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    The Premiere AT Conference

This Event Has Concluded

Pre-Conference Workshops

Pre-Conference Workshops will be offered on Monday, March 11 and Tuesday, March 12, 2019 for Full-Day and Half-Day sessions. These workshops are designed to give in-depth training on specific topics.

Monday, March 11, 2019

9:00 AM PST


Bridging Diverse Literacy Gaps with Multisensory Intervention

Full Day Workshop

Summary

Level: Beginner

The integration of technology into literacy intervention can support a learner’s experience by providing increased engagement. Assistive Technology bridges gaps for learners with language and literacy disabilities by supporting access to age appropriate content. AT aids in reducing frustration and prevents individuals from falling behind at school or work.  If individuals do not have access to AT, their literacy development will suffer, negatively impacting higher order skills, such as comprehension, idea synthesis, and conversational discourse, directly hindering their opportunity for higher education and/or future employment. AT and explicit intervention CAN play nice!

Learning Objectives

  • Recognize the nature of language and literacy disabilities and the role of multisensory structured language instruction (MSL).
  • Outline the critical components for proficient reading including language development, phonological awareness, decoding, fluency, comprehension, and written expression.
  • Identify technologies to support each area of comprehensive literacy plan for diverse learners at varying ages.
  • Access and explore potential assistive technology for direct instruction and/or accommodation for individuals with language and literacy disabilities across the life span.

Speaker Information

Kelsey Hall, Assistive Technology Coordinator

Kelsey Hall, CDP, Ed.M., M.S., CCC-SLP (Assistive Technology Coordinator in IT) is a certified Teacher of the Deaf (TOD), Speech-Language Pathologist (SLP), and Assistive Technology (AT) Specialist. Over the past 12 years, Kelsey has held a variety of roles in public education nationally and internationally with students Pre-K through post-secondary. Kelsey is currently the Assistive Technology Coordinator at the University of Massachusetts where she manages the Assistive Technology Center and provides campus-wide support in creating accessible educational materials, websites, and spaces. The Assistive Technology Center at UMass also provides training in the use of assistive technologies to support personalized learning and access to the curriculum for both the campus community and general public.

Diana Petschauer, Assistive Technology Professional and Consultant

Diana Petschauer, M.Ed., ATP is a RESNA certified Assistive Technology Professional, AT Consultant & founder of AT for Education, ATforED.com, and Access4Employment.com Diana has over 20 years of experience in Special Education, UDL & Assistive Technology, Preschool-Grade 12, Post-Secondary & adult services. She provides consultation, evaluation and training nationally & internationally. Diana is a faculty trainer for the Center on Technology and Disability (ctdinstitute.org) as well as ATinNH at the UNH Institute on Disability. Previous to her business, Diana was the AT Specialist at UNH. She holds her M.Ed in Special Education and national Assistive Technology certification via RESNA. Diana manages her multi-disciplinary team of consultants who travel daily throughout New England to provide AT & AAC evaluations, assessments, training (for students, staff and family), professional development workshops & webinars, online courses, consultation & accessibility services for students and adults to access education, the workplace & community.

Speakers

  • Kelsey Hall, University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • Diana Petschauer, Assistive Technology Professional and Consultant
Location
Orange County 1/2


Driving Accessibility Improvements in IT Products

Half Day Workshop

Summary

Level: Intermediate

Campuses are required to acquire accessible products yet vendors are not required to sell accessible products. The appropriate time to put the responsibility for accessibility on the vendor is during the acquisition process.  Insisting on accurate accessibility documentation, commitments from the vendor for accessibility improvements to the product, and informative information for the users is crucial to drive improvements to the product.  Accurate documentation gives campuses the opportunity to create Equally Effective Alternative Access Plans so students that encounter barriers can be quickly served with workarounds or accommodations.

Acquiring accessible IT products is one of the biggest challenges facing an institution when implementing an accessible technology program.  To meet this challenge the CSU has developed a process that integrates accessibility requirements into campus business processes and puts the responsibility on vendors for the accessibility of their product.

Working through the CSU approval process challenged McGraw-Hill Education to update the way they report on and support the accessibility compliance of our educational technology products.  McGraw-Hill will share insights to how their internal review processes, accessibility testing and reports so that they are better able to contextualize audit results providing accurate and informative documentation to customers, as well as the changes in regulations and awareness of accessibility.

