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Psychology

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College of Social and Behavioral Sciences

  • Chair: Carrie Saetermoe
  • Sierra Hall (SH) 376
  • (818) 677-2827
  • www.csun.edu/psychology/

Faculty

  • Andrew Ainsworth
  • Tyler Blake
  • Gabriela Chavira
  • Sheila Grant
  • Sun-Mee Kang
  • Gary Katz
  • Ellie Kazemi
  • Luciana Laganá
  • Howard Lee
  • Debra Berry Malmberg
  • Bradley McAuliff
  • Maura Mitrushina
  • Shannon Morgan
  • Janet Oh
  • Mark Otten
  • Scott Plunkett
  • Jill Quilici
  • Jill Razani
  • Abraham Rutchick
  • Carrie Saetermoe
  • Mark Sergi
  • Jerry Shaw
  • Dee Shepherd-Look
  • Paul Skolnick
  • Holli Tonyan
  • Michele Wittig
  • Erica Wohldmann
  • Robert Youmans

Emeritus Faculty:

  • S. Joyce Brotsky
  • Donald Butler
  • Karla Butler
  • Robert Dear
  • Richard Docter
  • Ronald Doctor
  • Jean Elbert
  • Linda Fidell
  • Helen Giedt
  • Donna Hardy
  • Alice Hawkins
  • Melvin Hoffman
  • Patricia Keith-Spiegel
  • William Knowles
  • Brennis Lucero-Wagoner
  • James McMartin
  • Benjamin Mehlman
  • Joseph Morris
  • Roger Moss
  • Samuel Moss
  • Samuel Pinneau
  • Leo Pirojnikoff
  • Edward Sampson
  • Mark Sanders
  • Ruth Sydney Segel
  • Richard W. Smith
  • Stanley Summers
  • James Torcivia
  • Nora Weckler

Programs

Undergraduate:

  • B.A., Psychology
  • Minor in Psychology

Graduate:

  • M.A., Psychology
  • Option in Clinical Psychology
  • Option in General Experimental Psychology
  • Option in Human Factors & Applied Psychology

Mission Statement

The vision of the Department of Psychology is summed up in one word: “Relevance.” The Department of Psychology, housed in a college serving one of the world’s most diverse urban regions, is committed to excellence in teaching, research, and service to the community. Our mission is to provide students with a strong academic background in psychology, as well as to help them develop professional competence.

We encourage our students to develop critical thinking skills, creative abilities, interpersonal skills, ethical values, and integrity in an inclusive community in which teaching and mentoring of students is valued. Our courses encourage scholarship, intellectual inquiry, professional achievement, and service to the community. Our students acquire many skills through fieldwork and service learning as well as involvement in research projects guided by our faculty. We encourage students to gain knowledge and comprehension of the theories, concepts, and empirical approaches used in psychology and their application to the human condition. Our program offers a broad spectrum of theoretical approaches including biological, developmental, behavioral, individual and social systems as well as learning and cognitive processes. As part of their academic training, our students gain knowledge and understanding of research methodology and the statistical analysis of empirical data. Through the Department’s commitment to applied social science research, our students obtain the critical core skills necessary to meet the needs of the region, as well as to be competitive in the multicultural market place as either members of the workforce, or as graduate students.

The Major

Major in Psychology. The course of study and the requirements for the B.A. degree in Psychology provide an opportunity for students who (a) desire to extend their education in the liberal arts with an emphasis in psychology, (b) wish to prepare themselves for graduate work in psychology, (c) plan to enter one of several professional or occupational fields for which a substantial background in psychology is essential.

Minors Associated with Psychology:

  • 1. Minor in Psychology. Students whose major is in another area may complete a minor in psychology, selecting coursework which complements their major field. Consult a psychology undergraduate advisor for details.
  • 2. Interdisciplinary Minor in Human Sexuality. Students wishing to develop an undergraduate specialization in this area may complete a part of their coursework in psychology. Consult the Human Sexuality section of this catalog for details.
  • 3. Interdisciplinary Minor in Gerontology. Students interested in the processes of aging or careers in gerontology should consider this minor. Consult the Gerontology section of this catalog for details.

Student Learning Outcomes of the Undergraduate Program

  • 1. Students will demonstrate sufficient communication skills by (a) communicating thoughts, arguments, and research work in writing using the tone, grammar, and organization appropriate to professional work in psychology and (b) demonstrating effective oral communication skills in group discussions and class presentations.
  • 2. Students will demonstrate effective collaboration with team members in group activities such as projects, recruiting research participants, collecting data, presenting research findings and/or working in research labs.
  • 3. Students will demonstrate competence in electronic and information technologies by (a) using computational and statistical software, (b) using computers to review abstracts appearing in relevant databases and obtaining full-text versions of the literature relevant to a research topic, (c) paraphrasing, quoting, and citing appropriate sources to avoid plagiarism and (d) effectively using the American Psychological Association (APA) Style Manual.
  • 4. Students will demonstrate critical thinking skills and skeptical inquiry by evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of current research literature and/or their own research using psychological research methodology.
  • 5. Students will demonstrate sufficient use of statistical analysis, interpretation, and presentation of psychological data.
  • 6. Students will demonstrate appropriate and ethical use of human participants by going through the process of participant recruitment and debriefing human participants involved in psychological research.
  • 7. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the theories, concepts, and empirical approaches of psychology from diverse perspectives, including biological processes, developmental processes, individual and social processes, learning and cognitive processes.
  • 8. Students will demonstrate personal, sociocultural and international awareness.
  • 9. Students will demonstrate and apply appropriate knowledge and skills in professional practice through community service and/or research practica.

Careers

Most careers in psychology require graduate study at the master’s or doctoral level. However, there are increasing opportunities in business, education, and health care for bachelor’s level psychologists. Appropriate master’s degree programs can lead to a wide range of careers including school psychology, behavior analysis, business applications (human factors psychology and industrial-organizational psychology), clinical psychology (if one receives appropriate education and obtains a license), as well as a variety of other careers found in school settings (counseling, testing, research, and administration), community mental health clinics, prevention and/or high risk programs for health/lifestyle issues, and programs using applied behavior analysis, rehabilitation centers, and other health facilities. Psychologists are also employed by nearly all levels of governmental agencies, such as the Department of Education, the Department of Veteran’s Affairs, the Department of Defense, the Department of Health and Human Services, as well as state, county, and local mental health services. Psychologists who receive their doctorate may become professors, researchers, consultants, public policy analysts, and licensed clinical psychologists.

Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA®) Program

The Psychology Department’s BCBA Program at CSUN has been approved by the BACB® to meet the course work requirements for eligibility for the board certification exam. Candidates who do not yet have a master’s degree may apply to the Psychology Department’s Master’s Program in Clinical Psychology. The BCBA Program is comprised of five 3-unit graduate-level courses and two 1-unit preparatory courses within a seventeen unit program (255 classroom hours) formulated to address the Content Areas detailed by the Board. Consult the program website for details about the program, answers to frequently asked questions, application procedures and requirements for admission (http://tsengcollege.csun.edu/bcba/bcba.html).

Academic Advisement

Contact undergraduate advisors Robert Park and Michelle Street at (818) 677-2952. For graduate program advisement call (818) 677-2827.

Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts Degree

1. Lower Division Required Courses (10 Units)

  • MATH 140 Introductory Statistics (4)
  • PSY 150 Principles of Human Behavior (3)
  • PSY 250 Physiological Correlates of Human Behavior (3)*

* A score of 151 or higher on the English Placement Test is prerequisite to PSY 250.

Supporting courses in biology, mathematics, philosophy, and the social sciences are recommended, but not required.

2. Lower Division Electives

Lower Division courses other than those specified as required do not count toward a major in psychology. These courses exist to inform students about topics of special interest and will count toward the total units required for graduation.

3. Upper Division Required Courses (26 Units)

Note that Completion of the Lower Division Writing Requirement is prerequisite to all 300-level courses. Students are advised to complete the Lower Division Writing Requirement and to take PSY 301, 320/L and 321/L early in their program because these courses are prerequisite to other upper division courses required in the major.

The following courses are required (9):
  • PSY 301 Pre-Professional Development in Psychology (1)
  • PSY 320/L Statistical Methods in Psychology and Lab (3/1)
  • PSY 321/L Research Methods in Psychology and Lab (3/1)

Breadth Requirement – One course from each of the following four core areas (Clusters) is required:

Cluster 1: Clinical/Personality Psychology (3)
One of the following courses is required:
  • PSY 310 Behavior Disorders (3)
  • PSY 351 Behavioral Psychology & Therapy (3)
  • PSY 353 Psychological Interventions (3)
  • PSY 370 Personality Psychology (3)
  • PSY 380 Psychology of Stress (3)

All courses in the Clinical/Personality Cluster cover the following Student Learning Objectives #1, 2, and 3, and at least 1 of the remaining objectives.

  • 1. Students will demonstrate knowledge of history, theoretical perspectives (e.g., psychodynamic, trait, humanistic, evolutionary) and research on determining individual differences in personality and the development and maintenance of adaptive and maladaptive behavior.
  • 2. Students will demonstrate knowledge and understanding assessment, diagnosis, or treatment in a cultural context.
  • 3. Students will demonstrate knowledge of specific standards of research and practice, established and maintained by the American Psychological Association.
  • 4. Students will demonstrate knowledge of assessment including test construction, testing standards, and various test domains (e.g., objective tests, projective tests, structured interviews, behavioral assessments).
  • 5. Students will demonstrate their understanding and ability to use classification and diagnostic systems (e.g., the DSM) for identifying specific psychopathologies in a multicultural environment.
  • 6. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the intervention and treatment options available for the various clinical disorders, including limitations in general and when applied to certain populations.
  • 7. Students will demonstrate understanding of the different influences determining individual differences and the development of psychopathology (e.g., biological/neurochemical, environmental/learning, cultural context).

Cluster 2: Cognitive Psychology (3)

One of the following courses is required:
  • PSY 304 Cognition and Instruction (3)
  • PSY 367 Cognitive Psychology (3)
  • PSY 369 Applied Cognition (3)
  • PSY 382 Principles of Human Factors (3)

All courses in the Cognitive Cluster cover the following Student Learning Objectives #1, 2, and 3, and at least 2 of the remaining

objectives.

