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Recreation and Tourism Management

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College of Health and Human Development

Staff

  • Pat Tabidian

Faculty

  • Mechelle Best
  • Craig Finney
  • Dianne Philibosian
  • Jan Tolan
  • Veda Ward
  • Alan Wright

Emeritus Faculty

  • John Bullaro
  • Byrne Fernelius
  • John Foley
  • George Welton
  • Robert Winslow

Programs

Undergraduate:

  • B.S., Recreation
  • Minor in Recreation

Graduate

  • M.S. Recreation

Mission Statement

The Department of Recreation and Tourism Management of California State University, Northridge provides a challenging, student learning centered educational experience that prepares professionals with a commitment to enhancing the quality of life through recreation, leisure and play.

The Major

The Department of Recreation and Tourism Management prepares students for full-time entry level positions in a wide range of career settings. The major emphasizes the importance of high quality recreation, tourism, and play experiences as a means for improving the quality of life of individuals, families, local communities, and organizations. The Department of Recreation and Tourism Management offers many exciting general education courses as well as the professional preparation major degree tracks. Students in the major develop leadership, planning and implementation skills, and knowledge necessary to be prepared to successfully meet the challenging career settings of the 21st century. Many of our B.S. degree graduates go on to enter our Graduate Degree Programs for those career paths that require advanced study.

Recreation Management Option (B.S. Degree Program): A critical element in working in the global market today is understanding and working comfortably with diverse groups. Recreation professionals can make a difference in the quality of life for all citizens by encouraging and facilitating the positive use of leisure time, whether that is while at home, traveling, engaging in recreation, recreational sport, or entertainment. The Recreation Management has been developed to educate students in leisure and play theory, event planning, leadership, management, and working with diverse groups while embracing the need to understand the sustainability of resources needed while participating in leisure time pursuits.. Students complete practicum and internship experiences in various leisure service settings in the for-profit, government and non-profit sectors.

The Minor

This program provides a basic framework of skills and understandings in the function, structure and process of leisure and recreation services as described in the B.S. Degree programs. Students completing the minor will be able to perform such services in support of professional roles in related fields.

Careers

Recreation and Tourism Management graduates have many career paths within the human services industries to pursue. Included in this vast array of career opportunities are: Adventure Travel Coordinators, Hotel Management, Tour Guides and Interpreters, Sustainable Destination Specialists, Convention Coordinators, Cruise Ship Activity Directors, Event Planners and Coordinators, Recreational Sport and Entertainment Facility Management/Marketing and Customer Relations, Entrepreneurs, Intramural/Campus Recreational Sport and Campus Life Directors.

Other graduates chose paths in the Outdoors, Municipal Recreation and Non-Profit Sectors of the profession. These professional areas offer careers as Recreation Therapy Specialists, Recreation Center Directors, Recreation Center Specialists, Outdoor Education Specialists, Camp Directors, Nature Interpreters, Aquatic Specialists, Play Center Facilitation/Directors, and Employee Recreation Services and Sport Directors.

Finally, other graduates find fulfilling careers in professional settings such as Military Recreation, Correctional Recreation, Campus Student Unions, Religious Youth Recreation, Fund Development, Community Youth Recreation and Sport Agencies, and Recreation Therapy.

Academic Advisement

Recreation and Tourism Management faculty listed above are available each semester for academic advisement prior to registration. Meeting with a faculty member of your choice who has the expertise that represents your career objectives is encouraged, and can take place during their regular faculty office hours. The undergraduate advisors are Mechelle Best, Craig Finney, Dianne Philibosian and Jan Tolan and Al Wright. Graduate advisors are Mechelle Best and Craig Finney.

Upon completion of the academic advisement session, students’ “registration hard hold” is lifted and students then may participate in the registration process as scheduled by the University.

