students carry out the group design project initiated in AE 486A. Influence of technical, legal, ethical and regulatory constraints are considered. Computer-Aided-Engineering Design methods are utilized. Two three-hour labs per week.

AE 496A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in Aerospace Engineering (1-4)

AE 498. Supervised Individual Projects (1-3)

      Studies in Aerospace Engineering with course content to be determined. (See subtitle in appropriate Schedule of Classes)

AE 499A-C. Independent Study (1-3)

CECS Policy on Double Majors

For students who wish to pursue a double major, where both majors are offered by the College of Engineering and Computer Science, two conditions must be satisfied:

a) The second major must require at least 30 units of additional non-overlapping course work.

b) The chairs of both departments offering the two majors must sign the approval form (except if both majors are in one   department, then that chair's signature is sufficient)."


Additional information about the undergraduate program is available in the CSUN catalog.

Admissions

Intelligent Ground Vehicle TeamHigh School Preparation:

The CSUN ME program assumes that students have a strong high school preparation in science, mathematics, and English. High school courses should include four years of mathematics, four years of English and at least a year of Chemistry and Physics with labs. The mathematics courses should include geometry, trigonometry and algebra. Calculus is desirable.

CSUN provides the opportunity for students who have not had a complete background of pre-engineering work in high school to take courses here to prepare them for the major. These additional courses will not count towards the major and may increase the time to graduate. CSUN provides testing as outlined below to ensure that students start their CSUN engineering course work at an appropriate level.

Pre-registration Testing Requirements:

The campus requires all beginning students to take the Entry Level Mathematics Exam (ELM) and the English Placement Test (EPT) prior to enrolling in their course or obtain an exemption to these requirements by their score on an equivalent test. Refer to the section of this catalog entitled Appendices-Admission for further details on these exams and alternative test.


In addition to these general university requirements, students entering the Mechanical Engineering program need to take the following exams:

  • Mathematics Placement Test (MPT) is required prior to enrollment in MATH 150A. Students who have passed or are exempt from the ELM should take this exam prior to enrolling in their classes so they may be placed in the appropriate mathematics course. Students with scores of 3, 4, or 5 on the AP Calculus AB or BC are exempt from the MPT.
  • Chemistry Placement Test (CPT) is required with a minimum score of 40 prior to enrolling in CHEM 101/L. Students who do not achieve this score must complete CHEM 100 with a grade of C or better (taken at CSUN) before taking CHEM 101/L. An advisor will review the details of these examinations with each student before they enroll in their courses.

 

First Time Freshman

All entering first-time freshmen must submit ACT/SAT scores and a final official high school transcript which confirms date of graduation. Students who do not supply their final transcripts will be subject to cancellation of the admission offer. These transcripts will be used to verify the completion of college preparatory courses that are required for admission to the CSU.

All entering freshman, who are not exempt from the EPT (English Placement Test) and/or the ELM (Entry Level Mathematics Exam), must complete these tests as soon as possible. You must take them before you can begin your studies at CSUN. Information about these examinations can be obtained by contacting the Testing Center at (818) 677-2369.

Transfer Students

Lower Division Transfers (fewer than 60 transferable units)
Transfer applicants who have completed fewer than 60 transferable semester units are currently not being admitted to CSUN due to increased enrollment demands. No exceptions are anticipated at this time. However, if future exceptions are made, lower-division transfer applicants may need to meet the following eligibility requirements.  You must have a grade point average of 2.0 or better in all transferable college units attempted, they must also be in good standing at the last college or university attended and must have completed sections A-1 (Written Composition) and A-3* (Mathematics) of the CSU General Education requirements with a "C" or better to be eligible to transfer to California State University, Northridge. Official college transcripts confirming this information must be submitted prior to admission.

  • Pre-Calculus does not satisfy math requirement but Calculus 1 (or its equivalent) does.


Upper Division Transfers (60 or more transferable units)
Transfer applicants who have completed 60 or more transferable semester units must have a grade point average of 2.0 or better (3.9 for outside local area) and must have completed the CSU General Education requirements sections A-1 (Written Composition), A-3* (Mathematics) and A-4 (Speech Communication) prior to admission. They must submit official college transcripts confirming this information as soon as possible in order for this information to be evaluated and their admission be determined. Transcripts showing "Work in Progress" will be accepted, but all basic subjects courses noted above and a minimum of 60.0 transferable units must be completed prior to admission. Final transcripts are also required.