  • 1. Students will demonstrate knowledge of key content areas in cognitive psychology including perception, attention, and the processes of encoding, storage, and retrieval of information.
  • 2. Students will demonstrate knowledge of at least one area of complex cognitive processes including language, imagery, consciousness, metacognition, creativity, reasoning, problem solving, and decision-making.
  • 3. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the variety of methods used to study human cognition (e.g., reaction time, brain imaging, error analysis, and performance accuracy).
  • 4. Students will demonstrate knowledge of major approaches to study of human cognition including the constructivist approach, information processing, parallel distributed processing, and cognitive neuroscience.
  • 5. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the variety of influences on human cognition including biology/genetics, the environment, and the cultural context.
  • 6. Students will demonstrate knowledge about changes in cognition over the course of the human lifespan.
Cluster 3: Developmental Psychology (3)
One of the following courses is required:

PSY 313 Developmental Psychology (3)

PSY 327 Infancy and Early Childhood (3)

PSY 335 Middle Childhood (3)

PSY 361 Adolescence (3)

PSY 365 Gerontology (3)

All courses in the Developmental Cluster cover the following Student Learning Objectives #1, 2, and 3, and at least 2 of the remaining

objectives.

  • 1. Students will demonstrate knowledge of key changes in development during specific periods of the life span.
  • 2. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the variety of influences on human development, including biology/genetics, the environment, and the cultural context.
  • 3. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the variety of methods used to study human development (e.g., longitudinal, cross-sectional).
  • 4. Students will demonstrate knowledge of and apply major approaches to the study of human development (e.g., biological/maturation, environmental/learning, constructivist, cultural context).
  • 5. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the distinction between quantitative and qualitative changes in human development.
  • 6. Students will demonstrate knowledge of individual differences in human development.
  • 7. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the plasticity of human development.
Cluster 4: Social Psychology (3)
The following course is required:
  • PSY 345 Social Psychology (3)

All courses in the Social Cluster cover the following Student Learning Objective #1, and at least one of the remaining objectives.

  • 1. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the various research methods used by social psychologists.
  • 2. Students will demonstrate knowledge of key concepts in social thinking—how we view ourselves and others—such as the accuracy of impressions, intuitions, and explanations.
  • 3. Students will demonstrate knowledge of key concepts in social influence—how our behavior is changed by others—such as persuasion, conformity, and attitudes.
  • 4. Students will demonstrate knowledge of key concepts in social relations—how we interact with others–such as attraction, aggression, helping, and discrimination.
Capstone Requirement (3/2)
One of the following is required:
  • PSY 471AA-ZZ/S Advanced Inquiry in Clinical/Personality Psychology and Seminar (3/2)
  • PSY 473AA-ZZ/S Advanced Inquiry in Neuroscience and Seminar (3/2)
  • PSY 475AA-ZZ/S Advanced Inquiry in Developmental Psychology and Seminar (3/2)
  • PSY 479AA-ZZ/S Advanced Inquiry in Social Psychology and Seminar (3/2)
  • PSY 485AA-ZZ/S Advanced Inquiry in Research & Analysis Methods and Seminar (3/2)
  • PSY 488AA-ZZ/S Advanced Inquiry in Cognitive Psychology and Seminar (3/2)
  • All Advanced Inquiry capstone courses cover the following Student Learning Objectives:
  • 1. Students will demonstrate the ability to generate a researchable question.
  • 2. Students will plan and execute a design for research to answer that question (either generating new data or analyzing previously collected data).
  • 3. Students will compile, analyze, evaluate and interpret information relevant to their question (including previously published literature).
  • 4. Students will effectively communicate information in oral, written and graphic forms.
  • 5. Students will evaluate the possibilities for using findings relevant to their research for use in solving real world problems.
  • 6. Students will recognize and address ethical concerns relevant to their research and the previously published literature.

4. Upper Division Electives (6 Units or More)

Electives may include the above upper division courses not taken to satisfy other requirements or any 300- or 400-level courses

in the Department of Psychology. Students may not double count the above courses as required courses and elective courses. No more than

6 units combined total of PSY 498 (Practicum) and/or PSY 499 (Independent Study) may be counted toward the major. No more than 6 units of each, PSY 498 and PSY 499 (12 units total) may be counted toward the BA degree. Please note that the number of units in psychology must total at least 42 units; transfer credit for courses that reflect fewer units than those at CSUN must be compensated for in upper division psychology elective units.

General Education: PSY 150 (Principles of Human Behavior) and MATH 140 (Introductory Statistics) satisfy both GE and major requirements. Students of Psychology are not exempt from any sections of the General Education program.

  • Total Units in the Major
  • 42
  • General Education Units
  • 48
  • Additional Units
  • 30
  • Total Units Required for the Degree
  • 120

Minor in Psychology

1. Lower Division Required Courses (6 Units)

  • PSY 150 Principles of Human Behavior (3)
  • PSY 250 Physiological Correlates of Human Behavior (3)

2. Upper Division Required Courses (12 Units)

Breadth Requirement – One course from each of the following four core areas (Clusters) is required:

Cluster 1: Clinical/Personality Psychology
One of the following is required:
  • PSY 310 Behavior Disorders (3)
  • PSY 351 Behavioral Psychology & Therapy (3)
  • PSY 353 Psychological Interventions (3)
  • PSY 370 Personality Psychology (3)
  • PSY 380 Psychology of Stress (3)
Cluster 2: Cognitive Psychology
One of the following is required:
  • PSY 304 Cognition and Instruction (3)
  • PSY 367 Cognitive Psychology (3)
  • PSY 369 Applied Cognitive Psychology (3)
  • PSY 382 Principles of Human Factors (3)
Cluster 3: Developmental Psychology
One of the following is required:
  • PSY 313 Developmental Psychology (3)
  • PSY 327 Infancy and Early Childhood (3)
  • PSY 335 Middle Childhood (3)
  • PSY 361 Adolescence (3)
  • PSY 365 Gerontology (3)
Cluster 4: Social Psychology
The following is required:
  • PSY 345 Social Psychology

3. Upper Division Electives (3 Units)

Requirements for the M.A. in Psychology

The Department of Psychology offers advanced training in three areas of psychology: 1) Clinical Psychology, 2) General Experimental Psychology, and 3) Human Factors and Applied Psychology. (School Psychology is an integrated program with the Department of Educational Psychology and Counseling. Persons interested in advanced training in school psychology should apply to the Department of Educational Psychology and Counseling in the College of Education.) Consult the Department of Psychology Graduate Handbook (www.csun.edu/psychology) for details about the graduate programs and procedures and requirements for admission.

A. Procedures and Requirements for Admission:

Department deadlines for application are February 15 for Fall admission (Clinical Psychology, and General Experimental Psychology, Human Factors and Applied Psychology) and November 1 for Spring admission (General Experimental and Human Factors only). The Departmental Application Form (available from the Psychology Graduate Office or www.csun.edu/psychology) should be submitted to the Psychology Graduate Office by the above deadlines. Transcripts, letters of recommendation and, in some cases, personal interviews are required. Early application, careful study of the Department of Psychology Graduate Handbook and of the University Catalog, and consultation with the graduate advisor are strongly recommended.

B. Classified Admission and Conditionally Classified Admission:

Participation in any of the graduate programs offered by the Department of Psychology is limited to Classified and Conditionally Classified graduate students. Conditionally Classified Admission, used sparingly by the Department, is for students who have met all requirements for admission to the graduate program except for completion of a course or examination. The Department specifies the conditions to be fulfilled before classified standing is awarded. Normally, these conditions must be met within the first semester of graduate training.

C. For Admission to Classified Graduate Status

  • 1. Admission to any of the three graduate programs, except as noted in the Department of Psychology Graduate Handbook, generally requires an undergraduate major in psychology. Applicants who do not have a major in psychology are required to complete certain undergraduate courses prior to acceptance to classified status. Those who do not have a major in psychology should study the Graduate Handbook and consult with the appropriate graduate program coordinator about these requirements.
  • 2. A grade point average of 3.0 is required except on approval by the graduate committee of the program to which admission is sought. Enrollment is limited; it is not possible to admit all of the qualified students who apply.
  • 3. Completion of the general test and the advanced psychology test of the Graduate Record Examination is required, with satisfactory scores as prescribed by the graduate committee of the option in which degree work is to be taken. In certain programs, persons with appropriate undergraduate preparation may request waiver of the requirement for the advanced psychology test.
  • 4. Personal interview, prior experience in applied work and satisfactory letters of recommendation are required by some programs. Consult the Department of Psychology Graduate Handbook.
  • 5. General University requirements must also be met. Carefully consult other sections of this catalog for details. These requirements include the passage of the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam with a score of 8 or higher (UDWPE).

The Master of Arts Options in Psychology

A. Clinical Psychology

Clinical psychology emphasizes theory and practice in psychological assessment and psychological interventions together with the study of research methods and program evaluation. Students participate in fieldwork placements in clinical settings in our on-campus Community Services Center in Monterey Hall as well as in off-campus placements. In addition, students may opt to engage in independent research programs leading to graduate theses. This Program is designed for students aspiring to enter doctoral programs in clinical psychology and for those seeking master’s level clinical and research skills. Taken alone, it is not intended as preparation for the independent, unrestricted private practice of clinical psychology, which requires a doctoral-level license in California and in most other states. (Note: The Clinical Psychology Program is not a Marriage and Family Therapy (MFT) program. CSUN’s MFT program is offered by the Department of Educational Psychology and Counseling.) The clinical psychology program requires students to complete a minimum of 48 units.

1. Required Courses (33 Units)

Clinical Psychology (6 units)
  • PSY 595A-Z Experimental Topics in Psychology (3)
  • PSY 605 Introduction to Health Psychology (3)
Advanced Psychopathology (6 units)
  • PSY 610A Advanced Psychopathology - Child (3)
  • PSY 610B Advanced Psychopathology - Adult (3)
Psychological Assessment (8 units)
  • PSY 625C/L Child/Adolescent Psychological Assessment and Lab (3/1)
  • PSY 625D/L Adult Psychological Assessment and Lab (3/1)
Advanced Psychotherapy Techniques (6 units)
  • PSY 628 Fundamentals of Psychotherapy (3)
  • PSY 629 Seminar in Behavior Modification (3)
Advanced Statistics and Research Design (7 units)
  • PSY 420/L Advanced Statistical Methods and Lab (3/1)
  • PSY 692 Seminar in Research Methodology (3)
Fieldwork (9-15 units)
  • PSY 655A-Z Fieldwork in Psychological Services* (1-5)

Students must enroll in a minimum of 9 units of PSY 655(A-Z) as shown in the course sequence. This requires participation in our on-campus or off-campus clinical fieldwork placements. Students electing not to complete a master’s level thesis must enroll in an additional 6 units of PSY 655 Fieldwork beyond the 9 unit minimum for a total of 15 units of fieldwork.