Student Learning Outcomes of the Undergraduate Program

  • 1. Students will demonstrate critical thinking including analysis, synthesis and evaluation in the fields of play, leisure, recreation, parks and/or tourism through a variety of pedagogies.
  • 2. Students will practice and self-assess progress toward mastery of the standards and competencies of appropriate accrediting bodies through continual self-assessment and portfolio development.
  • 3. Students will demonstrate application and integration of theoretical knowledge in a practical setting through 600 hours of professional internship in preparation for pursuing employment.
  • 4. Students will demonstrate an increase in Emotional Intelligence while pursuing their degree(s) objectives as measured by an Emotional Intelligence survey instrument at point of entry and exit from the degree program.

Requirements for Bachelor of Science Degree

Grade Requirements for Core Classes

Undergraduate majors in Recreation and Tourism Management are required to earn a grade of C or better in each of the core classes for the units to be counted as progress toward a degree.

Each class can be repeated once to improve the grade. Subsequent retakes must be appealed to the Department of Recreation and Tourism faculty. First Aid and CPR certification (non-online) required at time of graduation.

Professional Preparation Opportunities

Professional learning experiences are offered students throughout the program. Experiential education and community service learning opportunities are included in coursework. Students are provided the opportunity to engage in a wide variety of leisure organizations including recreational and human service agencies.

Internship: All students enroll in a capstone 600 hour (6 units) senior internship. To ensure the highest quality internship experience possible, the department requires all students to have completed all 200 and 300 level courses prior to enrollment in the internship program. However it is strongly encouraged that the senior internship experience be taken as the culminating learning opportunity toward the B.S. degree. See your academic advisor for further requirements.

Students consult with faculty in their option regarding policies and procedures governing practical experience. Multiple professional certifications are both possible and encouraged through judicious selection of field placements and elective coursework.

Recreation Management (57 Units)

The Department is committed to providing a generalist framework from which students may seek one or more professional certifications. See advisor for specific career preparation patterns. Electives are selected in consultation with and approved by the departmental academic advisor.

1. Lower Division Core (9 Units)

  • RTM 278 Recreation and Leisure in Contemporary Society (3)
  • RTM 202/L Planning Programs and Events for the Recreational Experience and Lab (2/1)
  • RTM 204 Foundations of Recreation Therapy and Special Populations (3)

2. Upper Division Core (27 Units)

  • RTM 300 Recreation and Community Development (3)
  • RTM 302 Dynamics of Leadership in Recreation and Human Services (3)
  • RTM 303 Promotion of the Recreation Experience (3)
  • RTM 304 Entrepreneurial Ventures in Recreation and Human Services (3)
  • RTM 402 Models of Play, Recreation and Leisure (3)
  • RTM 403 Evaluation Research in Recreation and Human Services (3)
  • RTM 490 Challenges in Leisure Services Seminar (3)
  • RTM 494ABC Senior Internship (6)
3. Electives (15 Units)
  • RTM 251 Recreation and the Natural Environment (3)
  • RTM 280 Organizing Campus Recreation and Sport (3)
  • RTM 294CS/L Recreation Service Learning Theory and Practicum (1/2)
  • RTM 305 Dynamics of Early Childhood Play (3)
  • RTM 310/L Adventure Recreation and Human Relations and Lab (2/1)
  • RTM 314 Leisure Aspects of the Hospitality Industry (3)
  • RTM 330 Women, Leisure, and Ethnicity in the U.S. (3)
  • RTM 351 Practices of Outdoor and Environmental Education (3)
  • RTM 352 Play and Human Potential (3)
  • RTM 353/L Literature of the Wilderness Experience (2/1)
  • RTM 375A Recreation Therapy Programming and Adaptive Techniques (3)
  • RTM 375B Recreation Therapy Leadership and Programming (3)
  • RTM 405 Play and the Exceptional Child (3)
  • RTM 406/L Enhancing Childhood Creativity (2/1)
  • RTM 415 Leisure and Aging (3)
  • RTM 444 Nonprofit Organizations and Fund Development in Leisure and Human Services (3)
  • RTM 452/L Outdoor Recreation Leadership and Lab (3/2)
  • RTM 475 Recreation Therapy Process Management (3)
  • RTM 480 Recreational Tourism (3)
Up to 4 elective units may be selected from the following:
  • RTM 151A Backpacking (2)
  • RTM 151B Rock Climbing and Mountaineering (2)
  • RTM 151C Winter Mountaineering (2)
  • RTM 151D Flat-water Boating (2)
  • RTM 151E Whitewater Boating (2)
  • RTM 151F Survival (2)
  • RTM 151G Challenge/Ropes Courses (2)
  • RTM 151H Caving (2)
  • RTM 265 Water Skiing and Wakeboarding (1)
  • RTM 267/L Sailing (1/1)
Up to 3 elective units may be selected from the following:
  • RTM 398A Supervised Individual Project (1)
  • RTM 498A Field Assignment and Reports (1)
  • RTM 498B Field Assignment and Reports (2)
  • RTM 499A-C Independent Study (1-3)

