Table of Contents

Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures

College of Humanities

Staff

  • Donald Lilly
  • Jennifer Lu
  • Patricia Miller (Director of the Barbara Ann Ward Language Center)

Faculty

  • John P. Adams
  • Ahmed Bouguarche
  • Brian Castronovo
  • Anthony Costantini
  • Edith Dimo
  • Akiko Hirota
  • Sirena Pellarolo
  • Adrian Pérez-Boluda
  • Elias Ramos
  • Vahram Shemmassian

Programs

Undergraduate:

  • B.A., Languages and Cultures
    Language Options: Armenian, French, German, Italian and Japanese
  • B.A., French
  • B.A., Spanish
    Language and Culture Option
    Literature Option
    Spanish Subject Matter Program for the Single Subject Credential
    Minors in Armenian, Classics, Italian, French, Japanese, Russian and Spanish

Graduate:

  • M.A., Spanish

Certificate Program

Languages other than English: Armenian, French, Italian, Japanese and Spanish.

Mission Statement

The mission of the department is to offer curricula, services and research leading to proficiency in language, literature, and culture that will enable individuals to function effectively in the international communities in our geographical area and throughout the world. The Department’s programs serve and promote all academic divisions of the University in providing our students the language and cultural training necessary to support their international and intercultural endeavors.

Department Programs

The Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures offers a wide variety of courses and programs in the fields of foreign languages, literatures and cultures. They are designed for those students who intend to major or minor in languages other than English, for students who seek a broad liberal arts education in preparation for a variety of professions, and for students whose careers will be furthered by the knowledge of another language and culture. In addition to the majors and graduate degrees, the department offers minors in Armenian, Classics, French, Italian, Japanese, Russian, and Spanish, and a number of courses in Chinese, Farsi, German, Hebrew, and Korean.

Since many students are not able to read many great works of literature in the original language, Foreign Literature in Translation (FLIT) offers the students access to them in English.

Student Learning Outcomes of the Undergraduate Program

  1. Demonstrate fluency in listening, speaking, reading and writing in the target language.
  2. Demonstrate ability to reason and present sound arguments in both oral and written discourse.
  3. Demonstrate critical thinking in the analysis of traditions, cultures, and civilizations.
  4. Understand the nature of language, its function, structure, and interactional (social) purposes.
  5. Analyze and clearly articulate interpretations of literary texts.

Credential Information

Students interested in teaching Spanish in the secondary schools should seek advisement as soon as possible. The Spanish Program currently offers a subject matter program that has been approved by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing and that meets the subject matter competency requirement for a Single Subject Credential. Students wishing to teach Spanish must choose the Language and Culture option of the major, which is designed to meet the subject matter requirements for the Single Subject teaching credential. For details on the Single Subject Credential program, see the Credentials and Department of Secondary Education sections in this catalog.

Academic Advisement

Faculty advisors are available to both undergraduate and graduate students during registration, and throughout the semester during scheduled office hours.

Credit By Challenge Examination

See individual course descriptions to find out which courses may or may not be challenged. For procedures governing the challenging of language classes, please consult with the department office.

Cooperative Program in Foreign Languages and Literatures

The Cooperative Program in Foreign Languages and Literatures gives CSUN students the opportunity, without additional fees, to take courses in foreign languages not available on this campus but offered at UCLA. In order to take advantage of this cross-enrollment option, students must be academically qualifi ed and must have valid reasons for wanting to take the courses. Students are strongly advised to enroll in the Fall term when beginning classes are off ered. The enrollment process must be completed prior to September 10. Questions regarding qualifications and enrollment procedures should be referred to the chair of the Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures.

International Studies

The Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures supports the concept of international education and encourages students to investigate opportunities for overseas study. Certain courses taken at CSU International Program Study Centers abroad are equivalent to courses in the Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures and may be used to fulfill some of the requirements for degree options off ered by the Department and/or certain General Education requirements. Please see the appropriate language advisor in MCLL prior to traveling abroad to determine these equivalencies. Students should also consult the International Programs Bulletin available in the Office of International and Exchange Programs, or the campus International Programs Advisor for more information.

Barbara Ann Ward Language Center

The Barbara Ann Ward Language Center located in Jerome Richfield (JR) 316 serves as a language acquisition and teaching resource facility primarily for the faculty and students of MCLL and the College of Humanities. Through multimedia, equipment, group and individual training available at the center, faculty and students are encouraged to use technology to enhance the language acquisition experience. You can reach the Director, Patricia Miller, at (818) 677-3452.

The Major in Languages and Cultures

The Languages and Cultures major prepares students for an increasingly globalized and interdependent world that rewards knowledge of languages and cultural literacy. Th e major provides students with advanced proficiency in language skills and cultural competency, which will enable them to expand career opportunities and enhance their personal lives in an international and intercultural environment. In addition to studies in a primary target language, students take courses in comparative study of cultures and literatures to gain insight into the interrelation of language, culture, and human nature. The two required seminars in cultural theories and methodologies constitute the capstone experience for intercultural studies. Students are also encouraged to study abroad, to take a secondary target language, and to select from a rich array of courses offered in other departments that deal with interactions among peoples, cultures, and regions.

Student Learning Outcomes of the Major in Languages and Cultures:

As a result of completing the Languages & Cultures Major, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate fluency in the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in the target language;
  2. Demonstrate the ability to reason and present sound arguments using the target language;
  3. Analyze and clearly articulate interpretations of literary texts;
  4. Demonstrate knowledge of the diversity of world cultures;
  5. Apply cultural theory to eff ectively analyze multiple forms of cultural expression and creativity.

Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts Degree

Cultural Studies Component Requirements: (18 Units)

1. Lower Division Required Course: (3 Units)

FLIT 234 Virtual Study Abroad (3)

2. Lower Division Elective: (3 Units)

Select one course from the following:

FLIT 230 Life in Modern France (3)
FLIT 245 Introduction to German Literature (3)
FLIT 250 Traditional Culture of Japan (3)
FLIT 260 Life in Modern Spain (3)
FLIT 261 Life in Modern Latin America (3)
FLIT 295A Masterpieces of European Literature I (3)
FLIT 295B Masterpieces of European Literature II (3)

3. Upper Division Required Courses: (6 Units)

FLIT 391 Cultural Theories & Methodologies (3)
FLIT 491 Capstone Seminar (3)

4. Upper Division Electives: (6 Units)

Select two courses from two different cultures, each diff erent from the course selected for the Lower Division Elective:

ARMN 310 Armenian Culture (3)
ARMN 360 Changing Roles of Armenian Women (3)
FLIT 320 Business Culture in Asia (3)
FLIT 321 Business Culture in Europe (3)
FLIT 322 Business Culture in Latin America (3)
FLIT 330 Italian Civilization from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance (3)
FLIT 331 Italian Literary Masterpieces of Humanism and Renaissance (3)
FLIT 340 Life in Modern Germany (3)
FLIT 341 20th Century European Literature (3)
FLIT 370 Modern Japanese Culture (3)
FLIT 371 Modern Italian Culture (3)
FLIT 380 Cultural Development of Modern Russia & Eastern Europe (3)
FLIT 381 Aspects of the Italian-American Experience in Cinema, Literature, Philosophy, and Music (3)
FLIT 383 Hispanic Civilization and Culture: Middle Ages to Golden Age (3)
FLIT 384 Modern Hispanic Culture (Peninsular) (3)
FLIT 402 Japanese Literature (3)
FLIT 455 Women Writers of Asia (3)

Language Option Component Requirements: (24-26 Units)

Languages & Cultures majors are strongly encouraged to study abroad, to take a secondary target language, and to select courses and a minor within their regional or thematic focus.

Total Units in the Major 42-44
General Education Units 48
Additional Units 28-30
Total Units Required for Degree 120

A. Armenian Option
Required Courses in Armenian: 24 Units

1. Lower Division: (9 Units)

ARMN 102 Elementary Armenian II (3)
ARMN 201 Intermediate Armenian I (3)
ARMN 202 Intermediate Armenian II (3)

2. Upper Division: (15 Units)

Select 5 courses from the following

ARMN 306 Advanced Armenian Composition (3)
ARMN 310 Armenian Culture (3)
ARMN 315 Masterpieces of Armenian Literature (3)
ARMN 360 Changing Roles of Armenian Women (3)
ARMN 380 Contemporary Issues in Armenia & Diaspora (3)

B. French Option
Required Courses in French: 24 Units

1. Lower Division: (9 Units)

FREN 200 Beginning French Conversation (3)
FREN 204 Review of French Grammar (3)
FREN 208 Intermediate Reading and Writing (3)

2. Upper Division: (15 Units)

FREN 300 Advanced French Conversation (3)
FREN 305 French Pronunciation and Diction (3)
FREN 306 Advanced Composition (3)
FREN 380 French Civilization (3)
FREN 381 The Contemporary French World (3)

C. Italian Option
Required Courses in Italian: 24 Units

1.Lower Division: (9 Units)

Select 3 courses from the following

ITAL 201 Intermediate Italian I (3)
ITAL 202 Intermediate Italian II (3)
ITAL 204 Intermediate Italian Grammar and Composition (3)
ITAL 290 Intermediate Reading and Conversation (3)

2. Upper Division: (15 Units)

Select 5 courses from the following

ITAL 300 Advanced Conversational Italian (3)
ITAL 305 Structure of the Italian Language (3)
ITAL 306 Italian Translation and Style (3)
ITAL 315 Masterpieces of Italian Literature (3)
ITAL 335 Italian Literature of the Middle Ages (3)
ITAL 360 Italian Literature of the XIX Century (3)
FLIT 330 Italian Civilization from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance (3)
FLIT 331 Literary Masterpieces of Italian Humanism and Renaissance (3)
FLIT 371 Modern Italian Culture (3)
FLIT 381 Aspects of the Italian-American Experience in Cinema, Literature, Philosophy, and Music (3)

D. Japanese Option
Required Courses in Japanese: 26 Units

1. Lower Division: (8 Units)

JAPN 201 Intermediate Japanese I (4)
JAPN 202 Intermediate Japanese II (4)

2. Lower Division Electives (3 Units)

Choose 1 course from the following: (3 units)

JAPN 204 Kanji II (3)
JAPN 205 Kanji III (3)
FLIT 250 Traditional Japanese Culture (3)

3. Upper Division Electives (9 Units)

Choose 3 courses from the following:

JAPN 300 Advanced Japanese Conversation (3)
JAPN 304 Advanced Grammar and Composition (3)
JAPN 305 Language and Culture in Japanese (3)
JAPN 306 Advanced Reading and Composition (3)
FLIT 370 Contemporary Japanese Culture (3)

4. Upper Division Electives (6 Units)

Choose 2 courses from the following:

JAPN 400 Japanese Language and Society (3)
JAPN 401 Introduction to Literature in Japanese (3)
FLIT 402 Japanese Literature (3)
Total Units in the Major 42-44
General Education Units 48
Additional Units 28-30
Total Units Required for a B.A. Degree 120

Armenian

Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures

Advisor
Vahram Shemmassian
Minor in Armenian

The minor in Armenian will provide students with an understanding and appreciation of the Armenian language, literature, culture, and the contributions of Armenians to world civilization. Students with previous studies in Armenian should consult an advisor for advanced placement and course selections to complete the minor.