*May be repeated (up to 4 semesters) and taken for a varying number of units (1-5).

Thesis or Graduate Project (6 units)

PSY 698C Thesis or Graduate Project (3-3)

Students may elect to complete a master’s level thesis or project as part of their degree requirements. Specific academic, formatting, and oral defense requirements are found in the Department of Psychology Graduate Handbook. Students who elect not to complete a master’s level thesis or project are required to enroll in an additional 6 units of fieldwork beyond the 9 unit required fieldwork experience.

2. Comprehensive Examination and Final Oral Examination, Deadlines and Grade Requirements

  • a. Comprehensive Examination: Students opting out of a research thesis will enroll in PSY 697 and will complete a comprehensive examination in their second year of study as their culminating experience. The examination is conducted by the graduate committee of the area in which the student specializes. For further information, consult the Department of Psychology Graduate Handbook or graduate advisor.
  • b. Final Oral Examination (Thesis option only): Students electing to complete a master’s thesis will take an area examination in their second year and will have their thesis defense as their culminating experience. Candidates for the M.A. degree must pass an examination in the area of their specialization. This exam is primarily based on the thesis and is scheduled 2 weeks after the final version of the thesis is presented to the graduate committee.
  • c. Total time allowed for completion of the entire program is 7 years from the time of acceptance. Students who intend to interrupt their program are expected to notify the department in writing to request prior approval. Those who fail to meet these requirements, or who fail to maintain a grade-point average of 3.0 or greater, are subject to being dropped from the program.

First year evaluation: An evaluation will be made at the conclusion of the first year encompassing all aspects of a student’s work to determine eligibility to proceed into the second year of the program.

  • Total Minimum Units Required for the M.A. Degree, Clinical Psychology
  • 48

B. General Experimental Psychology

Emphasizes basic theory and methodology in psychology. Following completion of core requirements, the student, in conference with a graduate advisor, may select an area of interest in psychology and set personal study objectives. Currently, some areas of interest in which specialized training is available are a) quantitative methods and research design, b) physiological psychology, c) learning and cognition, d) social psychology, e) developmental psychology. A rigorous program in General Experimental Psychology, with thesis, will prepare the student who intends later to go on to the Ph.D.

1. Prerequisite

  • PSY 420/L Advanced Statistical Methods and Lab (3/1)

2. Required Courses (20 Units)

Advanced Statistical Methods/Lab (8 units)
  • PSY 520/L Advanced Statistical Methods and Lab (3/1)
  • and PSY 524/L Multivariate Statistical Methods and Lab (3/1)
Advanced Research Methods (3 units)
  • PSY 692A Seminar in Research Methodology (3)
Advanced Psychological Theory (9 units)
Select 6 units from the following:
  • PSY 690A Seminar in Sensation and Perception (3)
  • PSY 690B Seminar in Conditioning and Learning (30
  • PSY 691A Seminar in Cognition (3)
  • PSY 691B Seminar in Emotion and Motivation (3)
  • Select 3 units from the following:
  • PSY 640 Advanced Social Psychology I (3)
  • or PSY 641 Advanced Social Psychology II (3)

3. Electives (8 Units)

Students must take 8 or more academic units at the 500 or 600-level, although they may take up to 6 of those units at the 400-level with permission.

4. Thesis (6 Units)

  • PSY 698C Thesis or Graduate Project (3-3)

Students are required to complete a master’s level thesis or project as part of their degree requirements. Specific academic, formatting, and oral defense requirements are found in the Department of Psychology Graduate Handbook.

Final Oral Examination: This examination is based primarily on the thesis and is scheduled 2 weeks after the final version of the thesis is presented to the graduate committee.

5. Comprehensive Examination (3 Units)

Students will enroll in PSY 697 and will complete a comprehensive examination in their second year of study as their culminating experience. The student’s Professors will write exam questions. For further information, consult the Department of Psychology Graduate Handbook or graduate advisor.

PSY 697 Directed Comprehensive Studies (3)

Area Examination: 3 units, which do not count toward the required 34 units. Each candidate for the M.A. degree must pass an examination in the area of General Experimental Psychology.

Total time allowed for completion of the entire program is 7 years from the time of acceptance. Students who intend to interrupt their program are expected to notify the department in writing to request prior approval. Those who fail to meet these requirements, or who fail to maintain a grade-point average of 3.0 or greater, are subject to being dropped from the program.

  • Total Minimum Units Required for the M.A. Degree,
  • General Experimental Psychology
  • 34

C. Human Factors and Applied Psychology

This program emphasizes the application of advanced psychological theories and methods pertaining to contemporary problems in the design and evaluation of people-technology-environment systems. Objectives are to prepare students to function as effective human factors specialists in industry, government or consultant settings, and to provide a strong foundation for further advanced academic study in human factors and applied psychology. Note: this is not an Industrial/Organizational program. For further information, consult the Department of Psychology Graduate Handbook or graduate advisor.

1. Required Courses (22 Units)

Advanced Statistical Methods/Lab (5 units)
  • PSY 485AA-ZZ/S Advanced Inquiry in Research & Analysis Methods and Seminar (3/2)
Advanced Psychological Theory (9 units)
  • PSY 656A, B, C, or D Seminar in Human Factors Principles and Applications (3-3-3)
Advanced Research Methods (8 units)
  • PSY 678A or B Human Performance Research in Psychology (4)
  • PSY 682 Subsystem Integration in Human Factors Design (4)

2. Electives (8 Units)

Elective courses are selected in consultation with the graduate advisor. Elective courses must be approved by the graduate advisor prior to enrolling in those courses. Elective courses taken without prior approval may not count toward the M.A. degree.

Thesis or Graduate Project (6 Units)
PSY 698C – Thesis or Graduate Project (3-3)
  • a. Final Oral Examination: This examination is primarily based on the student’s thesis or project and is scheduled two weeks after the final version of the thesis or project is presented to the student’s Graduate Thesis Committee.
  • b. Time for Completion: Normally, PSY 698C is taken in two successive semesters and the thesis or project is completed within one calendar year. Exceptions must be petitioned in writing to the Human Factors Option Coordinator and approved by each member of the student’s thesis committee.

Total time allowed for completion of the entire program is seven (7) years from the time of acceptance. Students who intend to interrupt their program (defined as: Failure to enroll in any courses during any semester after they are admitted to the program) are required to notify the Psychology Department and the Human Factors Option Coordinator in writing to request prior approval.

Students who fail to meet these requirements, or who fail to maintain a minimum grade-point-average of 3.0 are subject to dismissal from the program.

  • Total Minimum Units Required for the M.A. Degree, Human Factors and Applied Psychology
  • 36

Course List

PSY 150. Principles of Human Behavior (3)
Designed to give students an understanding and appreciation of the scientific approach to human behavior, thought and action, and to provide the basic conceptual framework for studying the cognitive, emotional, and social aspects of human activity. Students are required to spend approximately 2.5 hours during the term in research-related activities. (Available for General Education, Social Sciences)
PSY 200. Introduction to Lifespan Psychology (3)
Prerequisite: PSY 150. Introduction to the patterns of growth, change, and stability in behavior that occurs through the entire life span. In addition to physical development, this course examines growth and change in intellectual abilities as well as how interactions with others and social relationships develop from infancy to late adulthood. (Available for General Education, Social Sciences)
PSY 230. Introduction to Human Sexual Behavior (3)
Prerequisite: ANTH, PSY or SOC 150. Introductory overview of human sexual function and sexual behavior. Emphasis on the historical and religious background of the prevailing attitudes toward sex in our culture as well as to current sexual practices from the perspective of contemporary social science. Additional topics include sexual values and ethics, love, legal aspects of sexual behavior, and eroticism in American culture. (Cross listed with ANTH 230 and SOC 230)
PSY 245. Psychology of Social Issues (3)
Inquiry into the psychological aspects of contemporary social problems. Analysis of psychosocial variables influencing people and a consideration of the conscious and unconscious aspects of motive states underlying current social conflicts. Individually assigned readings, small group discussions, and classroom participation required. (Available for General Education, Social Sciences)
PSY 250. Physiological Correlates Human Behavior (3)
Prerequisite: PSY 150; passing grade in AAS, CHS, PAS, or ENGL 098 or eligibility for the lower division writing requirement. Designed for students majoring in psychology. Development of a greater understanding of the relationship between human behavior and human physiology. Includes basic information about the anatomy and function of the nervous system and the endocrine system. Students are required to spend approximately 1.25 hours during the term in research-related activities.
PSY 265. Psychology of Prejudice (3)
Prerequisite: PSY 150. Consideration of psychologically relevant research and theory relating to prejudice and discrimination. Special emphasis given to African American, Asian, Jewish, Latino, and Native American cultures. Topics include institutional racism and discrimination, issues of “reverse discrimination,” culture, ethnicity and language, and historical victims of prejudice and discrimination. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)

Upper Division Course Prerequisite.