Up to 6 elective units may be selected in career-related courses outside the department subject to the approval of the Departmental advisor.

  • Total Units in the Major
  • 57
  • General Education (Maximum Overlap 12 units)
  • 48
  • Additional Units
  • 15-27
  • Total Units Required for a B.A. Degree
  • 120

Minor in Recreation

1. Required Core (12 Units)

  • RTM 202/L Planning Programs and Events for the Recreational Experience and Lab (2/1)
  • RTM 204 Foundations of Therapeutic Recreation and Special Populations (3)
  • RTM 251 Recreation and the Natural Environment (3)
  • RTM 305 Dynamics of Childhood Play (3)
  • or RTM 352 Play and Human Potential (3)

2. Electives (12 Units)

Selected from the following courses:
  • RTM 280 Organizing Campus Recreation and Sport (3)
  • RTM 294CS/L
  • Recreation Service Learning Theory and Practicum (1/2)
  • RTM 300 Recreation and Community Development (3)
  • RTM 302
  • Dynamics of Leadership in Recreation and Human Services (3)
  • RTM 305 Dynamics of Early Childhood Play (3)
  • RTM 314 Leisure Aspects of the Hospitality Industry (3)
  • RTM 351 Outdoor and Environmental Education (3)
  • RTM 352 Play and Human Potential (3)
  • RTM 405 Play and the Exceptional Child (3)
  • RTM 415 Leisure and Aging (3)
  • RTM 431 Leisure Education (3)
  • RTM 444 Nonprofit Organizations and Fund Development in Leisure/ Human Services (3)
  • RTM 480 Recreational Tourism: Issues and Trends (3)
  • Total Units Required for the Minor
  • 24

Master of Science Degree in Recreation

The master’s degree program is intended for persons interested in developing and/or improving their knowledge of recreational sport management or tourism management. It is designed for those seeking advancement in their career settings or a change in career settings. The selection of courses allows students to “specialize” in either: a) Recreational Sport/Campus Recreation Management or b) Tourism Management. Students progress through the program as a cohort and are actively engaged in courses and internships on evenings and weekends.

Requirements for Admission to the Program

Bachelor’s degree in Recreation, Hospitality, Travel and Tourism, Recreational Sport Management, or allied field(s). Students not so qualified must successfully complete a prescribed program with a grade point average of 3.0. University requirements must be met for promotion to classified status. Graduate admission fall only.

Requirements for Completion of the Program

Students will complete 15 units of required core classes, 12 units in their selected track (Recreational Sport Management or Tourism Management), and 3 units of approved electives for a total of 30 units. The core classes include 2 internship experiences of 2 units each. A 2 unit directed comprehensive studies course (comprehensive examination) based on the internship experiences is the culminating experience for the degree and will be completed during the last semester of enrollment in the program. Students also have the option of completing a graduate project or theses. A grade of “B” or better in each graduate course is required for the units be counted as progress toward degree requirements.