  • Pre-Calculus does not satisfy math requirement but Calculus 1 (or its equivalent) does.


For more information on requirements and deadlines, please see CSUN Transfer Admission Requirements.

Course Substitution / Pre-Approval Policy

Advising

Please refer to the Academic Advising Schedule

Please click HERE for a copy of the Fall 2017 Group Advisement Presentation

Course Flow Chart (.pdf)

 

Flow Chart, Effective Fall 2016

Course Prerequisites

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING PREREQUISITES

CoursePrerequisites

ME 101/L - Introduction to Mechanical Engineering and Lab

MATH 102 or higher

ME 186/L - Computer-Aided Design and Lab

Math 102 (or higher), ME 101/L 

ME 209 - Programming for Mechanical Engineers

Corequisite: Math 150A

ME 280 - Differential Equations for Mechanical Engineers

MATH 150B,

Recommended preparatory course: Math 250

ME 286 - Mechanical Engineering Design

ME 186/L; Corequisite MSE 227

ME 309 - Numerical Analysis of Engineering Systems

MATH 150B, ME 209, or COMP 106/L, or

ECE 206/L.  *Note ME majors must take ME 209.

ME 330 - Machine Design

ME 286, CE 340, MSE 227

ME 335/L - Mechanical  Measurements and Lab

PHYS 220B, ME 209

ME 370 - Thermodynamics

Chem 101/L, MATH 250, PHYS 220A/L

ME 375 - Heat Transfer I

MATH 280 or ME 280 or ECE 280, PHYS 220A/L, ME 370

ME 384 - System Dynamics: Modeling, Analysis and Simulation

AM 316, ECE 240/L, Corequisite: ME 390

ME 386/L - Computer-Aided Analysis & Design and Lab

ME 286, Corequisite: ME 330

ME 390 - Fluid Mechanics

ME 370, PHYS 220A/L, MATH 250

ME 435/L - Mechatronics and Lab

ECE 240/L, ME 335/L

ME 491 - Thermal-Fluids Lab

ME 335/L, ME 370, ME 375, ME 390

ME 486A - Senior Design in Mechanical Engineering I

ME 309, ME 330, Corequisite: ME 386/L

ME 486B - Senior Design in Mechanical Engineering II

ME 486A

4 Senior Electives

Any 400- or 500-level ME course except those

on "not from" list on DPR

Senior year courses cannot be taken unless the student has previously completed, or is concurrently completing, all freshman-, sophomore- and junior- year requirements.

MATH & SCIENCE PREREQUISITES

CoursePrerequisites

CHEM 101/L - General Chemistry and Lab

Satisfactory score on the Chemistry Placement Test(CPT)

or a grade of C or higher (C- is unacceptable) in CHEM 100 taken at CSUN only

MATH 150A - Calculus I

Placement tests or Non-Lower Division Class Prerequisites

(See the Math department for details)

MATH 150B - Calculus II

MATH 150A

PHYS 220A/L - Mechanics and Lab

MATH 150A

PHYS 220B/L - Electricity and Magnetism and Lab

PHYS 220A/L, MATH 150B

MATH 250 - Calculus III

MATH 150B with a grade of "C" or better

MATH 280 - Applied Differential Equations

MATH 150B with a grade of "C" or better

ENGINEERING PREREQUISITES

CoursePrerequisites

MSE 227/L - Engineering Materials and Lab

MATH 150A, PHYS 220A/L, CHEM 101/L

CE 240 - Engineering Statics

PHYS 220A/L, Corequisite: MATH 150B

ECE 240/L - Electrical Engineering Fundamentals and Lab

PHYS 220B/L, MATH 250, Corequisite: MATH 280 or ME 280 or ECE 280

MSE 304 - Engineering Economic Analysis

MATH 150B and Completion of Lower Division Writing Requirement

CE 340 - Strength of Materials

CE 240, MATH 280 or ME 280 or ECE 280

AM 316 - Engineering Dynamics

CE 240, MATH 280 or ME 280 or ECE 280

AM 317 - Mechanics Lab

Prerequisites: CE 340. Corequisite: AM 316

Special Grade Requirements

  1. All students must pass the English Placement Test with a score of 151 or higher to enroll in any engineering courses at the 200-level.
  2. All students must complete the lower division writing requirement before enrolling in any 300-level engineering courses.
  3. Students who have completed 56 units and have met the lower division writing requirement are required to take the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Examination (UDWPE) as early as possible and no later than the semester in which 75 units are completed. Students who have not attempted the exam by the completion of 75 units will have a hold placed on their subsequent class registration and may delay their graduation.
  4. Senior year courses cannot be taken unless the student has previously completed, or is concurrently completing, all freshman-, sophomore- and junior-year requirements. A grade of “C-” or better is required in all courses in the major. The Mathematics department requires a grade of “C” in prerequisite courses.