  • 1. Passing grade in AAS, CHS, PAS, or ENGL 098 or eligibility for the lower division writing requirement
  • 2. Completion of the lower division writing requirement is a prerequisite to all 300-level courses.
  • 3. Passing the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam with a score of 8 or higher is a prerequisite for all 400-level courses.
  • 4. PSY 250, 320/L, and 321/L are required for many upper division courses and are recommended for most others.
  • 5. PSY 301 is prerequisite for all AA-ZZ Advanced Inquiry courses, and is recommended preparation for all upper division courses.
  • 6. When taken for the major, the following courses must be taken as corequisites with their 1 unit lab: PSY 320/L, 321/L. Exceptions must be approved by the instructor prior to enrolling.
  • 7. 500-level psychology courses may be taken for elective credit by undergraduates if the instructor grants permission.
PSY 301. Pre-Professional Development in Psychology (1)
Prerequisite: completion of the lower division writing requirement. Recommended preparation: PSY 150. Pre-Professional Development is a required course for psychology majors. It should be taken as early as possible after declaring psychology as your major. Students will learn about career options for psychology majors, preparation for various post-BA career options and preparation techniques for graduate-level (master’s and higher) education. While the course is designed for psychology majors, students contemplating psychology as a major are encouraged to enroll. This 1-unit course is offered on a Credit/No Credit basis only.
PSY 302. Human Learning in the Formative Years (3)
Prerequisite: PSY 150. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Process of learning during infancy, childhood, and early adolescence. Topics include concepts of cognitive development, individual problems in learning, the social learning process and the role of motivation.
PSY 304. Cognitive Psychology and Instruction (3.
Prerequisite: PSY 150 and completion of the lower division writing requirement. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Introduction to research and theory on how instruction affects student learning. Topics may include development of learning and thinking strategies, instructional methods, learning in subject matter areas, individual differences, and classroom processes. Explores implications for education and teacher training. This course fulfills the 300-level Cognitive Psychology Cluster Requirement for Psychology majors.
PSY 305. Cultural Determinants of Psychological Processes (3)
Prerequisite: PSY 150. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Psychological analysis of human emotions, actions, and cognitions in relation to the surrounding culture from which they emerge. Interactions between conformity to societal norms, and deviation from them, are examined in depth.
PSY 306. Health Psychology (3)
Prerequisite: PSY 250. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Provides an analysis of the contributions of psychology to medicine. Topics include an analysis of patient/ physician interaction, psychological risk factors in illness, behavioral management techniques for disease, psychological intervention in addictive behaviors, and psychological promotion of healthy behavior. Intended for both psychology majors and students who intend to work in health related fields.
PSY 310. Abnormal Psychology (3.
Prerequisite: PSY 150, PSY 250, completion of the lower division writing requirement. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Survey of mental disorders including biological, psychological, and social/cultural determinants as well as psychosocial and pharmacological interventions. This course fulfills the 300-level Clinical/Personality Psychology Cluster Requirement for Psychology majors.
PSY 312. Psychological Aspects of Parenthood (3)
Prerequisites: PSY 150 and completion of the lower division writing requirement. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Analysis of motivations and skills necessary for parenthood and the effect of various parental attitudes and practices on the development of the self. Historical presentation of changes in parenting styles, cross-cultural views of parental practices and current information on the results of deviations in parental care. Examination of alternate family styles: single parenting, communal living arrangements and reconstituted families. (Available for General Education, Social Sciences) (IC)
PSY 313. Developmental Psychology (3.
Prerequisites: PSY 150 and completion of the lower division writing requirement; Recommended preparation: PSY 301. In the context of examining the development of the whole child, relevant aspects of physical, social, cognitive, linguistic, and emotional change are highlighted as part of development from birth to adolescence. Emphasis on the study of the underlying processes and influences on human development. Cultural contexts of development, key changes, continuity, and individual differences are examined. Includes evaluation of selected theories, contemporary issues, and practical applications. This course fulfills the 300-level Developmental Psychology Cluster Requirement for psychology majors.
PSY 317. Psychopharmacology (3)
Prerequisites: PSY 250 and completion of the lower division writing requirement. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Study of the most commonly used therapeutic and recreational drugs. Physiological effects upon the central nervous system and resultant behavior.
PSY 320/L. Statistical Methods in Psychological Research and Lab (3/1)
Prerequisites: PSY 150; MATH 140 or equivalent. Corequisite: PSY 320L. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Analysis of statistical decision-making procedures used in psychological research. Lab: considers problem-solving techniques and computational methods needed to analyze data obtained in psychological experiments. Three hours lecture-discussion; two hours lab per week.
PSY 321/L. Research Methods in Psychology and Lab (3/1.
Prerequisites: PSY 320/L and completion of lower division writing requirement. Corequisite: PSY 321L. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Study of principles and techniques used to design and evaluate psychological research using simple and advanced research designs. Lab: includes use of various research methods in psychology research projects. Three hours lecture-discussion; three hours lab per week.
PSY 322/L. Computer Applications for Psychologists and Lab (3/1)
Prerequisite: PSY 150. Corequisite: PSY 322L. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Introduction to the use of computers by psychologists in their clinical practice, research and teaching. Students use personal computers and student versions of state of the art applications programs. No computer experience necessary. Three hours lecture-discussion; two hours lab per week.
PSY 327. Infancy and Early Childhood (3.
Prerequisite: PSY 150, completion of the lower division writing requirement. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Relevant aspects of physical, social, cognitive, and emotional change are highlighted as part of human development from conception to early childhood (conception to 8 years). Emphasis on study of the underlying processes and influences on human development. Cultural contexts of development, key changes, continuity, and individual differences are examined. Includes evaluation of selected theories, contemporary issues, and practical applications. This course fulfills the 300-level Developmental Psychology Cluster Requirement for psychology majors.
PSY 335. Middle Childhood (3)
Prerequisites: PSY 150, completion of the lower division writing requirement. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. This course examines developmental changes in the middle childhood years (7 – 12 years). Emphasis is on current research and major theories associated with middle childhood development. Cultural contexts of development, key changes, continuity, and individual differences are examined. This course fulfills the 300-level Developmental Psychology Cluster Requirement for Psychology majors.
PSY 344. Psychology of Creativity (4)
Prerequisite: PSY 150. Recommended preparation: PSY 301.Examination of the research on creativity and exploration of the creative process through classroom activities, group projects, and the use of technology. Examines the application of creative processes to effective instruction.
PSY 345. Social Psychology (3.
Prerequisites: PSY 150, and completion of the lower division writing requirement. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Survey of phenomena that affect individual behavior. Topics include attitudes, affiliation, aggression, altruism, person perception, liking, social interaction, social influence, and group dynamics. This course fulfills the 300-level Social Psychology Cluster Requirement for psychology majors.
PSY 350. Principles of Learning (3)
Prerequisites: PSY 150 and completion of the lower division writing requirement. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Basic procedures and phenomena of behavior change emphasizing respondent and operant conditioning with applications to human behavior.
PSY 351. Behavioral Psychology & Therapy (3)
Prerequisites: PSY 150, PSY 250, completion of the lower division writing requirement. Recommended Preparation: PSY 301. The focus of this course is on how we learn certain behaviors, why we behave as we do, and how human behavior can be modified. Topics include basic concepts, research methods used to study adaptive and maladaptive behaviors, assessment procedures, intervention strategies and outcomes, self-management, and ethical considerations in practice. This course fulfills the 300-level Clinical/Personality Psychology Cluster Requirement for psychology majors. *This course serves in a series of courses that prepares students to apply for the Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analyst (BCaBA) Exam.
PSY 352. Motivation (3)
Prerequisites: PSY 150 and completion of the lower division writing requirement. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Explores basic and acquired motivations that provide the energy to arouse and direct the individual’s interactions with society. Discusses research methods in the social sciences. (Available for General Education, Social Sciences) (IC)
PSY 353. Psychological Interventions (3)
Prerequisites: PSY 150, PSY 250, completion of the lower division writing requirement. Recommended preparation: PSY 301, PSY 310. This course focuses on the theories and practice of psychological interventions. Topics include scientific bases for psychological interventions and case formulation, cultural and ethnic sensitivity, treatment of special populations, as well as ethical and legal issues. The course emphasizes current research findings and their implementation in treatment strategies. This course fulfills the 300-level Clinical/Personality Cluster requirement for psychology majors.
PSY 356. Industrial and Organizational Psychology (3)
Prerequisites: PSY 150. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. An introduction to the major applications of psychology in various organizational and job settings. Representative topics include job selection and training, job enrichment, motivation, team collaboration, leadership, knowledge sharing, environmental design, consumer psychology, psychometrics, social networking and human factors. Consideration is given to individual student work interests and to the application psychological principles to help advance student career objectives.
PSY 361. Adolescence (3)
Prerequisites: PSY 150 and completion of the lower division writing requirement. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Analysis of the physical, cognitive, social and emotional changes from puberty to adulthood. Examines contemporary youth culture from a historical and cross-cultural perspective. Discusses evaluation of age norms and deviant development. Project involving some aspect of adolescent development is required. This course fulfills the 300-level Developmental Psychology Cluster Requirement for Psychology majors. (Cross-listed with CADV 361)
PSY 365. Introduction to Gerontology (3)
Prerequisites: PSY 150 and completion of the lower division writing requirement.Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Analysis of the physical, cognitive, social and emotional changes from puberty to adulthood. Study of the changes occurring with age as a result of alterations in physical conditions, economic status, role changes, etc. and the accompanying psychological effects. Students may engage in volunteer activities or advocacy work in community agencies for persons over 55, or in research in memory, quality of life issues, physical health, exercise, etc. This course fulfills the 300-level Developmental Psychology Cluster Requirement for Psychology majors. (Available for General Education, Social Sciences)(IC)
PSY 367. Cognitive Psychology (3)
Prerequisites: PSY 150, completion of the lower division writing requirement. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Analysis of the mechanisms by which people gather and process information from the environment. Basic phenomena of perception and cognition are discussed with an emphasis on experimental studies on such topics as pattern recognition, attention, memory, language, reasoning, and problem solving. This course fulfills the 300-level Cognitive Psychology Cluster Requirement for psychology majors.
PSY 369. Applied Cognition (3)
Prerequisites: PSY 150, completion of the lower division writing requirement. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Cognitive psychology is the study of mental processes, such as learning, memory, attention, problem solving, and language. Applied cognitive psychology describes contemporary cognitive theory from the perspective of its application in support of human performance in real-world domains, such as medicine, legal practice, aviation, and business, among many others. This course fulfills the 300-level Cognitive Psychology Cluster Requirement for psychology majors.
PSY 370. Psychology of Personality (3.
Prerequisites: PSY 150, PSY 250; and completion of lower division writing requirement. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Human behavior and personality as a function of social, dynamic, and biological determinants. Emphasis on social learning conditions which relate to normal and deviant behavior and other relevant contemporary issues. This course fulfills the 300-level Clinical/Personality Psychology Cluster Requirement for psychology majors.
PSY 380. Psychology of Stress (3.
Prerequisites: PSY 150, PSY 250; and completion of lower division writing requirement. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Cognitive, emotional and physiological effects of psychosocial stressors. Emphasis placed on differentiating stress from other motivational constructs and examining contemporary research approaches and techniques of personal stress management. This course fulfills the 300-level Clinical/Personality Psychology Cluster Requirement for psychology majors.
PSY 382. Principles of Human Factors (3.