1. Required Courses For All Graduate Majors (15 Units)

  • RTM 540 Human Resources in Recreational Sport and Tourism (3)
  • RTM 550 Marketing and Promotion in Recreational Sport and Tourism (3)
  • GBUS 502 Seminar in Managerial Finance/Accounting (3)
  • RTM 693A Supervised Internship I (2)
  • RTM 693B Supervised Internship II (2)
  • RTM 697 Directed Comprehensive Studies (2)
  • or RTM 698 Graduate Project or Thesis (2)
Seminars For Recreational Sport Graduate Majors (12 Units)
  • RTM 520 Trends and Issues in Recreational Sport (3)
  • RTM 560 Facility Design in Recreational Sport (3)
  • RTM 600 Law, Risk Management and Ethics in Recreational Sport (3)
  • RTM 620 Organizational Theory in Recreational Sport (3) Seminars For Hospitality, Travel And Tourism Graduate Majors (12 Units)
  • RTM 510 Trends and Issues in Hospitality and Tourism (3)
  • RTM 530 Cultural Aspects and Global Perspectives in Tourism (3)
  • RTM 580 Seminar in Tourism Planning: A Cultural and International Perspective (3)
  • RTM 610 Ecotourism (3)

2. Electives (3 Units, According To Specialization)

To be chosen with the approval of the graduate faculty advisor.