Learning Objectives

  • Understand a critical review process for accessible IT product review engaging the vendor.
  • Learn how to select from the various levels of accessibility evaluation, from Accessibility Conformance Report review to full ac
  • Acquire strategies for engaging vendors in the accessibility conversation and product demonstrations
  • Understand the importance and components of the Equally Effect Alternative Access Plan

Speaker Information

Cheryl Pruitt, California State University, Chancellor's Office

Cheryl is the Director of the Accessible Technology Initiative (ATI) for the California State University (CSU) System. She oversees the ATI implementation across the CSU 23 campus system. Cheryl has been involved with the ATI since the beginning in 2007, first at the campus level, then at the systemwide level. Under her leadership the system has made significant progress towards implementing ATI process improvement in the areas of web accessibility, accessible procurement, and accessible instructional materials. She is currently managing several projects that are moving the initiative forward they include implementation of an ATI reporting process to measure the systemwide progress towards the ATI goals; creation of synergy projects resulting in systemwide shared services that are delivering cost savings; and a high level of cross-campus collaboration through the ATI Communities of Practice. Cheryl established and leads the CSU Accessible Technology Network (CSU ATN) which brings together accessibility experts across the CSU System to work collectively on accessibility projects that benefit the entire system.

Susan Cullen, California State University, Chancellor's Office

Sue Cullen is the Assistant Director of the Accessible Technology Initiative (ATI) for the California State University (CSU) System. Prior to joining the CSU Office of the Chancellor, Sue served as the campus ATI Executive Sponsor Designee, and created and directed the Universal Design Center (UDC) at California State University, Northridge. Sue trained the professional staff and paraprofessional students at the UDC to provide services to both CSU Northridge and the CSU. In addition, Sue helped build the CSU Accessible Technology Network (ATN), which is comprised of accessibility experts both inside and outside the CSU. Sue has a national reputation for IT Accessibility expertise, and is regularly called upon to present on IT accessibility and usability topics at national conferences. Sue is a Co-Chair of the EDUCAUSE ITACCESS Constituency Group.  She has been actively advocating for individuals with different physical abilities and processing styles in higher education since 1995.

Dawn Okinaka, California State University, Chancellor's Office

Dawn Okinaka is an ATI Accessibility Specialist for the Accessible Technology Initiative at the CSU Office of the Chancellor.  She is a member of the Accessible Technology Initiative team at the CSU Chancellor’s Office since 2013. Dawn has been involved in ATI activities since 2008, first at the Sacramento State and more recently at the Chancellor’s Office. In Dawn earned a Bachelor of Arts in Ethnic Studies in 2000 and Master of Arts in Educational Technology in 2009 from California State University, Sacramento. Dawn has made significant contributions to the ATI implementation in the areas of Procurement and Instructional Materials. Dawn leads the CSU Procurement Community of Practice where she engages community members from all twenty-three campuses in collaborative activities. She also leads several projects in the CSU Accessible Technology Network, which provide shared services to the CSU system. Dawn lead the cross campus team tasked with creating a standardized procurement process for the 23 campuses to adopt and adapt.  More recently, Dawn has been training campuses in how to critically review a VPAT and work with vendors to obtain meaningful information related to the accessibility of products and services used by the CSU.

Lin Mahoney, McGraw-Hill Education

Lin Mahoney is Accessibility Manager at McGraw-Hill Education.
Throughout her career, Lin has served both as a publisher representative fielding accessible file requests from DSS offices, as well as a campus accessibility coordinator working directly with students.  Lin is currently leading the digital accessibility initiative in McGraw-Hill’s Digital Platform Group focused on training and supporting teams as they strive to develop and deliver innovative and accessible learning technologies.

Speakers

  • Cheryl Pruitt, California State University, Chancellor's Office
  • Dawn Okinaka, California State University, Chancellor's Office
  • Susan Cullen, California State University, Chancellor's Office
  • Lin Mahoney, McGraw-Hill Education
Location
Orange County 3/4



1:30 PM PST


Creating Accessible Online Course Materials

Half Day Workshop

Summary

Level: Beginner

Accessibility shouldn’t be an afterthought. It is often easier and more effective to create with accessibility in mind rather than attempt to remediate access barriers. This workshop will focus on instructor created online course content including items created in popular desktop software. We will explore accessibility requirements for common course document types and lecture videos. Hands on instruction will be provided in creating accessible Word and PowerPoint files as well as recorded course lectures.

Learning Objectives

  • Understand online course content types & formats
  • Understand accessibility requirements for documents and multimedia files
  • Produce accessible online content in several formats

Speaker Information

Suzanne David, California State University, Northridge

Suzanne David is the e-Learning Technology Manager at Tseng College, California State University, Northridge (CSUN). Suzanne's educational background includes a Bachelor's degree in psychology from UCLA and a Master's degree in Human Factors and Applied Experimental Psychology from CSUN. Suzanne's academic interests include human cognition and memory, user experience design, and the intersection between user characteristics and technology usability. In addition to managing instructional technology for the Distance Learning unit, Suzanne is an adjunct professor in a master's degree program related to Assistive Technology. When she's not working, Suzanne enjoys reading, cooking, and traveling.