Prerequisites: PSY 150, and completion of the lower division writin.requirement.Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Overview of the interdisciplinary field of human factors, a professional specialization that considers how best to accommodate human needs in real world systems. Focuses on cognitive, perceptual, behavioral, and physiological principles as they relate to the design of devices, products and systems in order to enhance human performance and satisfaction. Representative topics include principles of information processing, human characteristics and limitations, environmental stressors, user safety and applied research techniques. This course fulfills the 300-level Cognitive Psychology Cluster Requirement for Psychology majors.
PSY 383. Interpersonal Competence and Group Dynamics (3)
Prerequisite: PSY 150. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Lecture-discussion and experiential activities designed to increase knowledge and skill in the areas of interpersonal relations, group dynamics and leadership.
PSY 384. Dynamics of Leadership (3)
Prerequisite: PSY 383. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Examination of basic leadership theory and techniques, dynamics between leaders and group members, communication within the group and within the leadership hierarchy, and organizational management. Includes a practical application of leadership skills through participation in individual and group problem-solving projects.
PSY 386. The Role of Psychology in the Legal Process (3)
Prerequisite: PSY 150. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Critical examination of the relationship between psychology and the legal system. Covers the application of social psychological theory and research to the courtroom, issues in mental health law such as competency to stand trial and the insanity defense, and legal restrictions on the practice of psychology including confidentiality and the duty to warn.
PSY 390A. Peer-Assisted Instruction in Psychology (2)
Prerequisites: PSY 150; consent of instructor and department chair. Not open to students who have received credit for 390B. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Preparation and supervised experience as an instructional aide in a selected lower division psychology course. May not be repeated. (Credit may be applied to the major or minor) (Credit/No Credit Only.
PSY 390B. Peer-Assisted Instruction in Psychology (2)
Prerequisites: PSY 150; appropriate upper division psychology courses; consent of instructor and department chair. Not open to students who have received credit for 390A. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Preparation and supervised experience as an instructional aide in a selected upper division psychology course. May not be repeated. (Credit may be applied to the major or minor) (Credit/No Credit Only)
PSY 406. Developmental Psychopathology (3.
Prerequisites: PSY 313 and completion of the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam with a score of 8 or higher; Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Study of the cognitive, physical, and psychosocial effects of disorders diagnosed in infancy, childhood, or adolescence (e.g., autism, mental retardation, communication disorders). Study of empirically validated interventions appropriate for each population. Available for graduate credit with consent of student’s graduate advisor. *This course serves in a series of courses that prepares students to apply for the Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analyst (BCaBA) Exam.
PSY 409. Advanced Sport Psychology (3)
Cross-listed as KIN 409. Prerequisite: score of 8 or better on Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam. Recommended preparation: KIN 306 and/or PSY 150; PS.301.Not available to students who have taken KIN 409. Addresses the evolution of sport psychology as a science, including the psychological variables associated with successful performance in sport and physical activity settings. Available for graduate credit with consent of student’s graduate advisor. KIN majors receive upper-division elective credit toward KIN degree in options that allow electives.
PSY 412. Advanced Developmental Psychology (3)
Prerequisites: PSY 313; PSY 320/L; 321/L; and completion of the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam with a score of 8 or higher. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Critical evaluation of the experimental and theoretical literature in developmental psychology. Selected contemporary and applied issues relevant to children and adolescents are discussed.
PSY 413. Current Trends in Child Psychology (3)
Prerequisite: PSY 150 and completion of the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam with a score of 8 or higher. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. No credit if PSY 313 has been taken. Survey of the major contemporary issues, findings, and theories in child psychology, with a consideration of their broader applications. Project involving some aspect of child development is required.
PSY 418. Theories of Perception (3)
Prerequisites: Completion of the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam with a score of 8 or higher. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Critical analysis of theories in sensation and perception, with a consideration of their broader implications.
PSY 420/L. Advanced Statistical Methods and Lab (3/1)
Prerequisites: PSY 320/L and completion of the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam with a score of 8 or higher. Corequisite: PSY 420L. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Explores the relationships between advanced statistical methods and psychological research methods. Advanced techniques of analysis of variance and regression analysis are emphasized. Lab: considers problem-solving techniques and advanced computational methods needed to analyze data obtained in complex psychological experiments. Consideration given to an individual’s particular research interest. Three hours lecture-discussion; two hours lab per week.
PSY 421A-Z. Workshop in Psychology (1-1-1-1)
Prerequisites: PSY 150 and completion of the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam with a score of 8 or higher. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Psychology workshops deal with specific psychological topics related to living and adjusting in contemporary society. Encourages relevance and practical application through the use of group discussions, simulations, role-playing, case studies, and real-life examples. Maximum of 4 units may be counted toward the major.
PSY 425. Origins and Perspectives in Psychology (4.
Prerequisites: PSY 150 and Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam with a score of 8 or higher. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Considers the present state of the science of psychology within the context of its origins and the key individuals that have influenced the field. Emphasizes discussions of important issues in contemporary psychology and its future. Students complete an approved, supervised comprehensive term-project in response to specific course topics. Course is available for graduate credit with consent of student’s graduate advisor. Weekly: three hours lecture/discussion, one hour TBA.
PSY 426. Contemporary Trends in Psychology (3)
Prerequisite: PSY 150; completion of the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam with a score of 8 or higher. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Trends and issues in current psychological theories and systems.
PSY 427. Introduction to Psychological Testing (3)
Prerequisites: PSY 320/L; completion of the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam with a score of 8 or higher. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Basic concepts of psychological measurement as applied to the construction, evaluation and use of group and individual tests of intelligence, aptitude, interest and personality are studied. Demonstrations of the administration, scoring and interpretations of standardized tests are provided.
PSY 430. Theories of Personality (3)
Prerequisites: PSY 370; completion of the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam with a score of 8 or higher. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Basic principles of science as applied to the study of personality. Current theories of personality are analyzed in terms of structure, dynamics, and development. Characteristic research and research methods are covered.
PSY 432. Applied Intergroup Relations and Mediation (4)
Prerequisite: Completion of the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam with a score of 8 or higher. Recommended preparation: PSY 301; PSY 345. Seminar examining theories of intergroup relations, inclusion, diversity and equity, and their application in field settings, as well as principles of intergroup conflict mediation and their use. Students apply the theories and principles in supervised fieldwork and complete an approved community based project report, as either a service intern or a research intern.
PSY 436. Memory (3)
Prerequisites: PSY 321/L; completion of the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam with a score of 8 or higher. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Introduces classical views as well as current theories of human memory. Different memory systems are examined. Topics include forgetting and retrieval of memory, repression of memory, eyewitness testimony, amnesia, and memory and aging. Covers cognitive processes involved in remembering.
PSY 440. Thinking (3)
Prerequisites: PSY 321/L and completion of the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam with a score of 8 or higher. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Survey of cognitive and symbolic processes, including concept formation, judgment, problem solving, creative activity, and states of consciousness.
PSY 442. Communication and Conflict Resolution (3)
Prerequisite: PSY 150; completion of the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam with a score of 8 or higher. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Sharing of information and meanings in both verbal and nonverbal communication. Strategies of communication for active listening and sending of affective messages in many different contexts: couples, parent-child, group, work place. Examines differences in communication style as a function of gender, age, social class, position of dominance, etc.
PSY 445. Applications of Social Psychology (3)
Prerequisites: completion of the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam with a score of 8 or higher. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Seminar on social psychological methods, theories, and research findings as they apply to understanding and solving behavioral problems and social issues. Topics include physical and mental health, environmental behaviors, prejudice and discrimination, sports, consumerism, education, law, media, organizations, politics, diversity, and culture. Completion of projects requiring application of social psychology to a theoretical controversy or practical problem.
PSY 446. Issues in Social Psychology (3)
Prerequisites: PSY 345; completion of the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam with a score of 8 or higher. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Critical analysis of basic and applied social psychological theories and issues and their application in contemporary society.
PSY 452. Contemporary Issues in Human Sexuality (3)
Prerequisites: PSY 230; completion of the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam with a score of 8 or higher. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Study of controversial topics in sexual behavior from a socio-psychological standpoint. Varying perspectives of heterosexuality, homosexuality, transexualism, polygamous marriage, non-marital sex, and related topics are presented. Both traditional and unconventional viewpoints toward these variant behaviors are examined.
PSY 453. Psychological Aspects of Human Sexuality (3)
Prerequisites: PSY 230; completion of the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam with a score of 8 or higher. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Examines sexual behaviors and attitudes in contemporary society and includes the physiological basis of sexual function and dysfunction. A comprehensive and integrated approach to human sexuality.
PSY 454. Clinical Psychology (4)
Prerequisites: PSY 310; completion of the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam with a score of 8 or higher. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Survey of varied approaches to psychotherapy and examination of assessment methods used in research and decision making in clinical settings. Historical development of the field of clinical psychology and related disciplines and current professional issues such as graduate programs, ethics and delivery of mental health services to the community are explored. Students are expected to complete 20 hours of field work in an agency related to their career objective.
PSY 455. Ethical, Professional and Legal Standards in Psychology (3)
Prerequisites: PSY 150; Upper Division or graduate-status in psychology; completion of the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam with a score of 8 or higher. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Ethical issues relevant to teaching, research, and application of psychology are reviewed with an emphasis on the principles of the American Psychological Association’s ethics code and related professional standards and guidelines.
PSY 460. Counseling and Interviewing (3)
Prerequisites: PSY 310; completion of the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam with a score of 8 or higher. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Intensive study of current approaches to individual counseling and psychotherapy, particularly for students seeking preparation for graduate programs. Format allows students to present research findings, discuss current theories, and to experience therapy situations through role play and supervised counseling.
PSY 462. The Development of Language and Thought in the Young Child (3)
Prerequisite: PSY 150; completion of the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam with a score of 8 or higher. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Analysis of the processes of language and cognitive development and their interactions in young children. Considers problems, issues and implications of these processes for use with children. Evaluation of current theories. Project required.
PSY 464. Cognitive and Behavioral Intervention Techniques (3)
Prerequisites: Completion of the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam with a score of 8 or higher. Recommended Preparation: PSY 301; PSY 350. Consideration of some of the major issues and theories of human behavior change including a critical review of some of the important relevant experiments and areas of application. Includes techniques of modifying cognitive processes and behavior in the medical and clinical settings.
PSY 465. Psychology of Aging (3)
Prerequisites: PSY 365; completion of the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam with a score of 8 or higher. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Comprehensive study of the later years of life including physical changes, social adaptations, psychological aspects and the interactions among these areas. Successful aging is explored as well as problem areas. Attention given to intervention strategies and to theoretical formulations. Students are expected to participate in ongoing relationships with the elderly.
PSY 470. Introduction to Psychobiology (3)