Course List

RTM 150. Introduction to Outdoor Education in the Backcountry (1)
Restricted to Kinesiology Majors. Introduction to safe backcountry camping and travel, including elements of trip preparation, cross-country navigation, effects of environmental conditions of cold, heat, and altitude on the human body, nutrition and environmental hazards. Emphasis on safety, environmental awareness and minimizing environmental impact. Arranged field trips are required.
RTM 151A. Backpacking (2)
Introduction to backpacking as an outdoor pursuit. Emphasis on proper use of equipment and safety of participants in the natural environment. This course is designed to give students a general overview of and experience in backpacking and spending time in the backcountry. Arranged field trips are required.
RTM 151B. Rock Climbing and Mountaineering (2)
Basic elements of rock climbing, mountaineering and alpine travel will be examined, including climbing ethics, fitness and the physiological effects of environmental stress and work at high altitudes. Emphasis will be on safety, proper use of equipment, climbing technique and minimizing impacts on the natural environment. Arranged field trips are required.
RTM 151C. Winter Mountaineering (2)
Advanced instruction in mountaineering and travel in the backcountry, with particular emphasis on snow and ice climbing, avalanche prediction, physical effects of high altitudes and winter camping skills. Emphasis is on technique, proper use of equipment, environmental practices and safety. Arranged field trips are required.
RTM 151D. Flat-water Boating (2)
Introduction to safe travel by kayak or canoe on lakes, rivers, and oceans. Includes equipment, navigation and techniques for flat-water boating and emergency self-rescue. Emphasis will be on safety, environmental awareness, and skill development. Arranged field trips are required.
RTM 151E. Whitewater Boating (2)
Advanced instruction on travel by kayak, canoe or raft on lakes, rivers, or oceans. Includes techniques for whitewater boating, analysis of water hydraulics, equipment, navigation and emergency self-rescue. Emphasis will be on safety, environmental awareness, and skill development. Arranged field trips are required.
RTM 151F. Survival (2)
Studies in the skills essential for wilderness survival in a variety of physical environments. Includes topics of shelters, water, navigation and edible plants and animals. Emphasis on techniques with primitive technologies, environmental conservation, and safety. Arranged field trips are required.
RTM 151G. Challenge/Ropes Courses (2)
Introduction to the safe operation of challenge/ropes course activities for outdoor experience. Emphasis on proper use of equipment and safety of both high and low component challenge courses. This course is designed to give students a general overview of and experience in the practice of group challenges utilizing initiatives and high ropes elements. Arranged field trips are required.
RTM 151H. Caving (2)
Introduction to the safe exploration of caves and the underground environment, including cave formations and features, techniques and special hazards. Emphasis on safety techniques for horizontal and vertical caves, environmental awareness, and skill development. Arranged field trips are required.
RTM 202/L. Planning Programs and Events for Recreation Experiences and Lab (2/1)
Prerequisite: Lower Division writing requirement; Corequisite: RTM 202L. Overview of the program and event planning process as it relates to the provision of human and leisure services through play, recreation, and leisure experiences for a variety of service recipients and settings. Lab experiences applying skills and principles addressed.
RTM 204. Introduction to Recreation Therapy (3)
Study of the nature and function of recreation in a variety of agencies and settings. Overview of the physical, cognitive, affective and social characteristics of a variety of individuals with special needs with emphasis on planning and adapting recreation programs both in clinical and community/inclusive settings. Participation in fieldwork is required.
RTM 251. Recreation and the Natural Environment (3)
Study of recreational use of outdoor/natural areas and the trends creating changing patterns of use. Overview of human, animal, and vehicular impacts on the outdoor recreation resources. (Available for General Education, Applied Arts and Sciences) (IC)
RTM 265. Water Skiing and Wakeboarding (1)
Prerequisite: Basic swimming skills. Develops proficiency in water skiing skills, including wakeboarding, with an emphasis on safety and the proper use of equipment.
RTM 267/L. Sailing and Lab (1/1)
Prerequisite: Elementary swimming skills. Corequisite: RTM 267L.Development of the skills and art of sailing, including the development of basic seamanship, small boat handling competency, safety procedures and regulations, and introductions to competitive sailing and ocean cruising. One hour lecture; two hours lab per week.
RTM 278. Recreation and Leisure in Contemporary Society (3)