Suggested Electives by Area of Emphasis (.pdf)

Degree Requirements

Teacher and Student MeetingSpecial Grade Requirements:

  • All students must pass the English Placement Test with a score of 151 or higher to enroll in any engineering courses at the 200 level
  • All students must complete the lower-division writing requirement before enrolling in any 300-level engineering courses.
  • Students must take the UDWPE no later than the semester in which 75 units are completed.
  • Senior year courses cannot be taken unless the student has previously completed, or is concurrently completing, all freshman, sophomore, and junior year requirements. A grade of C- or better is required in all courses in the major. The Mathematics Department requires a C grade in its prerequisite courses.

 



LOWER-DIVISION REQUIRED COURSES (47 UNITS)

 

FRESHMAN YEAR

CourseTitleUnits

ME 101/L

Introduction to Mechanical Engineering and Lab

1/1

ME 186/L

Computer-Aided Design

1/1

CHEM 101/L

General Chemistry and Lab

4/1

Math 150A

Calculus I

5

MATH 150B

Calculus II

5

PHYS 220A/L

Mechanics and Lab

3/1

Total

 

23

SOPHOMORE YEAR

Course TitleUnits

ME 209

Programming for Mechanical Engineers

1

ME 286

Mechanical Engineering Design 

2

CE 240

Engineering Statics

3

ECE 240/L

Electrical Engineering Fundamentals and Lab

3/1

MATH 250

Calculus III

3

MATH 280

Applied Differential Equations

3

MSE 227/L

Engineering Materials and Lab

3/1

PHYS 220B/L

Electricity and Magnetism and Lab

3/1

Total

 

24



UPPER-DIVISION REQUIRED COURSES (52 UNITS)

JUNIOR YEAR

Course TitleUnits

ME 309

Numerical Analysis of Engineering Systems

2

ME 330

Machine Design

3

ME 335/L

Mechanical Measurements and Lab

1/1

ME 370

Thermodynamics

3

ME 375

Heat Transfer I

3

ME 386/L

Computer-Aided Analysis & Design

2/1

ME 390

Fluid Mechanics

3

AM 316

Engineering Dynamics

3

AM 317

Mechanics Lab

1

CE 340

Engineering Mechanics II

3

MSE 304

Engineering Economic Analysis

3

Total

 

29

SENIOR YEAR

Course TitleUnits

ME 384

System Dynamics: Modeling, Analysis and Simulation

3

ME 435/L

Mechatronics and Lab

2/1

ME 486A

Senior Design in Mechanical Engineering

2

ME 486B

Senior Design in Mechanical Engineering

2

ME 491

Experimental Methods in Thermal-Fluids Systems

1

Total

 

11

 

UPPER-DIVISION SENIOR ELECTIVES (12 UNITS):

Students must select 12 units of electives from 400 and/or 500-level engineering courses. These electives together with the required senior year courses listed above, constitute the student’s Mechanical Engineering senior year. The elective program must be approved by the Mechanical Engineering Department before the student files a graduation check.

Suggested Senior Electives by Area of Emphasis (.pdf)


TOTAL UNITS IN THE MAJOR: 99



GENERAL EDUCATION (27 UNITS):

Mechanical Engineering majors have to follow a modified general education program depending upon the year and enrollment status as a college student. Returning and transfer students should consult an advisor before planning their general education programs. The requirements for students entering in Fall 2006 under the new PLAN R is described here. Continuing students and some first time transfer students may elect to continue with the former GE Plan C. Students should refer to prior catalog editions and consult with an academic advisor in selecting their required GE courses. 

Mechanical Engineering students are required to take courses in the following GE sections: Analytical Reading and Expository Writing (3 units), Oral Communication (3 units), Social Sciences (3 units), Arts and Humanities (6 units), Comparative Cultures (6 units), Title 5 (6 units). All other GE requirements are met through completion of courses in the major.


Students are required to complete one upper-division Subject Explorations or Title 5 course that satisfies the Information Competency requirement.