Prerequisites: Completion of the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam with a score of 8 or higher. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Consideration of the physiological, biochemical, anatomical and endocrinological aspects of behavior. Discusses traditional theories and current topics in psychobiology.
PSY 471AA-ZZ/S. Advanced Inquiry in Clinical/Personality Psychology and Seminar(3/2)
Prerequisites: PSY 301, PSY 320/L, PSY 321/L, any course from required Clinical Cluster (PSY 310 or PSY 351 or PSY 353 or PSY 370 or PSY 380), and a score of 8 or better on the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam. Corequisite: Corresponding PSY 471AA-ZZ Seminar. This capstone course provides advanced study of areas of current interest in sub-areas of clinical/personality psychology. Topics within sub-areas listed below may change each semester. Seminar: Includes student presentation of written and oral reports based on relevant topics from current literature, and intensive student-led discussions of selected research and application of theories. Students will demonstrate knowledge of statistics and research methods obtained in prerequisite courses. Letters indicate sub-areas within clinical/personality psychology; each may be taken one time for credit: AB-Applied Behavior Analysis, C-Clinical, CN-Clinical Neuropsychology, and P-Personality. Satisfies the capstone requirement for psychology majors. Available for graduate credit with consent of student’s graduate advisor. Three hours lecture, two hours seminar.
PSY 473AA-ZZ/S. Advanced Inquiry in Neuroscience and Seminar (3/2)
Prerequisites: PSY 301, PSY 320/L, and PSY 321/L, and a score of 8 or better on the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam. Corequisite: Corresponding PSY 473AA-ZZ Seminar. This capstone course provides advanced study of areas of current interest in sub-areas of neuroscience. Topics within sub-areas listed below may change each semester. Seminar: Includes student presentation of written and oral reports based on relevant topics from current literature, and intensive student-led discussions of selected research and application of theories. Students will demonstrate knowledge of statistics and research methods obtained in prerequisite courses. Letters indicate sub-areas within neuroscience; each may be taken one time for credit: (BN) Behavioral Neuroscience, (CN) Cognitive Neuroscience, (NP) Neuropsychology, (P) Psychopharmacology. Satisfies the capstone requirement for psychology majors. Available for graduate credit with consent of student’s graduate advisor. Three hours lecture, two hours seminar.
PSY 475AA-ZZ/S. Advanced Inquiry in Developmental Psychology and Seminar (3/2)
Prerequisites: PSY 301, PSY 320/L, PSY 321/L, any course from required Developmental Cluster (PSY 313 or PSY 327 or PSY 335 or PSY 361 or PSY 365), and a score of 8 or better on the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam. Corequisite: Corresponding PSY 475AA-ZZ Seminar. This capstone course provides advanced study of topics of current interest in sub-areas of developmental psychology. Topics within sub-areas listed below may change each semester. Seminar: Includes student presentation of written and oral reports based on relevant topics from current literature, and intensive student-led discussions of selected research and application of theories. Students will demonstrate knowledge of statistics and research methods obtained in prerequisite courses. Letters indicate sub-areas within developmental psychology; each may be taken one time for credit: (CD) Cognitive Development, (CO)Contexts of Development, (CU) Cultural Contexts of Development, (DM) Developmental Research Methods, (ID) Identity Development, (LD) Language Development, SE-Social & Emotional Development. Satisfies the capstone requirement for psychology majors. Available for graduate credit with consent of student’s graduate advisor. Three hours lecture, two hours seminar.
PSY 479AA-ZZ/S. Advanced Inquiry in Social Psychology and Seminar (3/2)
Prerequisites: PSY 301, PSY 320/L, PSY 321/L, PSY 345 and a score of 8 or better on the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam. Corequisite: Corresponding PSY 479AA-ZZ Seminar. This capstone course provides advanced study of topics of current interest in sub-areas of social psychology. Topics within sub-areas listed below may change each semester. Seminar: Includes student presentation of written and oral reports based on relevant topics from current literature, and intensive student-led discussions of selected research and application of theories. Students will demonstrate knowledge of statistics and research methods obtained in prerequisite courses. Letters indicate sub-areas within social psychology; each may be taken one time for credit: (A) Attitudes; (AG) Aggression; (AH) Altruism & Helping; (AI) Attraction & Intimacy; (AS) Applied Social Psychology; (AT) Attribution; (C) Culture; (CO) Conformity & Obedience; (G) Gender; (GS) General Social Psychology; (IR) Intergroup Relations; (P) Persuasion; (PD) Prejudice and Discrimination; (S) Self; (SC) Social Cognition. Satisfies capstone requirement for psychology majors. Available for graduate credit with consent of student’s graduate advisor. Three hours lecture, two hours seminar.
PSY 482. Human Factors in Systems Design (3)
Prerequisite: completion of the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam with a score of 8 or higher. Recommended Preparation: PSY 150; PSY 301. Study of applications that illustrate human factors principles and practices in the design of industrial systems, residential environments, and community facilities. Emphasizes designing for human performance and behavior.
PSY 483. Principles of Human Relations (3)
Prerequisite: PSY 150; completion of the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam with a score of 8 or higher. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Examination of interpersonal communication and group interaction by using the classroom group as a microcosm. Emphasis on increasing interpersonal competence and on understanding the principles underlying such behavior.
PSY 483T. Tutorial in Human Relations (1)
Prerequisites: PSY 483; completion of the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam with a score of 8 or higher. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Supervised projects and field study in the area of human relations.
PSY 485AA-ZZ/S. Advanced Inquiry in Research & Analysis Methods and Seminar (3/2)
Prerequisites: PSY 301, PSY 320/L, PSY 321/L, and a score of 8 or better on the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam. Corequisite: Corresponding PSY 485AA-ZZ seminar. This capstone course provides advanced study of areas of current interest in sub-areas of research methods in psychology. Topics within sub-areas listed below may change each semester. Seminar: Includes student presentation of written and oral reports based on relevant topics from current literature, and intensive student-led discussions of selected research and application of theories. Students will demonstrate knowledge of statistics and research methods obtained in prerequisite courses. Letters indicate sub-areas within psychology; each may be taken one time for credit: (AD) Archival Data, (CS) Case Study, (DA) Discourse Analysis, (ET) Ethnography, (GT) Grounded Theory, (NA) Narrative Analysis, (PA) Participatory Action Research, (QL) Qualitative Methods; (QT) Quantitative Methods; (SD) Survey Data. Satisfies the capstone requirement for psychology majors. Available for graduate credit with consent of student’s graduate advisor. Three hours lecture, two hours seminar.
PSY 486SOC. Social Science Career Internship (3)
Prerequisites: PSY 150; completion of the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam with a score of 8 or higher. Corequisite: Enrollment in 1-unit of SBS486: Social Science Career Seminar (Contact College of Social and Behavioral Sciences’ office). Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Social and behavioral science principles are applied to the work place. At least nine hours per week of supervised fieldwork are required. Students complete learning contracts and submit written reports related to their internship. (Crosslisted with GEOG, PAS, POLS, and SOC 486SOC) (See section on Academic Internships)
PSY 487. Psychology of Human Technology Interaction (3.
Prerequisites: PSY 150 and Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam with a score of 8 or higher. Recommended Preparation: PSY 301. Seminar focusing on the psychological and behavioral issues in human-technology systems. Principles of cognitive science, human factors and social psychology are applied to the study of human-technology communication processes. Research topics include voice input/speech output, interactive/touch graphic displays, web navigation, knowledge-based problem solving, mobile computing and technology-mediated social networks. User experience evaluations and program improvements are considered. No programming knowledge is required. Available for graduate credit with consent of student’s graduate advisor.
PSY 488AA-ZZ/S. Advanced Inquiry in Cognitive Psychology and Seminar (3/2)
Prerequisites: PSY 301, PSY 320/L, PSY 321/L, any course from required Cognitive Cluster (PSY 304 or PSY 367 or PSY 369 or PSY 382), and a score of 8 or better on the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam. Co-requisite: Corresponding PSY 488AA-ZZ Seminar. This capstone course provides advanced study of topics of current interest in sub-areas of cognitive psychology. Topics within sub-areas listed below may change each semester. Seminar: Includes student presentation of written and oral reports based on relevant topics from current literature, and intensive student-led discussions of selected research and application of theories. Students will demonstrate knowledge of statistics and research methods obtained in prerequisite courses. Letters indicate sub-areas within cognitive psychology; each may be taken one time for credit: (AC) Attention & Consciousness, (C) Cognition, (CA) Cognition & Action, (CI) Creativity & Innovation, (DM) Decision Making, (E) Expertise, (HF) Human Factors, (I) Intelligence, (L) Language, (M) Memory, (MI) Mental Imagery, (OP)Origins & Perspectives, (P) Perception, (PM) Pattern Matching, (PS) Problem Solving, (R) Reasoning. Satisfies the capstone requirement for psychology majors. Available for graduate credit with consent of student’s graduate advisor. Three hours lecture, two hours seminar.
PSY 490/L. Quantitative Research Methods and Lab (3/1)
Prerequisites: PSY 250; 320/L; 321/L; and completion of the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam with a score of 8 or higher. Corequisite: PSY 490L. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Focuses on quantitative methodologies, statistical analysis of data, the nature of knowledge, and writing professional papers in various fields related to mental health. Students read primary resources, conduct an empirical study, write a professional paper, and present their work in a common forum. Students also learn to enter, “clean” and transform data when necessary, to determine and apply appropriate statistical tests, and to perform advanced descriptive and inferential statistics on small and large data sets. Three hours lecture-discussion; three hours lab per week.
PSY 491/L. Qualitative Research Methods and Lab (3/1)
Prerequisites: Completion of the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam with a score of 8 or higher. Corequisite: PSY 491L. Recommended Preparation: PSY 250; PSY 301; 320/L; 321/L; 490/L. Students learn how to design and conduct mental health research that is qualitative in nature, based on interviews, videotapes, real-time observations, and other non-quantitative sources of data. Topics may include integrating qualitative data with theory, deciding on a coding scheme, coding of data, interpretation of coded data, writing up qualitative reports for theses, dissertations, publications, and presenting qualitative data at conferences. Three hours lecture-discussion; three hours lab per week.
PSY 492SOC. Professional Development the Social Sciences I (1)
Prerequisites: PSY 250; completion of the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam with a score of 8 or higher. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Addresses issues associated with becoming a professional in the social sciences. Discussion of time management, study skills, the role of a researcher, decisions about one’s area of interest in research, deciding on a university, presenting at professional conferences, writing a statement of purpose, Curriculum Vita, studying for the GRE, asking for letters of recommendation, among other topics. (Credit/No Credit Only.
PSY 493SOC. Professional Development in the Social Sciences II (1)
Prerequisites: PSY 250; PSY 492SOC; completion of the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam with a score of 8 or higher. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Students learn, in detail, what it is like to be in a graduate program. Prepares students to be successful while in their graduate program by preparing them to write applications for Institutional Review Board (IRB) approvals for work with human and animal subjects, writing for publication, applying for financial aid, scholarships, fellowships, and other sources of funding. (Credit/No Credit Only)
PSY 495A-Z. Tutorial in Psychology (1-4)
Prerequisite: PSY 150; completion of the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam with a score of 8 or higher. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Supervised individual projects in selected areas of interest. Six units maximum may be taken for credit. May be offered to qualified students as a substitute for a required lab or seminar. Sections meeting in small groups for reading and discussion will be offered in the following fields as schedule and staff allow: (A) Teaching; (B) Human Ecology; (C) Counseling and Interviewing; (D) Social Psychology; (E) Human Factors; (F) Animal Behavior; (G) Teacher Training; (H) Applied Cognitive Psychology; (I) Electrophysiology; (J) Neuropsychology; (K) Student Leadership; (M) Linear Models; (S) Stress; (T) Tutoring; (Z) Zoo research.
PSY 496A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in Psychology (1-4)
Prerequisite: PSY 150 and Completion of the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam with a score of 8 or higher. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Experimental courses in psychology with course content to be determined.
PSY 497. Proseminar in Psychological Research (1-3)
Prerequisite: PSY 150; completion of the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam with a score of 8 or higher. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Introduction to psychological research and writing through supervised individual projects and field work. Six units maximum may be taken for credit.
PSY 498. Practicum in Psychology (1-3)
Prerequisite: Completion of the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam with a score of 8 or higher. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Supervised field work participation in approved community agencies. Written reports and regular conferences with instructor are required. Participation limited to 3 units in each of two semesters. Three units maximum may be applied to the M.A.
PSY 499. Independent Study (1-3)
Prerequisite: PSY 150; completion of the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam with a score of 8 or higher. Recommended preparation: PSY 301. Six units maximum may be taken for credit.