Investigation of the contributions of play, leisure and recreation to the social, psychological and economic well being of individuals and groups; incorporating local, regional, national and international perspectives. Regular written assignments are required. Recreation and Tourism major requirement. (Available for General Education, Lifelong Learning)
RTM 280. Organizing Campus Recreation and Sport (3)
Overview of the concepts and applications for effective campus recreation and sport programming and administration. Of value to current and future leaders in the field of campus recreation and sport. Includes specific field observation experiences.
RTM 294CS/L. Recreation Service Learning Theory and Practicum and Lab (1/2)
Corequisite: RTM 294CSL.Service learning theory applied to the design, coordination, leadership, implementation, and evaluation of activities addressing the needs of campus and community-based individuals and groups, primarily in the greater Los Angeles area, coordinated by a department faculty member. Offers a community service opportunity with activities relating to concepts and theories presented in the course.
RTM 296A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in Recreation and Tourism Management (1-3)
Experimental courses in Recreation and Tourism Management with course content to be determined.Upper Division
RTM 300. Recreation and Community Development (3)
Prerequisite: Lower Division writing requirement. Examination of the multicultural dynamics of urban life and recreation’s role in building community and in developing youth capacity and indigenous leadership.
RTM 302. Dynamics of Leadership in Recreation and Human Services (3)
Prerequisites: Lower Division writing requirement.Includes an analysis of personal leadership theory and small-group dynamics, and a review of classic leadership studies with emphasis on leadership values and methods including group dynamics, communication, decision making, and motivation. Emphasis on competencies and skills needed for successful leadership of small groups. Experiential components are an integral part of class design. Field trip experiences required.
RTM 303. Promotion of the Recreation Experience (3)
Interpretation and promotion of recreation programs and services through the use of media processes and resources, marketing principles, and computer applications.
RTM 304. Entrepreneurial Ventures in Recreation and Human Services (3)
Analysis of approaches and techniques necessary to initiate an entrepreneurial start-up recreation and human service arenas. Topics include the nature of entrepreneurialism, development of a business plan, organization of the enterprise, financial management, and operations management and computer applications.
RTM 305. Dynamics of Early Childhood Play (3)
Study of play in relation to the child’s early growth and development. Implications for functional, environmental, and leadership dimensions of organized play experiences in early years. Some sections of this course may offer a community service opportunity with activities relating to concepts and theories presented. Check the schedule of classes for the CS designation.
RTM 310/L. Adventure Recreation and Human Relations and Lab (2/1)
Prerequisite: Lower Division writing requirement. Corequisite: RTM 310L. Introduction to personal growth and adventure. Explores issues of identity, racial and ethnic diversity, gender, and self-esteem through readings, written assignments, and recitation. Regular written assignments required. Lab: Introduction to adventure recreation and diversity issues through group initiatives and participation in a shared adventure of ropes course activities. (Available for General Education, Lifelong Learning) (IC)
RTM 314. Leisure Aspects of the Hospitality Industry (3)
Study of the leisure experience in the context of the hospitality industry. A systems approach is used to study the design and organization of components of the hospitality industry intended to achieve leisure and recreation outcomes for guests and visitors.
RTM 330. Women, Leisure and Ethnicity in the United States (3)
Prerequisite: Lower Division writing requirement. Examines the relationship among women, ethnicity, and leisure; provides opportunities to investigate a variety of factors affecting women in the U.S. Regular written assignments required. Some sections of this course may offer a community service opportunity with activities relating to concepts and theories presented. Check the schedule of classes for the CS designation. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
RTM 351. Outdoor and Environmental Education (3)
Study of outdoor educational philosophy and methods as they apply to the outdoor educator. Includes the history, development, and basic principles of outdoor/ environmental education but emphasizes strategies for teaching, interpreting, and program planning in outdoor environments.
RTM 352. Play and Human Potential (3)