Shirley Ruiz

Shirley Ruiz is the Assistive Technology Specialist for the Center for Accessible Education department at University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). Prior to UCLA, Shirley was the Alternative Media Coordinator for the Disability Resources and Educational Services department at California State University Northridge (CSUN). Shirley is passionate about accessibility and committed to promoting student success. For the past 11 years Shirley has produced accessible textbooks and course content in various formats including Braille, PDF, Word, Enlarged Print, Tactile Graphics, etc., for students with print disabilities. Shirley has also presented workshops at the CSUN Assistive Technology Conference and is the Accessibility Editor for the Journal on Technology & Persons with Disabilities. Prior experience includes various positions within the print industry ensuring print accuracy and overseeing print production.

Speakers

  • Suzanne David, California State University, Northridge
  • Shirley Ruiz, University of California, Los Angeles
Location
Orange County 3/4


Tuesday, March 12, 2019

9:00 AM PST


Introduction to Assistive Technology

Full Day Workshop

Summary

Level: Beginner

Welcome to an introduction to the many types of Assistive Technology available today. This workshop is especially useful for newcomers to the fields of AT and disabilities and those who are first-timers at the CSUN Conference. Participants will gain a general understanding of assistive technology and be able to describe technologies that support participation, communication and learning. 

Learning Objectives

  • To have a general understanding of the AT used for a variety of disability types and be able to describe how the AT can support participation, communication, and learning
  • To be able to describe the process for AT assessment, acquisition, implementation, and follow-up
  • To have a general understanding of addressing challenges in various settings in order to promote continued growth and address future challenges
  • To be able to describe how to modify the environment and the individual’s technology  to include assistive technology solutions that support independence and functionality
  • To have a general understanding of how to use a variety of online resources and training opportunities to expand and support AT knowledge, skills, and abilities.
  • To have an understanding of the various employment options as an AT professional.

Speaker Information

Patrice Wheeler, California State University, Northridge

Patrice Wheeler has been an Assistive Technology Specialist at the community college and university levels since 1998. Her background is in education with an emphasis in Special Ed. She has earned an ATACP and has been a RESNA ATP. Patrice has experience in training students, faculty & staff on assistive technology, creating accessible formats for academic materials, and collaborating with campus IT for campus-wide access to assistive technology. Patrice meets with students with disabilities to assess their skill level with technology, discuss their academic challenges and determine the appropriate technology and strategies that will ensure access, enhance learning and promote success after graduation. Patrice is always on the lookout for new and emerging technology or strategies that promote student success both academically and professionally.

Speakers

  • Patrice Wheeler, California State University, Northridge
Location
Orange County 1/2


Sign Shapers

Half Day Workshop

Summary

Level: Beginner

Sign language is a helpful communication tool for students with Down syndrome, autism, ADHD, auditory processing disorder—the list goes on. However some of these students have issues that keep them from effectively using sign language. Three problems consistently pop-up that prevent students from progressing:

  1. Inability to make the connection between the sign and its meaning.
  2. Inability to correctly form the sign. An imprecise handshape is the signing equivalent of a speech impairment and can drastically affect the intelligibility of the message.
  3. Inability to remember the sign. Even with repeated exposure, the ability to recall and correctly reproduce the sign can be an obstacle for these students.

Sign Shapers were created as a way to scaffold instruction for these students, an extra step, to make it more accessible to them. Sign Shapers are easy-to-make, inexpensive “puppets” that can be created by teachers, therapists, parents—anyone who wants to help the student succeed in producing understandable signs. These attractive puppets entice the student to engage, correctly shaping their hand as it is inserted into the puppet. The design of the puppet takes advantage of the iconicity of the sign it represents, (the Sign Shaper for “shark” looks like a shark fin, “duck” resembles a duck’s beak, etc.) to help bring that connection of meaning, and assist with memory. The movement of the puppet helps develop motor memory. There are approximately 40 different handshapes used in American Sign Language (ASL). Once a handshape is mastered, the student can create a multitude of new signs which will now be understandable by changing one or more of the other parameters, (location, palm orientation, movement, and facial expression.) In this workshop, participants will make and take several Sign Shapers to begin using immediately with their students, and create a therapy kit to provide more intensive intervention. We will also learn how to create online books to specifically target the handshapes their students are working on mastering.