Graduate

Note that 300-level courses in psychology do not carry credit for a master’s degree in psychology. Some 400-level courses in psychology may carry credit for a master’s up to the limits defined by each graduate program. Students should see their graduate advisor for details.
PSY 513. Human Development: A Life Span (3)
Life span approach to the individual from infancy to old age with consideration of biological, psychological and social development. Case studies and other empirical observations focus on the emerging self and the factors that may challenge the development of a well integrated and flexible sense of self.
PSY 514. Advanced Experimental Psychology (3)
Prerequisites: PSY 321/L; 420/L. Critical review of current problems in the field of experimental psychology with emphasis on methods, data, and concepts specific to the experimental approach. Lab experience with techniques and equipment used in experimental studies of behavior. Two hours seminar, two hours lab per week.
PSY 520/L. Multivariate Statistical Methods and Lab (3/1)
Prerequisite: PSY 420/L. Corequisite: PSY 520L. Study of multiple-response, multi-factor regression analysis, multivariate analysis of variance, alternative models in factor analysis, and statistical classification methods. Background matrix algebra and computational techniques required in applications. Lab considers problem-solving techniques and advanced computational methods used to analyze multivariate data obtained in psychological experiments. Three hours seminar; two hours lab per week.
PSY 524/L. Multivariate Analysis Computer and Lab (3/1)
Prerequisites: PSY 420/L. Corequisite: PSY 524L. Analysis of multivariate research data in psychology using packaged computer programs. Covers standard techniques with applications in psychology. Choice of analytic technique is discussed, as are methods of screening data to assure appropriateness of techniques. Lab: provides direct experience with computing facilities for conducting multivariate analysis and computational methods extending statistical analysis provided by computer output. Three hours lecture-discussion, two hours lab per week.
PSY 530. Seminar: Theories of Personality (3)
Recommended Preparation: PSY 430. Advanced consideration of the theories of personality with special emphasis on trends and recent research findings.
PSY 551-A. Becoming a BCBA: Professional and Certification Issues (1)
This course will introduce students to The Behavior Analyst Certification Board which has developed Eligibility Standards to take the BACB Certification Examinations, Renewal and Recertification Standards to maintain certification, Guidelines for Responsible Conduct for Behavior Analysts, Professional Disciplinary Standards with appeal procedures, procedures to approve continuing education providers, and professionally developed and maintained certification examinations.
PSY 551-B. Becoming a BCBA: Taking the Exam (1)
This preparatory course will help the students to review the broad specified content areas and prepare for the Board Certified Behavior Analyst Exam by taking repeated practice tests and obtaining feedback on their progress.
PSY 552. Principles of Applied Behavior Analysis (3)
This course is an introduction to basic characteristics, processes, concepts and terminology in applied behavior analysis (ABA) and the learning principles on which ABA is based. Topics include philosophy and assumptions of ABA, choosing and defining target behaviors, positive and negative reinforcement, schedules of reinforcement, extinction, positive and negative punishment, imitation, motivating operations, functional relations, stimulus control, discrimination and generalization, and verbal behavior. Students also learn to interpret and discuss articles from the behavior analytic literature as well as use self-management techniques.
PSY 553. Measurement & Experimental Evaluation of Behavior (3)
In this course, students will learn how to design and evaluate experimental interventions as well as measure, display and interpret results of experimental behavioral interventions. Ethical considerations in the use of behavioral interventions will also be discussed. *This course serves in a series of courses that prepares students to apply for the Board Certified Behavior Analyst Exam.
PSY 555. Applications and Ethics in Applied Behavior Analysis (3)
This course will focus on ethical issues and the primary methods used for behavioral assessment in application of behavior analysis. Students will learn how to conduct descriptive assessment, task analysis, and functional analysis. Various methods used to collect, graph and interpret behavioral data will be discussed. Selection of intervention outcomes based on total ecobehavioral assessment will be emphasized. Students will learn to make recommendations to client detailing all contingencies of targeted behavior change. *This course serves in a series of courses that prepares students to apply for the Board Certified Behavior Analyst Exam.
PSY 557. Behavior Change Procedures & Systems Support (3)
This course will focus on procedures for behavioral analysts working with students with learning, behavioral, emotional, and/or peer relationship problems. Topics include using reinforcement, punishment, extinction, prompting, shaping, chaining, incidental teaching techniques, direct and precision teaching, discrete trials, contingency contracts, token economy, and providing behavior analysis services in collaboration with others. Students also learn to synthesize and analyze research on effective behavioral change and management practices and to apply the knowledge to classroom and school situations. *This course serves in a series of courses that prepares students to apply for the Board Certified Behavior Analyst Exam.
PSY 558. Topics in Behavior Analysis (3)
In this course, students will learn applications of behavior analytic theories, procedures, and methods as it pertains to special populations (e.g., Children with Autism, Geriatrics, Learners with Developmental Disabilities.) Specific behavioral challenges and research in the selected topics will be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on evidence-based practices and procedures to eliminate or minimize challenges, teach, and increase appropriate behaviors. Given the focus on application, students will be required to conduct and complete a comprehensive written project utilizing behavior analytic principles. *This course serves in a series of courses that prepares students to apply for the Board Certified Behavior Analyst Exam.
PSY 581. Teaching of Psychology (3-3)
Restricted. Instructor permission required. This course focuses on the theories, skills, preparation and practices required for serving as an instructional aide in psychology courses. Topics include course preparation, skills for fostering student learning, theories of assessment, effective strategies for improving student writing, using technology in the classroom, diversity sensitivity, treatment of special populations, as well as ethical and legal issues faced in the classroom. An emphasis will be made on both traditional and recent educational research findings and their implementation for effective teaching. Students attend scheduled seminars on course topics, and serve outside the course as a teaching aide to a professor in the Department of Psychology. Available for graduate credit with consent of student’s graduate advisor. Credit/No Credit only. One hour seminar, two hours by arrangement each week. May be taken for a maximum of 6 units.
PSY 592B. Seminar in Research Methodology (3)
Prerequisite: 15 units of classified graduate work and instructor consent. Students develop and carry out research projects in their elective areas and present their ideas, resources, and proposed methods of research to the class for critical discussion. Research report written to conform to journal format is required.
PSY 594A-Z. Tutorial in Psychology (1-4)
Prerequisite: Admission into the graduate program or instructor consent. Tutorial content varies by instructor and related areas of faculty specialty. Sections meet in small groups for reading and discussion to cover topics such as Cognition, Social Psychology, Traumatic Stress, Mental Disorders and Substance Dependence, Clinical Neuropsychology, and Human Factors Design. May be repeated for credit.
PSY 595A-Z. Experimental Topics Psychology (1-4)
Prerequisite: Admission into the graduate program or instructor consent. Advanced examination of selected studies in psychology with course content to be determined. Topics are presented from a psychological perspective encompassing theory, contemporary research, and intervention alternatives. Course content varies by instructor and related areas of faculty specialty. Courses include such topics as Cognition, Social Psychology, Traumatic Stress, Mental Disorders and Substance Dependence, Pediatric Psychology, Clinical Neuropsychology, and Human Factors Design.
PSY 601. Psychological Service Systems (3)
Prerequisites: instructor consent. Study of the legal, ethical, and professional bases for psychological services. Professional roles in various settings are considered with emphasis on school psychological services. Explores design, development, and evaluation of alternative human service delivery systems.
PSY 602A. Mental Health Models (3)
Prerequisites: Classified graduate status and instructor consent. Historical, theoretical, and evaluative understanding of community and clinical models. Includes study of mental health legislation, funding, cost effectiveness and current issues in the delivery of mental health services. Analysis of types of Community Mental Health Programs.
PSY 605. Introduction to Health Psychology (3)
Prerequisites: Acceptance into the graduate program in clinical psychology or instructor consent. Health psychology is a specialization in clinical psychology devoted to the understanding of the relationships between psychological factors and health and illness. Covers the empirical foundations of several domains of health psychology (e.g., health behaviors and patient compliance, adjustment to chronic and terminal illnesses, substance addiction) and the therapeutic strategies employed for each (e.g., health behavior scheduling, pain management, cognitive-behavioral approaches toward sustained sobriety).
PSY 606. Seminar in Exceptionality (4)
Prerequisite: instructor consent. Study of children who are exceptional intellectually, physically, emotionally. Students are required to participate in ongoing programs with exceptional children.
PSY 610A, B. Advanced Psychopathology (3, 3)