Prerequisite: Lower Division writing requirement. Examination of the play phenomenon across the lifespan. Exploration, analysis and evaluation of the play phenomenon in development of human potential. Regular written assignments are required. Some sections of this course may offer a community service opportunity with activities relating to concepts and theories presented. Check the schedule of classes for the CS designation. (Available for General Education, Lifelong Learning) (IC)
RTM 353/L. Literature of the Wilderness Experience and Lab (2/1)
Prerequisite: Lower Division writing requirement. Corequisite: RTM 353L.Review of the writings of various wilderness adventurers both past and present (such as Boone, Powell, Muir, Leopold and Abbey). Emphasis on assessing their experiences in the wilderness, their goals, and their methods. Regular written assignments are required. Lab: Allows students to personally experience some of the values of wilderness environments discussed in RTM 353. In addition, students develop personal goals (such as those sought by previous wilderness adventurers) to be achieved on arranged field trips to wilderness areas. (Available for General Education, Lifelong Learning)
RTM 375A. Recreation Therapy Practices and Adaptive Techniques (3)
Prerequisite: RTM 204. Corequisite: RTM 375B. Study and basic application of therapeutic approaches and adaptations of appropriate recreation therapy activities for diverse special needs populations. Participation in fieldwork is required.
RTM 375B. Recreation Therapy Leadership and Programming (3)
Prerequisite: RTM 204. Corequisite: RTM 375A.Study and application of teamwork, leadership, group dynamics, and programming with diverse special needs populations. Participation in fieldwork and arranged field trip is required.
RTM 396A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in Recreation and Tourism Management (3)
Experimental courses in Recreation and Tourism Management, with course content to be determined.
RTM 398A. Supervised Individual Projects (1-1)
Study and research in selected areas, with course content to be determined by faculty and student.
RTM 402. Models of Play, Leisure and Recreation (3)
Examines the historical, theoretical, and philosophical foundations of play, leisure, and recreation, and the relevance to the professional today. Explores how play theory and philosophy impact the provision of service to individuals across the lifespan and with diverse needs.
RTM 403. Evaluation Research in Recreation and Human Services (3)
Investigation into the fields and methods of recreation and leisure systems, including special techniques and concepts of research as applicable to these systems.
RTM 405. Play and the Exceptional Child (3)
Alternative approaches to traditional play techniques for the exceptional child.
RTM 406/L. Enhancing Childhood Creativity and Lab (2/1)
Corequisite: RTM 406L. Integrative seminar and lab experience focusing on the theoretical approaches for enhancing childhood creativity. The uses of play and fantasy are explored as the means for developing programs which are child oriented. Regular written assignments are required. (Cross-listed with CADV 406/L)
RTM 415. Leisure and Aging (3)
Study of the psycho-social aspects of aging as related to leisure and recreation. Implications for functional environmental and leadership dimensions of leisure and recreation experiences in the later years. Some sections of this course may offer a community service opportunity with activities relating to concepts and theories presented. Check the schedule of classes for the CS designation.
RTM 444. Nonprofit Organizations and Fund Development in Leisure and Human Services (3)
Historical survey of the development of the volunteer movement and its leisure function in American society; theory of voluntary participation and philanthropy; structure and function of volunteer boards; analysis of fund raising organization and techniques.
RTM 475. Recreation Therapy Process Management (3)
Prerequisites: RTM 204; 375A; 375B.In-depth approach to recreation therapy treatment/care plan and protocol development. Examination of management issues related to recreation therapy. Case studies utilized throughout the course. Participation in fieldwork is required.
RTM 480. Recreational Tourism: Issues and Trends (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of lower division writing requirement.Study of the phenomena of domestic and international recreational tourism. Emphasis on investigating and understanding the variables that impact recreational tourism and travel destination areas. Regular written assignments are required.
RTM 490. Challenges in Leisure Services Seminar (3)
Analytical approach to theories and principles of recreation, leisure, and play as they relate to field observations and practical applications.
RTM 494A-C. Supervised Internship (1-3)
Prerequisite: Senior standing.Supervised internship in professional recreation settings. (Credit/No Credit Only)
RTM 496A-Z Experimental Topics Courses in Recreation and Tourism Management (3)
Experimental courses in Recreation and Tourism Management with course content to be determined.
RTM 498A-B. Field Assignment and Reports (1-2)
Analysis and reports of the student’s study project in a field site location.
RTM 499A-C. Independent Study (1-3)