Prerequisites (6 units)

ARMN 101 Elementary Armenian I (3)
ARMN 102 Elementary Armenian II (3)

Lower Division Required Courses (6 units)

ARMN 201 Intermediate Armenian I (3)
ARMN 202 Intermediate Armenian II (3)

Upper Division Required Courses (12 units)

ARMN 310 Armenian Culture (3)
ARMN 315 Masterpieces of Armenian Literature (3)
ARMN 380 Contemporary Issues in Armenia and the Diaspora (3)
ARMN 440 Armenian American Child (3)

Upper Division Elective Courses (6 units)

Select two from the following:

ARMN 306 Advanced Armenian Composition (3)
ARMN 317 DV Equity and Diversity (3)
ARMN 360 Changing Roles of Armenian Women (3)
ARMN 391 Language Practicum (3)
ARMN 410 Seminar in Armenian Culture (3)
ARMN 417 Equity and Diversity (3)
Total Units in the Minor 24

Course List

ARMN 101. Elementary Armenian I (3)
Study of the fundamentals of Armenian: alphabet and additional sounds, grammatical structure, reading, writing and practice in the spoken language. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
ARMN 102. Elementary Armenian II (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of ARMN 101 or equivalent. Continuation of the study of the fundamentals of Armenian. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
ARMN 201. Intermediate Armenian I (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of ARMN 102 or equivalent. Intensive practice in pronunciation, conversation and writing. Brief review of grammar and study of more advanced grammatical concepts. Introduction to reading of literature and study of Armenian culture. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
ARMN 202. Intermediate Armenian II (3)
Prerequisite: ARMN 201 or equivalent. Extensive grammar study designed to increase students’ profi ciency in writing, and to clarify and deepen their understanding of Armenian syntax. Readings and discussions of representative Armenian essays, short stories, plays and poetry. Cultural issues are an integral part of this course. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
ARMN 306. Advanced Armenian Composition (3)
Prerequisite: Upper Division standing in Armenian. Conducted in Armenian. Devoted to the analysis of diff erent types of writing patterns and to their practical application. Focuses on language syntax through the study of representative writing styles.
ARMN 310. Armenian Culture (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Covers all aspects of the Armenian Culture from ancient civilization to modern day life both in Armenia and in the Diaspora. Introduces the Armenian culture: language, literature, history including waves of immigration to the U.S. and the Genocide of 1915, religion, political parties, music, visual and performing arts, architecture, tapestry, customs, holidays, and ethnic food. Daily class participation and regular written assignments are required. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
ARMN 315. Masterpieces of Armenian Literature (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of ARMN 202 or equivalent. Introduction to the highlights of Armenian Literature from the 19th century to modern times.
ARMN 317DV. Equity and Diversity in School (3)
This course is intended to prepare teacher candidates to examine principles of educational equity, diversity, and the implementation of curricular content and school practices for elementary/secondary students. The course will focus on the history and culture of the Armenian experience and a comparative analysis will be made with other ethnic groups in California. Th is course will also engage students to examine, critique, and refl ect on their personal biases toward children of Armenian heritage.
ARMN 360. Changing Roles of Armenian Women (3)
Prerequisite: Upper Division standing. Completion of the Lower Division writing requirement. The course explores changing roles of Armenian women with particular emphasis on new defi nitions and options in the family, community and society. The course perspective is international and comparative with significant focus on Armenia and the Diaspora. Also, the course concentrates on the educational, economic, and political changes that support the upward movement of women in the U.S.A. Students will explore available resources and organizations within Armenian communities and gain appreciation of the roles of women as agents of change. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
ARMN 380. Contemporary Issues in Armenia and the Diaspora (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Study of contemporary domestic and international issues in Armenia and the Armenian Diaspora, with emphasis on Armenians in America. Includes an analysis of Armenian Genocide as an historical issue having contemporary relevance, and a focused examination of current-event issues such as immigration, assimilation, social and political activities of community organizations, and participation in the American democratic process. Attention is also given to the changes brought about by the influx of Eastern Armenians into established Western Armenian communities in the U.S. following the fall of the USSR and the reemergence of an independent Armenia.
ARMN 391. Language Practicum (3)
Prerequisite: ARMN 202 or instructor consent. A Language Practicum is a course in which fi eld experience is the predominant learning mode, and it can include a community service-learning and other practical experiences in Armenian-speaking organizations approved by the MCLL Department, such as Armenian schools, social welfare, political or other community organizations. Faculty assist students in obtaining appropriate placement. The field work shall require an extensive use of the target language and exposure to the target culture. Emphasis will be on the development of appropriate professional vocabulary as well as speaking and comprehension skills, and culturally-appropriate interaction skills. The field work is complemented by academic study and written assignments. May be repeated once. (Credit/No Credit Only)
ARMN 396A-Z. Experimental Topics in Armenian (3)
ARMN 410. Seminar in Armenian Culture (3)
Prerequisites: Completion of the lower-division writing requirement; ARMN 310; and another upper-division Armenian course. Examines in detail some fundamental aspects of Armenian culture that shaped the identity of the Armenians people through 3,000 years of history. The topics, which may differ from one semester to another, may include: Pre-Christian culture; the impact of Christianity on language, literature, and art; illuminated manuscript art; the Enlightenment of the 18th century; the Renaissance of the 19th century; the impact of the Genocide on culture; culture in the First Republic of Armenia (1918-1920), Soviet Armenia (1920-1991), and the modern Republic of Armenia (since 1991); and culture of the Diaspora.
ARMN 417. Equity and Diversity in School (3)
Prepares teacher candidates to examine principles of educational equity, diversity, and the implementation of curriculum content and school practices for elementary/secondary students. Focuses on the history and culture of a specific ethnic experience and a comparative analysis is made with other ethnic groups in California. Engages students to examine, critique, and refl ect on their personal biases regarding children of color. (Cross listed with AAS, CHS, ELPS, PAS 417)
ARMN 440. Armenian American Child (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of lower division writing requirement. Study of the development of the Armenian child with particular emphasis on bicultural and bilingual issues that may infl uence educational progress. Culturally relevant socialization patterns of children from Armenia and the Armenian Diaspora are examined. Intended for prospective teachers and students interested in human services. (Available for Section A of the Multicultural requirement for Credential Candidates)
ARMN 496A-Z. Experimental Topics in Armenian (3)
ARMN 499A-C Independent Study (1-3)