Prerequisites: PSY 310. State of the science review of the principal methods for assessing psychopathology in children and adults. Discussion of the empirical and theoretical basis of the current DSM. PSY 610A covers child and adolescent psychopathology while PSY 610B covers adolescent, adult, and geriatric populations. Both courses include key issues in retrospective assessment, family history and cultural influences. For each symptom classification, presents current theoretical and empirical treatment approaches, including the psycho-pharmacological approach.
PSY 612. Contemporary Problems Child Psychology (3)
Prerequisite: PSY 313 or equivalent and classified graduate status. Examination of current approaches to critical issues and theories relevant to an understanding of developmental processes. Discusses applications of results of these current approaches for psychological service to children.
PSY 622A/L. Research and Statistical Concepts in Psychological Services (3-3)and Lab (1-1)
Prerequisites: PSY 320/L; 321/L; admission to the Psychology Clinical Graduate Program. Corequisite: PSY 622AL. Conceptual integration of research and statistical methods appropriate for psychological service applications. Lab: provides direct experience with computing facilities in conducting multivariate analysis appropriate for psychological services applications. Three hours seminar; two hours lab per week.
PSY 622B/L. Research and Statistical Concepts in Psychological Services (3-3)and Lab (1-1)
Prerequisites: PSY 320/L; 321/L; admission to graduate program in School Psychology or Clinical Psychology. Corequisite: 622BL. Conceptual integration of research and statistical methods appropriate for psychological service applications. Lab: provides direct experience with computing facilities in conducting multivariate analysis appropriate for psychological services applications. Three hours seminar and two hours lab per week.
PSY 625A/L. Psychological Testing I and Lab (Individual)(3/1)
Prerequisites: PSY 427; admission to a Master’s level Graduate Program in Psychology (Clinical, General Experimental or Human Factors). Corequisite: PSY 625AL. Theory and practice of individual assessment of children and adolescents, focusing on assessment of cognitive abilities and achievement. Supervised practice in test administration, interpretation, integration of data from multiple sources, and communication of results. Three hours lecture; two hours lab per week.
PSY 625 B/L. Psychological Testing II and Lab (Individual)(3/1)
Prerequisites: Admission to a Master’s level Graduate Program in Psychology (Clinical, General Experimental or Human Factors). Corequisite: PSY 427; PSY 625BL. Theory and practice of individual assessment of children and adolescents, focusing on assessment of behavior and social-emotional functioning. Supervised practice in test administration, interpretation, integration of data from multiple sources, and communication of results. Three hours lecture; two hours lab per week.
PSY 625C/L. Child/adolescent Psychological Assessment and Lab (3/1)
Prerequisites: Admission to a Master’s level Graduate Program in Psychology (Clinical, General Experimental or Human Factors). Corequisite: PSY 427; PSY 625CL. Theory and practice of individual assessment of intelligence and personality in non-clinical children and adolescents, as well as those referred for diagnostic assessment of attention, cognitive, learning, and/or social-emotional adjustment issues. Supervised practice in test administration, evaluation, integration of data from multiple sources, and communication of results. Three hours lecture; two hours lab per week.
PSY 625D/L. Adult Psychological Assessment and Lab (3/1)
Prerequisites: PSY 427; admission to a Master’s level Graduate Program in Psychology (Clinical, General Experimental or Human Factors). Corequisite: PSY 625DL. Theory and practice of individual assessment of intelligence and personality in non-clinical adults and with those referred for diagnostic assessment of attention, cognitive, learning, and/or social-emotional adjustment issues. Supervised practice in test administration, evaluation, integration of data from multiple sources, and communication of results. Three hours lecture; two hours lab per week.
PSY 626. Problems of the Atypical Child (3)
Prerequisite: PSY 625C/L. Application of psychological principles to the study of the atypical child, including a survey of etiological theories. Testing the atypical child. Supervised activity required.
PSY 628. Fundamentals of Psychotherapy (3)
Prerequisite: PSY 460; instructor consent. Comprehensive review of representative theories of psychotherapy and behavioral readjustment with an evaluation of the assumptions underlying these theories. Emphasis on group work in a community mental health setting. (Some sections are reserved exclusively for M.A. students in the classified graduate programs)
PSY 629. Seminar in Behavior Modification (3)
Study of theory, ethics and practices of behavior therapy and behavior modification procedures. (Consult instructor regarding practicum option.)
PSY 631. Individual Case Studies in Psychology (3)
Prerequisite: PSY 430. Seminar designed to reach a better understanding of individual personality dynamics and relevant personality theories by a detailed examination of classic and contemporary cases.
PSY 640. Advanced Social Psychology I (3)
Extensive coverage of major research and theories advanced in contemporary social psychology, with emphasis on individual behavior as a function of social variables. Topics include interpersonal attraction, person perception and attributional processes, attitude formation and change, social motivation, aggression and altruism.
PSY 641. Advanced Social Psychology II (3)
Extensive coverage of major research and theories in contemporary social psychology with emphasis on group behavior. Topics include cooperation and competition, conformity, leadership, social learning, socialization and environmental social psychology.
PSY 646. Group Dynamics and Leadership (3)
Prerequisite: PSY 345 and either 442 or 483. Study of interpersonal relations and leadership within various social organizations. Applied methods for group motivation and participation in activities toward accomplishing group goals. Supervised activity required.
PSY 655A-Z. Fieldwork in Psychological Services (1-5)
Prerequisites: instructor consent. Taught as an academic, university-based experience designed to accompany students’ supervised practica, fieldwork, and/or internship. Course content varies as a function of the practicum setting (e.g., hospital, community agency) and client age level (e.g. children, adolescents, adults). May be repeated (up to 4 semesters) and taken for varying number of units (1-5).
PSY 656A-D. Seminar in Human Factors Principles and Applications (3-3-3-3)
Prerequisite: Graduate-standing and instructor consent. Courses cover current topics in human factors as a science and a profession. Letters “A-D” represent offerings of the courses with different clusters of topics. Clusters are updated frequently to keep current with research and practice in the field. Representative topics include human-computer interaction, job analysis and design, human error measurement and classification, applied systems theory, cognitive workload assessment, virtual work systems and distributed training models, and human movement dynamics.
PSY 660. Seminar in Counseling (3)
Prerequisite: instructor consent; PSY 460. Recommended Corequisite: PSY 660T. Examination of current theoretical approaches to counseling with emphasis on applications to individual and group, children, adolescents, and families. Some sections are reserved exclusively for M.A. students in classified graduate programs.
PSY 660T. Tutorial in Counseling (1)
Prerequisite: instructor consent; PSY 460. Tutorial option for PSY 660. Examination of the problems and techniques of counseling and interviewing. Dynamics of the interpersonal relationship between counselor and counselee in relation to current theories of personality. Intensive supervised individual activity and field work to supplement classroom lectures.
PSY 678A-B. Human Performance Research in Psychology (4-4)
Prerequisite: instructor consent. Principles and methods of measuring and evaluating human performance in system design. Topics include the application of lab and simulation techniques, field studies and psychometric and survey techniques to the description of human capabilities and limitations.
PSY 682. Subsystem Integration in Human Factors Design (4)
Prerequisite: instructor consent. Project-discussion course on the human factors problems and principles involved in the design of a community service system. Emphasis on incorporating the individual student’s subsystem designs into a total integrated system.
PSY 683. Seminar in Human Relations (3)
Prerequisite: instructor consent; PSY 150. Social psychological analysis of interpersonal behavior. Analysis of group experience and research on variables involved in interpersonal and group behavior.
PSY 686. Human Factors in Complex Civil Systems (3)
Prerequisite: instructor consent. Involves the design of a major variable load-demand, responsive civil system. Emphasis devoted to failure-mode evaluation and analysis and principles of behavioral engineering. Three hours per week plus 1 hour supervised individual projects per week.
PSY 690A. Seminar in Sensation and Perception (3)
Prerequisites: Classified graduate status and instructor consent. Critical review of current literature, theories, methods and problems concerning sensory and perceptual processes.
PSY 690B. Seminar in Conditioning and Learning (3)
Prerequisites: Classified graduate status and instructor consent. Critical review of current literature, theories, methods and problems concerning conditioning and learning.
PSY 691A. Seminar in Cognition (3)
Prerequisites: Classified graduate status and instructor consent. Critical review of current literature, theories, methods, and problems concerning thinking processes and communication.
PSY 691B. Seminar in Emotion and Motivation (3)
Prerequisites: Classified graduate status and instructor consent. Critical review of current literature, theories, methods and problems concerning emotion and motivation.
PSY 692A. Seminar in Research Methodology (3)
Prerequisites: PSY 150; 321/L; 420/L; classified graduate status and instructor consent. Critical analysis of published research in terms of the underlying assumptions and stated hypothesis, adequacy of research design, appropriateness of statistical techniques employed, and the justification for conclusions and implications drawn.
PSY 696. Directed Graduate Research (3)
PSY 697. Directed Comprehensive Studies (3)
PSY 698C. Thesis or Graduate Project (3)
Prerequisites: Classified graduate status and instructor consent. Course may be repeated once.
PSY 699. Independent Study (1-3)
Prerequisites: Written proposals for Independent Study in areas of special interest to the advanced student must be submitted for departmental approval prior to registration.