TOTAL UNITS REQUIRED FOR DEGREE: 126

General Education Options

GENERAL EDUCATION OPTIONS

RequirementUnits RequiredAvailable Courses

Analytical Reading/Expository Writing (A1)

     3 Units

AAS 155, CHS 155, ENG 155, PAS 155

Oral Communication (A4)

     3 Units

CHS 151, COMS 151, COMS 225, PAS 151

Arts and Humanities (S2)

     6 Units

Courses listed on page 29.

Social Sciences (S3)

     3 Units

Courses listed on page 30.

Comparative Cultural Studies (S5)

     6 Units

Courses listed on page 32 - 33.

U.S. History (T1)

     3 Units

CHS 245, HIST 270, 271, 371, PAS 271, 272

Government (T2, T3)

     3 Units

CHS 269, 445, PAS 161, POLS 155, 355

Long Range Course Schedule (.pdf)

Objectives and Outcomes

BSME Program Objectives

The CSUN undergraduate program should prepare students to enter the engineering profession as a skilled practitioner who can make a solid contribution to the field, find job satisfaction, and have a lifelong career. To accomplish this overall goal, a CSUN graduate should meet the following accomplishments during the first few years following graduation:

  1. Have an engineering job or a position that utilizes the application of their engineering education in the workplace.
  2. Demonstrate a record of professional development activities related to the successful practice of engineering.
  3. Accept additional responsibilities to meet evolving workplace needs and be regarded by colleagues and supervisors as an effective member of their organization.

The objectives were approved by the faculty on November 9, 2012.

Program Outcomes

  1. An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering
  2. An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data
  3. An ability to design a mechanical/thermal system, component, or process to meet desired needs
  4. An ability to function on multidisciplinary teams
  5. An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems
  6. An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
  7. An ability to communicate effectively
  8. The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global and societal context
  9. A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning
  10. A knowledge of contemporary issues
  11. An ability to use the technique, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice

The BSME program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org.

 

Sample Four Year Program

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
FOUR-YEAR CURRICULUM PLAN 
A PDF Version of the Four-Year Plan may be accessed at this link: Mechanical Engineering 4 Year Plan

                        FRESHMAN YEAR                                 

Course Fall SemesterUnitsCourseSpring SemesterUnits

ME 101/L - Intro. to Mech. Eng.

2

ME 186/L-Computer-Aided Design

2

Chem 101/L - Gen. Chem. & Lab

5

Phys 220A/L - Mechanics & Lab

4

Math 150A - Calculus I

5

Math 150B - Calculus II

5

GE - Fresh. Comp. (e.g. ENGL 155)

3

GE - Oral Comm. (e.g. COMS 151)

3

 

 

ME 209 - Programming for ME

1

Total

15

Total

15

 

 

                                   SOPHOMORE YEAR                                

Course Fall SemesterUnitsCourseSpring SemesterUnits

ME 286 - Mechanical. Eng. Design

2

Math 280 - Applied Diff. Equations

3

Math 250 - Calculus III

3

ECE 240/L - Elec. Eng. Fund. & Lab

4

Phys 220B/L - Elec. & Mag. & Lab

4

CE 240 - Eng. Statics

3

MSE 227/L - Eng. Materials & Lab

4

GE - U.S. History (e.g. HIST 270)

3

GE - American Gov (e.g. POLS 155)

3

GE - Comp. Cultural Studies (LD)

3

Total

16

Total

16

                 * Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam should be taken at the start of the junior year.

 

                                       JUNIOR YEAR                                  

Course Fall SemesterUnitsCourseSpring SemesterUnits

ME 309 - Num. Analysis Eng. Sys.

2

ME 330 - Machine Design

3

ME 335/L - Mech. Measurements

2

ME 375 - Heat Transfer

3

ME 370 - Thermodynamics

3

ME 386 / L - C-A Analysis & Design

3

AM 316 - Eng. Dynamics

3

ME 390 - Fluid Mechanics

3

CE 340 - Strength of Materials

3

AM 317 - Mechanics Lab

1

GE - Social Science (LD)

3

MSE 304 - Eng. Economic Analysis

3

Total

16

Total

16

 

 

             SENIOR YEAR                                   

Course Fall SemesterUnitsCourseSpring SemesterUnits

ME 486A - Senior Design in ME I

2

ME 486B - Senior Design in ME II

2

ME 384 - Systems Dynamics

3

ME 435/L - Mechatronics & Lab

3

Senior Elective

3

ME 491 - Thermal-Fluids Lab

1

Senior Elective

3

Senior Elective

3

GE - Arts & Humanities (UD)*

3

Senior Elective

3

GE - Arts & Humanities (LD)

3

GE - Comp. Cultural Studies (UD)*

3

Total

17

Total

15

 

* One of  these courses needs to satisfy the Information Competency requirement

Total number of units of Senior Electives: 12

Total number of units in Major: 99 (MATH 102/104 & CHEM 100 do not count as credit for the degree)

Total number of units for Degree: 126

View the CSUN Catalog for another version of this Sample Four Year Plan.