Chinese

Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures

Course List

CHIN 101. Elementary Mandarin Chinese I and Lab (4)
Not open to students with oral profi ciency or who have attended schools where Mandarin was the language of instruction. Study of the fundamentals of Mandarin Chinese: grammatical structure, reading, practice in the spoken language. May not be challenged. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
CHIN 102. Elementary Mandarin Chinese II and Lab (4)
Preparatory: Completion of CHIN 101 or instructor consent. Not open to students with oral profi ciency or who have attended schools where Mandarin was the language of instruction. Continuation of the study of the fundamentals of Mandarin Chinese. May not be challenged. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
CHIN 201. Intermediate Mandarin Chinese I (3)
Prerequisite: CHIN 102 or equivalent. May not be challenged if principal schooling has been in Mandarin. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
CHIN 202. Intermediate Mandarin Chinese II (3)
Prerequisite: CHIN 201.Recapitulation of basic grammar; intense practice in reading and writing; reading of short stories, poems and essays, and analysis of the reading. May not be challenged if principal schooling has been in Mandarin. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
CHIN 499A-C. Independent Study (1-3)

Minor in Classics

Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures

Advisor
John Adams
The Minor

The Classics section offers courses in Greek and Latin languages, literatures, and civilizations. The minor is designed for students who desire to become acquainted with the literature and culture of Ancient Greece and Rome, who need Latin as a necessary background for an understanding of the development of the Romance Languages, or who plan to teach. Students with advanced placement:

  1. Cannot receive credit for courses below the level at which they are enrolled
  2. Must include additional courses approved by an advisor to complete the minor

Requirements for the Minor

  1. Lower Division Required Courses (12 Units)
CLAS 101L Elementary Latin I (3)
CLAS 102L Elementary Latin II (3)
CLAS 201L Intermediate Latin I (3)
CLAS 202L Intermediate Latin II (3)
  1. Upper Division Required Courses (12 Units)
CLAS 315 Greek and Roman Mythology (3)
FLIT 423 The Greek and Roman Epic in Translation (3)
FLIT 424 Drama of Greece and Rome (3)
FLIT 480 Greek and Roman Literature in Translation (3)

Note that interviews with instructors designed to place lower division students at appropriate levels of language achievement given before registration week.

Total Units in the General Minor 24

Course List

CLAS 101G. Elementary Greek I (3)
Fundamentals of Attic Greek; reading of a simplified nature from Xenophon’s Anabasis. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
CLAS 101L. Elementary Latin I (3)
Introduction to the structure of Latin with emphasis on reading Latin and on the role of Latin to the development of English. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
CLAS 102G. Elementary Greek II (3)
Continuation of Elementary Greek I. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
CLAS 102L. Elementary Latin II (3)
Continuation of CLAS 101. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
CLAS 201L. Intermediate Latin I (3)
Prerequisite: CLAS 102L. Reading and analysis of selected Latin prose.
CLAS 202L. Intermediate Latin II (3)
Prerequisite: CLAS 201L. Reading and analysis of classical Latin poetry.
CLAS 315. Greek and Roman Mythology (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement.Conducted in English. Study of the myths of Greeks and Romans and of their impact on the literature of the Western world. (Available for General Education, Arts and Humanities)
CLAS 496A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in Classics (3)
Prerequisite: Upper Division standing. Selected topics in Classics with course content to be determined.
CLAS 499G. Independent Study – Greek (1-3)
CLAS 499L. Independent Study – Latin (1-3)

Foreign Literatures in English Translation (FLIT)

Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures

In addition to its traditional curricula, the Department offers a number of foreign literature and culture courses taught in English that are designed for students who do not have the background to read the works in the original language. Students are urged to consult the Foreign Literatures in Translation (FLIT) Section in the Schedule of Classes for off erings in Selected Topics courses.