Graduate Courses

RTM 510. Trends and Issues in Hospitality and Tourism (3)
Preparatory: RTM 314 or RTM 480. Addresses current trends and future projections in the industry from multiple perspectives: economic, psychological, cultural and social.
RTM 520. Trends and Issues in Recreational Sport (3)
Identification and analysis of current trends, challenges, and issues that affect management of recreational sport facilities and programs. An examination of history of the profession, current professional and research issues, along with anticipation and preparation for the future.
RTM 530. Cultural Aspects and Global Perspectives in Tourism (3)
Preparatory: RTM 314 or RTM 480. Addresses issues culture as it is affected by tourism. We will examine issues of authenticity, co modification of culture and the interaction of hosts and guests in different contexts, ranging from the industrialized world to developing countries.
RTM 540. Human Resources in Recreational Sport and Tourism (3)
Provides an understanding and application of key concepts/practices in human resource management as related to the recreational sport and tourism industries.
RTM 550. Marketing and Promotions in Recreational Sport and Tourism (3)
An in depth study of the theory and application of marketing and promotions as they related to the recreational sport and tourism industries.
RTM 560. Facility Design in Recreational Sport (3)
Investigation of principles of design, planning, management and operation of recreational sport facilities. Students will be introduced to facility and event management, facility components, specifications, recreation spaces, specialty areas, and facility trends.
RTM 561. Seminar in Recreation and Sport Theory and Management (3)
Advanced study of contemporary problems involved in the administrative organization of leisure service and sport management agencies.
RTM 570. Futures Research and Planning for Leisure Services (3)
In-depth investigation into futures literature and research designs and methodologies and how they relate to recreation and leisure services planning for the future.
RTM 580. Seminar in Tourism Planning: A Cultural and International Perspective (3)
Analysis and evaluation of the impact of historical tourism planning trends and their influence on human services and quality of life issues. Advanced study of the application of contemporary tourism planning models.
RTM 595A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses (1-3)
RTM 600. Law, Risk Management and Ethics in Recreational Sport (3)
Exploration of legal principles, risk management and ethics affecting the management of recreational sport programs. Emphasis will be placed on the rules of law, negligence and risk management theory, constitutional law, contracts and legislation.
RTM 602. Theoretical Foundations of Leisure and Play (3)
In-depth investigation into the theoretical foundations basic to the profession of leisure and play; and an analysis of current issues from the perspective of these diverse theoretical positions.
RTM 608. Consultation in Leisure Services (3)
Theory, analysis and application of concepts and strategies of consultation as applied to Leisure Service personnel working in field settings. In-depth exploration of the application of consulting techniques to practical situations.
RTM 610. Ecotourism (3)
Preparatory: RTM 314 or 480. Addresses issues of sustainability as they pertain to tourism. Traditionally, tourism has operated with a short-term perspective and has been largely consumptive in nature. Students will learn and understand the issues of sustainability and how ecotourism principles are or are not effective in certain regions.
RTM 620. Organizational Theory in Recreational Sport (3)
Application of organizational theory in the context of the recreational sport industry.
RTM 642. Seminar in Current Issues and Trends in Therapeutic Recreation (3)
Completion of undergraduate course work in Recreation Therapy. Comprehensive study and analysis of the issues and trends affecting the delivery of therapeutic recreation in clinical and community settings.
RTM 644. Seminar in Evaluation and Documentation in Therapeutic Recreation (3)
Completion of undergraduate coursework in Recreation Therapy. Comprehensive study and analysis of evaluation and documentation methods related to the delivery of therapeutic recreation services.
RTM 665. Inter-Organizational Strategies for Leisure Agencies (3)
Study of leisure agencies and their relationships within communities, and through various levels of organization. Emphasis on the strategies for sharing scarce resources.
RTM 684. Advanced Research Method and Design (3)
Prerequisite: RTM 403 or equivalent. Application of research techniques to recreation and parks problems. Procedures in collection, analysis, and presentation of data; utilization of findings. Lecture-lab.
RTM 693A. Supervised Internship I (2)
Prerequisite: Instructor approval.First of two supervised internships requiring completion of 200 hours in an approved setting in recreational sport management or hospitality, travel and tourism. The supervised internship is designed to provide a hands-on learning experience in management of recreational sport or tourism. The internship will be used as a basis for the culminating graduate project or thesis to be completed during the last semester of enrollment in the graduate program.
RTM 693B. Supervised Internship II (2)
Prerequisite: Instructor approval. Second of two supervised internships requiring completion of 200 hours in an approved setting in recreational sport management or hospitality, travel and tourism. The supervised internship is designed to provide a hands-on learning experience in management of recreational sport or tourism. The second internship should expand and provide further growth based on the first internship experience; whether that be in the same organization or a different one. The internship will be used as a basis for the culminating graduate project or thesis to be completed during the last semester of enrollment in the graduate program.
RTM 697. Directed Comprehensive Studies (2.
This course is for students to enroll in during the preparation and examination phase of their MS Degree. This course will allow students to review and synthesize the information learned during the program, reflect and assess the level of mastery attained, prepare preparatory case studies, and complete their culminating examination. Students will be expected to develop links between the various courses, and, during the course of the exam, apply this integrated information to develop answers to current problems in the field. (Credit /No Credit only.)
RTM 698. Graduate Project or Thesis (2)
Prerequisite: Instructor Approval. Culminating experience for the graduate degree. Planning, preparation and completion of a graduate project or thesis on an advanced topic in the field of recreational sport management or hospitality, travel and tourism.
RTM 699. Independent Study (1-3)
Prerequisite: Consent of graduate coordinator. Intensive investigation into the area of specialization.