Learning Objectives

  • Learn how to make and use Sign Shapers to take advantage of iconicity and motor memory
  • Know the 40 handshapes of ASL and how to use Sign Shapers to help students correctly form these handshapes
  • Learn how to use a therapy kit to provide more intensive intervention to help students who need additional assistance
  • Learn to create materials to specifically target the handshapes your students are working on mastering

Speaker Information

Jane Hankins

Jane Hankins is a Deaf & Hard of Hearing specialist for Monterey County Office of Education. She received her Masters degree from California Lutheran University, and a graduate certificate in DeafBlind Rehabilitation from Northern Illinois University. While a graduate student, Jane entered RESNA's Student Design Competition for creating original assistive technology and was a finalist four years in a row. She also won the TREAT award (Translation of Rehabilitation Engineering Advances and Technology) for her design of the Doodle Bug writing aid. She has given workshops and presentations at multiple Cal-Ed (California Educators of the Deaf & Hard of Hearing) Conferences, both North and South, the National EHDI conference (Early Hearing Detection and Intervention), RESNA conferences, as well as trainings at the district level. She designed a communication system for children with severe disabilities called TICtalk (Touch Initiated) and just finished serving on the panel to recommend the new version of TPEs (Teaching Performance Expectations) for the Deaf & Hard of Hearing programs to the California Teaching Commission.

Maria Leontis

Maria Leontis is a Deaf & Hard of Hearing Specialist for the Monterey County Office of Education. She has an administrative credential from CSU San Luis Obispo, a certificate in Auditory Learning from University of North Carolina--Chapel Hill, and an Education Specialist--Deaf & Hard of Hearing credential from CSU San Francisco. She has an MA in Deaf Studies and just completed a second MA in Educational Leadership and Administration. She has co-presented workshops at Cal-Ed (California Educators of the Deaf & Hard of Hearing) Conferences, both North and South. She is originally from Greece, where she has family that she tries to visit at least once a year.

Sabrina Lu Ekanayake

While completing her degree at UCLA, Sabrina studied computer science and psychology. She had no idea at the time how this would lay the foundation for her passion and career in Assistive Technology. When her son was assessed for AAC and given LAMP she dove into learning about it. The motor planning aspects were the most fascinating to her. Unfortunately no one in his school could support it and a simpler AAC app was chosen. This is part of what propelled her to attend AAC trainings and complete the ATACP program at CSUN last Fall. She is so grateful to have been exposed to so many more aspects of AT and to have had the chance to work with Jane and Sign Shapers. Sabrina’s goal is to help arm students and providers with effective implementation strategies, especially those that combing motor planning and music.

Speakers

  • Maria Leontis
  • Jane Hankins
  • Sabrina Ekanayake
Location
Orange County 3/4



1:30 PM PST


Design Thinking, Innovative Technologies, and UDL: A Recipe for Success!

Half Day Workshop

Summary

Level: Intermediate

You may have seen the fun Virtual Reality (VR) booths at the mall or amusement park. Or heard about the Makerspaces trends in schools.  This emerging technology isn’t just fun and games. When it comes to education, it can be the motivator to engage and reach all learners in a classroom. This session will use lecture and small group  format introduce and review the Universal Design for Learning framework and introduce the design thinking approach to learning that includes considering real-world problems, research, analysis, conceiving original ideas, experimentation, building things by hand, collaboration, and performance. 

Participants will then apply the theoretical knowledge received to hands-on practice creating learning experiences supporting all learners, including learners with disabilities or other marginalized populations. We will create a pop-up makerspace and virtual reality laboratory that will utilize Google Expeditions, 360° video camera, as well as design unique instruments and have a battle of the bands.

Learning Objectives

  • Understand how to use the Universal Design for Learning Framework to reach all learners.
  • Identify components of the design thinking process applied to makerspaces and virtual reality technologies.
  • Practice creating learning experiences using innovative technologies.
  • Discuss the role of accessibility in implementing innovative technologies.

Speaker Information

Janet Peters, Project Coordinator of Educational and Assistive Technology

Janet Peters has been promoting and training on Universal Design for Learning since serving as an advisor on the National Center for Accessing the General Curriculum hosted by the Center for Applied Special Technology (CAST) in 2002. Janet is a CAST Faculty Cadre member, a mentor for the state of Minnesota Deport of Education’s UDL project, and works with the Minneapolis Public Schools to implement UDL in the classroom. Janet is currently with the Great Lakes ADA Center as their project coordinator on educational and assistive technology.

Jose Blackorby, Senior Director of Research and Development

Dr. Blackorby joined CAST in 2016 after nearly 25 years at SRI International, where most recently he was Co-Director of the Center for Education and Human Services.He has extensive experience in the design and implementation of large-scale, multifaceted studies with research, policy, and practice implications. He has led national studies on students with disabilities, including a national study of states' progress in implementing alternate assessment systems for students with significant cognitive disabilities and another on the implementation of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). In addition to large-scale research in special education, Dr. Blackorby has considerable experience in projects related to emerging trends in education reform and innovation generally, as well as their potential for students with disabilities.

Speakers

  • Jose Blackorby, CAST
  • Janet Peters, CAST
Location
Orange County 3/4