Course List

FLIT 150. Gateways to Western Civilization: Greece and Rome (3)
May not be taken by students who have completed FLIT 350. Conducted in English. Basic elements of modern civilization have their origins in Greece and Rome. Emphasis on historical development and on their impact on contemporary society. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
FLIT 234. Virtual Study Abroad (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. This course will seek to give students a simulated experience of studying abroad via technology mediation and exposure to people and products from international cultures. Th rough the virtual exposure to global cultures and research projects, students will learn to use technology to access information sources, develop strategies to evaluate the accuracy and usefulness of information, and investigate how cultural information and products impact individuals and society. The course will help students to become discriminating consumers of cultural products and sophisticated global citizens with skills to interact with diverse people in a culturally appropriate manner in their professional and personal lives. (Available for General Education, Lifelong Learning)(IC)
FLIT 250. Traditional Culture of Japan (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement.Conducted in English. The course explores the traditions that inform the values and aesthetics of present-day Japan and make one of the most technologically advanced nations distinctly Asian and traditional. It also examines the foreign influences on Japan, the modifications that were made to suit Japanese taste, and influences of Japan on other countries. The areas investigated include indigenous beliefs, religious and philosophical teachings that inform the arts and martial arts, and various aesthetic principles and their manifestations in poetry, theater, and other arts. (Available for General Education:, Arts and Humanities)
FLIT 260. Life and Thought in Modern Spain (3)
Prerequisite: No knowledge of Spanish required. Cannot be applied toward the major or minor requirements in Spanish. A study of the ideas and events that have influenced the development of modern Spanish intellectual and social life. Special emphasis will be placed on intellectual currents. To be conducted in English.
FLIT 295A. Masterpieces of European Literature I (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Conducted in English. Introduction to masterpieces of European literature from the Middle Ages through the Classical period. (Available for General Education, Arts and Humanities)
FLIT 295B. Masterpieces of European Literature II (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Conducted in English. Introduction to masterpieces of European literature from Romanticism to the modern period. (Available for General Education, Arts and Humanities)
FLIT 320. Business Culture in Asia (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. In this course students interested in international business develop crosscultural sensitivity and communication skills in order to achieve progress toward global competence. Students learn to research and assess cultural issues and political and economic risks and opportunities in Asia, and to become sensitive to interpersonal cues, rules of behavior, and other norms. Students examine factors that affect business practices and consumer behavior, such as religions, gender roles, socialization patterns, and socio-cultural and economic demography in Asia. The skills that students develop in this course may be applied in career settings to help ensure, for instance, that business plans and longterm strategic goals are culturally appropriate. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies) (IC)
FLIT 321. Business Culture in Europe (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. In this course students interested in international business develop cross-cultural sensitivity and communication skills in order to achieve progress toward global competence. Students learn to research and assess cultural issues and political and economic risks and opportunities in Europe, and to become sensitive to interpersonal cues, rules of behavior, and other norms. Students examine factors that aff ect business practices and consumer behavior, such as religions, gender roles, socialization patterns, and socio-cultural and economic demography in Europe. The skills that students develop in this course may be applied in career settings to help ensure, for instance, that business plans and longterm strategic goals can be conducted in culturally appropriate ways. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies) (IC)
FLIT 322. Business Culture in Latin America (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. The course focuses on the identification of cultural differences in customs, customer needs and expectations, communication, and socialization patterns. It will examine cultural factors that affect consumer behavior, such as religions, beliefs, philosophies, sacred objects, cultural taboos, gender roles, and socio-cultural and economic demography. Issues that affect business practices in a region will also be studied, such as cost and competitive factors, appropriate sales and advertising techniques, human resources and employment practices, corruption, government control, issues of major trade agreements and laws regulating international business. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)(IC)
FLIT 330. Italian Civilization from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance (3)
Focuses on those elements that shaped the Italian “mind” and “spirit” and formed that unique culture that was at the roots of Western Civilization. Deals with a series of intellectual and artistic manifestations of Italian Culture as incorporated in a variety of disciplines (religion, music, art, literature, economics, and philosophy), spanning from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance.
FLIT 331. Literary Masterpieces of Italian Humanism and Renaissance Literature (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirements. Conducted in English. No background of Italy or knowledge of the language required. This course offers students an in-depth study of major Italian literary masterpieces (fiction, poetry, and drama) and aesthetic theories developed during the period of Humanism and Renaissance (1380-1550). Such a study will allow students to appreciate the importance of new literary, spiritual, and human values that emerged at that time and the unique role played by Italian Humanism and Renaissance on European literature and civilization. (Available for General Education, Arts and Humanities)