Sample Five Year plan

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 
FIVE-YEAR CURRICULUM PLAN 

A PDF version of the Five-Year Plan may be accessed at this link: Mechanical Engineering 5 Year Plan

                                 FIRST YEAR                             

Course Fall SemesterUnitsCourse Spring SemesterUnits

Me 101/L - Intro. to Mech. Eng.

2

ME 186/L - Computer-Aided Design

2

Math 102 - College Algebra

3

Math 104 - Trig. & Geometry

3

Chem. 100 - Principles of Chemistry

3

Chem. 101/L - Gen. Chem. & Lab

5

GE − Fresh. Comp. (e.g. ENGL 155)

3

GE - Oral Comm. (e.g. COMS 151) 

GE - Comp. Cultural Studies (LD)

3

 

 

Total

14

Total

13

 

 

                               SECOND YEAR                          

Course Fall SemesterUnitsCourse Spring SemesterUnits

ME 286 - Mechanical Eng. Design

2

ME 209 - Programming for ME

1

Math 150A - Calculus I

5

Math 150B - Calculus II      

5

GE - Arts & Humanities (LD)

3

Phys 220 A/L - Mechanics & Lab

4

GE - Social Science (LD)   

3

GE - U.S. History (e.g. HIST 270)

3   

GE - American Gov (e.g. POLS 155)

3

 

 

Total

16

Total

13

 

 

                                      THIRD YEAR                            

Course Fall SemesterUnitsCourse Spring SemesterUnits

ME 309 - Num. Analysis Eng. Syst.

2

ME 370 - Thermodynamics      

3

Math 250 - Calculus III

3

Math 280 - Applied Diff. Equations

3

Phys 220B/L - Elec. & Mag. & Lab

4

CE 240 - Eng. Statics

3

MSE 227/L - Eng. Materials & Lab

4

ECE 240/L - Elec. Eng. Fund. & Lab

4

Total

13

Total

13

                 * Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam Should be taken when junior status has been obtained.

 

 

                  FOURTH YEAR                          

Course Fall SemesterUnitsCourse Spring SemesterUnits

ME 335/L - Mech. Measurements

2

ME 330 - Machine Design

3

ME 375 - Heat Transfer

3

ME 386/L - C-A Analysis & Design

3

AM 316 - Eng. Dynamics

3

ME 390 - Fluid Mechanics

3

CE 340 - Strength of Materials

3

AM 317 - Mechanics Lab

1

GE - Arts & Humanities (UD)*

3

MSE 304 - Eng. Economic Analysis

3

Total

14

Total

13

 

 

               FIFTH YEAR                            

Course Fall SemesterUnitsCourse Spring SemesterUnits

ME 486A - Senior Design in ME I

2

ME 486B - Senior Design in ME II

2

ME 384 - Systems Dynamics

3

ME 435/L - Mechatronics & Lab

3

ME 491 - Thermal-Fluids Lab

1

ME Senior Electives (2)

6

ME Senior Electives (2) 

GE - Comp. Cultural Studies (UD)*

3

Total

12

Total

14

* One of these courses needs to satisfy the Information Competency requirement.

Total number of units of Senior Electives: 12
Total number of units in Major: 99 (MATH 102/104 & CHEM 100 do not count as credit for the degree) 
Total number of units for Degree: 126

 

Unit Requirements

UNITS REQUIRED

DivisionRequired Units

General Education

27 Units

Lower Division (100 and 200 Level)

47 Units

Upper Division (300, 400 and 500 Level)

52 Units

Total:

126 Units

Senior Design Projects

Senior Design Projects

Senior Design ProjectProfessor
Computer-Aided Engineering design projectBishay
SAE Aero Design projectDurgesh
Human Powered Vehicle design projectKhachatourians
Advanced Wheelchair design projectNandikolla
Formula SAE Collegiate design projectPrince