FLIT 350. Classical World and Western Civilization (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Conducted in English. May not be taken by students who have completed FLIT 150. Examines the infl uence of the ancient Greek and Roman cultures on Western Civilization. Includes an examination of primary materials, e.g., inscriptions, documents, poems, plays, historical writings, etc., which become the subjects for extensive study for reports and papers. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
FLIT 370. Modern Japanese Culture (3)
Conducted in English. No background knowledge of Japan or the language is required. Explores the country that quickly modernized and westernized to become an economic and industrial force in the world and yet remains distinctly Asian. Examines the Japanese people and culture and their recent changes, and the current critical issues in Japan, such as the changes in the basic values, philosophy, and behavior that the recent political, economic, and social situations have wrought. Compares the interpretations and presentations of Japanese culture made by the Japanese and the non-Japanese, by scholars and popular writers, in order to learn to critically look at issues from various perspectives. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
FLIT 371. Modern Italian Culture (3)
Conducted in English. Meets the upper division General Education writing requirements. Survey of contemporary Italy. Captures the major literary and cultural aspects and examines the social relations, customs, traditions, and productive forces that have contributed to the emergence of Italy as a leading industrial European country. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
FLIT 380. Cultural Development of Modern Russia and Eastern Europe (3)
Conducted in English. Examines the cultural history and current developments of the Slavic people in the Russian States and Eastern Europe, and traces the role of these people in American culture and society. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
FLIT 381. Aspects of the Italian-American Experience in Cinema, Literature, Philosophy and Music (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirements. Conducted in English. This course will examine different individuals within the Italian-American experience, exploring their contributions in the fields of cinema, literature, philosophy, and classical music, and how through each we see an additional paradigm offered in and to the mainstream artistic and humanistic endeavor in the United States of America. (Available for General Education, Art and the Humanities)(IC)
FLIT 383. Hispanic Civilization and Culture: Middle Ages to Golden Age (3)
Conducted in English. No background knowledge of Spain or Spanish is required. This course meets the upper division General Education writing requirements. This course is a survey of the Middle Ages and the Golden Age : 1040-1700; captures major literary and cultural age aspects; and examines the social relations, customs, traditions, and productive forces that transitioned Spain from Kingdoms to Empire. (Available for General Education: Art and Humanities).
FLIT 384. Modern Hispanic Culture (Peninsular) (3)
Conducted in English. No background of Spain or Spanish is required. Meets the upper division General Education writing requirements. This course is a survey of contemporary Spain, and captures its major literary and cultural aspects; examines the social relations, customs, traditions, and productive forces that had taking Spain to a new era and globalization; it conveys the Hispanic spirit and its Twentieth Century lifestyle. (Available for General Education: Art and Humanities).
FLIT 391. Cultural Th eories and Methodologies (3-3)
Preparatory: FLIT 234. Intensive interdisciplinary study of an age, movement, problem, or theme, with emphasis on the practices and methodologies of intercultural study. The topic of the seminar varies. May be repeated once for credit. (Cross-listed with HUM 391)
FLIT 396A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses (3)
FLIT 402. Japanese Literature (3)
Conducted in English. Survey of Japanese literature from earliest times to the present with particular emphasis on Japanese cultural values as applied to Western literary forms.
FLIT 423. The Greek and Roman Epic in Translation (3)
Conducted in English. Traces the development of the epic genre in antiquity. Emphasis on readings from Homer’s Iliad, Odyssey, and Virgil’s Aeneid. (Cross-listed with ENGL 423)
FLIT 424. Drama of Greece and Rome (3)
Conducted in English. Analysis of major Greek and Roman plays as literature and as works for the theater. (Cross-listed with ENGL 424)
FLIT 426. Drama from 1660 to Ibsen (3)
Conducted in English. Study of signifi cant plays of the Neoclassic period, Romanticism, Realism, and Naturalism. (Cross-listed with ENGL 426)
FLIT 427. Drama from Ibsen to the Present (3)
Conducted in English. Development of significant theater movements in Europe and America; intensive study of selected plays. (Cross-listed with ENGL 427)
FLIT 455. Women Writers of Asia (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Conducted in English. Study of selected literary works by women of Asia. Examines the role of gender and women’s creativity in response to the religious and ideological currents and social conditions in the region.
FLIT 480. Greek and Roman Literature in Translation (3)
Conducted in English. Study of representative works of classical literature in translation; consideration of their contributions to western thought. (Cross-listed with ENGL 480)
FLIT 485. Major Russian Writers (3)
Conducted in English. Study of major Russian writers with emphasis on writers of the pre-revolutionary period. (Cross-listed with ENGL 485)
FLIT 491. Capstone Seminar (3)
Prerequisite: FLIT 391. Intensive interdisciplinary study of an age, movement, problem, or theme, with emphasis on the application of cultural theory in interdisciplinary study. The topic of the seminar varies. Students will complete a senior project such as a research paper or a creative performance that demonstrates the integrated knowledge, understanding, and linguistic skills they have gained in the course of studies in the Major. The project will be presented in English to fellow students and MCLL faculty members at the senior presentation. May be repeated once for credit with a diff erent topic. (Cross-listed with HUM 491 and LRS 491)
FLIT 496A–Z. Experimental Topics Courses (FLIT)(3)
Prerequisite: Upper Division standing. Conducted in English. Selected topics in Foreign Literature in Translation with course content to be determined.
FLIT 499A-C. Independent Study (1-3)

French

Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures

Advisor
Ahmed Bouguarche

Degrees Offered

B.A., French

The Major

The French major is designed for student who wish to prepare for a career in teaching or for one in which a strong background in French language and culture is essential. By completing the major, the student is prepared to pursue graduate work in French/ Francophone literatures and cultures.

Students with some knowledge of French wishing to take lowerdivision courses should take the French placement exam before registration. The exam is available on a drop-in basis at certain hours or by appointment in the Barbara Ann Ward Language Center (BAWLC), JR 316.

Students with advanced placement cannot receive credit for courses below the level at which they are enrolled. However, 200-level classes may be waived or replaced by appropriate classes. Please consult an advisor.

Careers

In our multicultural, global community French, with over 150,000,000 speakers, in 52 countries, is a major means of communication between peoples in over forty countries of the world. As such, it is essential both for students who anticipate a career as teachers of French language, civilization and culture and for those who see the study of French as an adjunct to studies in another field. Careers for these students are available in such areas as: international business, the tourist industry (including hotel and restaurant management) and public services, both with local and national governmental agencies and with international agencies such as the UN, NAFTA and the European community.

Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts Degree

  1. Lower Division Required Courses (9 Units)
FREN 200 Beginning French Conversation (3)
FREN 204 Review of French Grammar (3)
FREN 208 Intermediate Reading and Writing (3)
  1. Lower Division Electives (3 Units)

Choose one from the following:

FLIT 295A Masterpieces of European Literature I (3)
FLIT 295B Masterpieces of European Literature II (3)
  1. Upper Division Required Courses (21 Units)
FREN 300 Advanced French Conversation (3)
FREN 305 French Pronunciation and Diction (3)
FREN 315A Masterpieces of French Literature I (3)
FREN 315B Masterpieces of French Literature II (3)
FREN 380 French Civilization (3)
FREN 381 The Contemporary French World (3)
LING 417 Language Development and Acquisition (3)
  1. Upper Division Electives (15 Units)

Choose one course from the following:(3 units)

FREN 312 Readings in French for Business (3)
FREN 405 Art of Translation (3)

Choose one course from the following:(3 units)

ANTH 310 Anthropological Linguistics (3)
ENGL 301 Language and Linguistics (3)
COMS 420 Language and Symbolic Processes (3)

Choose two courses from the following:(6 units)

FREN 306 Advanced Composition (3)
FREN 313 Beginning Commercial Correspondence (3)
FREN 406 Textual Analysis and Composition (3)

Choose one course from the following:(3 units)

FREN 415D French Drama (3)
FREN 415F French Fiction (3)
FREN 415P French Poetry (3)

General Education: The French major satisfies the Arts and Humanities Requirement of GE. Anthropology 310 (if taken) satisfies Comparative Cultural Studies GE requirement.

Total Units in the Major 48
General Education Units 46-49
Additional Units 17-20
Total Units Required for a B.A. Degree 120
Minors in French

General Minor or Minor in French for Business Majors

A. General Minor

  1. Lower Division Required Courses (9 Units)
FREN 200 Beginning French Conversation (3)
FREN 204 Review of French Grammar (3)
FREN 208 Intermediate Reading and Writing (3)
  1. 2. Upper Division Required Courses (6 Units)
FREN 305 French Pronunciation and Diction (3)
FREN 306 Advanced Composition (3)
  1. Upper Division Electives (9 Units)

Choose one from the following:

FREN 315A Masterpieces of French Literature I (3)
FREN 315B Masterpieces of French Literature II (3)

Choose one from the following:

FREN 380 French Civilization (3)
FREN 381 The Contemporary French World (3)

One additional upper division course chosen in consultation with an advisor (3 Units).

Total Units in the General Minor 24

B. Minor In French for Business Majors

  1. Lower Division Required Courses (9 Units)
FREN 200 Beginning French Conversation (3)
FREN 204 Review of French Grammar (3)
FREN 208 Intermediate Reading and Writing (3)
  1. Upper Division Required Courses (15 Units)
FREN 300 Advanced Conversation (3)
FREN 306 Advanced Composition (3)
FREN 312 Readings in French for Business (3)
FREN 313 Beginning Commercial Correspondence (3)
FREN 381 The Contemporary French World (3)
Total Units in the French for Business Minor 24

Course List

FREN 101. Elementary French I and Lab (4)
Not open to students who have attended schools where French was the language of instruction. Study of the fundamentals of French: grammatical structures, reading, practice in the spoken language. May not be challenged. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
FREN 102. Elementary French II and Lab (4)
Prerequisites: FREN 101. Not open to students who have attended schools where French was the language of instruction. Continuation of the study of the fundamentals of French: grammatical structures, reading, practice in the spoken language. May not be challenged. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
FREN 200. Beginning French Conversation (3)
Prerequisite: FREN 102 or equivalent. Not open to students who have attended schools where French was the language of instruction. Intended to develop students’ aural-oral skills and to improve their fluency in spoken French. May not be challenged. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
FREN 204. Review of French Grammar (3)
Prerequisite: FREN 102. Recommended Corequisite: FREN 208. Extensive grammar study intended to clarify and deepen the students’ understanding of French grammar through a thorough review of its basic concepts. May not be challenged if principal schooling has been in French. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
FREN 208. Intermediate French Reading and Writing (3)
Prerequisite: FREN 102 or equivalent. Students acquire the techniques and strategies necessary to read and write French at appropriate intermediate levels. May not be challenged if principal schooling has been in French.
FREN 300. Advanced French Conversation (3)
Prerequisite: Upper Division standing in French. Not open to students who have attended schools where French was the language of instruction. Intended to encourage majors and minors in French engaged in the junior-year program to develop further their ability to express themselves in the French language. May not be challenged.
FREN 305. French Pronunciation and Diction (3)
Prerequisite: Upper Division standing in French. Applied phonetics. Students apply what they learn about the nature of French sounds toward improving their pronunciation by means of dramatic readings ranging from simple prose to poetry and drama.
FREN 306. Advanced Composition (3)
Prerequisites: Upper Division standing in French. Devoted to the analysis of types of French style and to the practical application of these type patterns in writing.
FREN 312. Readings in French for Business (3)
Prerequisite: Upper Division standing in French. Preparatory: Completion of FREN 306. Readings and discussion of texts dealing with various aspects of business, designed to introduce the students to the basic vocabulary and structures of commercial French.
FREN 313. Beginning Commercial Correspondence (3)
Prerequisites: FREN 312. Introduction to the basic principles of business correspondence in French.
FREN 315A. Masterpieces of French Literature (3)
Prerequisite: Upper Division standing in French. Introduction to the highlights of French literature from the Middle Ages to the Classical period.
FREN 315B. Masterpieces of French Literature II (3)
Prerequisite: Upper Division standing in French. Introduction to the highlights of French literature from the 18th century to the contemporary period.
FREN 380. French Civilization (3)
Prerequisite: Upper Division standing in French. Study of the historical, cultural, and societal evolution of the French people from the earliest records to the contemporary period.
FREN 381. The Contemporary French World (3)
Prerequisite: Upper Division standing in French. Advanced conversation, focusing on aspects of modern culture.
FREN 391. Language Practicum (3)
Prerequisites: FREN 204 or instructor consent. A Language Practicum is a course in which field experience is the predominant learning mode, and it can include a community service-learning and other practical experiences in French-speaking organizations approved by the MCLL Department, such as French schools, social welfare, political or other community organizations. Faculty assist students in obtaining appropriate placement. The field work shall require an extensive use of the target language and exposure to the target culture. Emphasis will be on the development of appropriate professional vocabulary as well as speaking and comprehension skills, and culturally-appropriate interaction skills. The field work is complemented by academic study and written assignments. May be repeated once. (Credit/No Credit Only)
FREN 405. The Art of Translation (3)
Prerequisite: Upper Division standing in French or instructor consent. Examination of the similarities and diff erences between English and French idiom and syntax by means of translation exercises ranging from colloquial to literary in nature.
FREN 406. Textual Analysis and Composition (3)
Prerequisites: FREN 306 or 313, and 315A or 315B. Preparatory: It is recommended that this course be taken before enrollment in FREN 415D, 415F, 415P. Assists students in acquiring literary analytical faculties and in applying these stylistic techniques to written analysis based upon classroom discussion, explication in class, and students’ developing sensitivities to structure, style, and composition.
FREN 415D. French Drama (3)
Prerequisite: Upper Division standing in French. Preparatory: FREN 406. Examination of French drama from the medieval period to the 20th century.
FREN 415F. French Fiction (3)
Prerequisite: Upper Division standing in French. Preparatory: FREN 406. Study of selected French novels and short stories tracing the development of the genre from the Middle Ages to the present.
FREN 415P. French Poetry (3)
Prerequisite: Upper Division standing in French or instructor consent. Preparatory: FREN 406. Study of French poetry as a genre from its origins to its modern manifestations in the 19th and 20th centuries.
FREN 496A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in French Literature (3)
Prerequisites: Senior standing and one upper division course in French literature. Selected topics in French literature with course content to be determined.
FREN 499A-C. Independent Study (1-3)

German

Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures

Course List

GERM 101. Elementary German I and Lab (4)
Not open to students who have attended schools where German was the language of instruction. Study of the fundamentals of German grammatical structures, reading, practice in the spoken language. May not be challenged. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
GERM 102. Elementary German II and Lab (4)
Prerequisite: Completion of GERM 101 or equivalent. Not open to students who have attended schools where German was the language of instruction. Continuation of the study of the fundamentals of German: grammatical structures, reading, practice in the spoken language. May not be challenged. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
GERM 201. Intermediate German (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of GERM 102 or equivalent. Brief review of grammar and study of more advanced grammatical concepts. Introduction to the reading of literature. May not be challenged if principal schooling has been in German. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
GERM 202. Intermediate German Reading (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of GERM 201 or equivalent. Recommended Corequisite: GERM 204. Readings and discussion of German essays, short stories, poetry, and plays. No formal grammar. May not be challenged if principal schooling has been in German. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
GERM 204. Intensive German Grammar (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of GERM 201 or equivalent. Recommended Corequisite: GERM 202. One-semester course consisting of extensive grammar review. May not be challenged if principal schooling has been in German. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)

Hebrew

Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures

Course List

HEBR 101. Elementary Hebrew I and Lab (4)
Not open to students who have attended schools where Hebrew was the language of instruction. Only open to students who are beginning their study of Hebrew. Study of the fundamentals of Hebrew: grammatical structure, reading, practice in the spoken language. May not be challenged. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
HEBR 102. Elementary Hebrew II and Lab (4)
Prerequisite: Completion of HEBR 101. Not open to students who have attended schools where Hebrew was the language of instruction. Continuation of the study of the fundamentals of Hebrew: grammatical structure, reading, practice in the spoken language. May not be challenged. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
HEBR 201. Intermediate Hebrew I (3)
Prerequisite: HEBR 102. May not be challenged if principal schooling has been in Hebrew. Th ree hours lecture. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)

Italian

Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures

Advisor
Anthony Costantini

Minor

The minor in Italian offers students the opportunity to attain an advanced level of proficiency in Italian language along with an in-depth study of the culture that has shaped Italian society past and present. Students with previous studies in Italian should consult the advisor for advanced placement and course selections to complete the minor. Those students interested in pursuing careers to teach in Elementary or Secondary Education should also consult with the advisor in order to plan their program of studies.

Student Learning Outcomes of the Undergraduate Program

Students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate advanced level competence in understanding, speaking, reading and writing in Italian.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge in the fundamental historical and cultural events that shaped present day Italy.
  3. Analyze and articulate interpretations of literary works.

Careers

The minor in Italian prepares students for teaching Italian and for career opportunities in business and the arts

  1. Lower Division Required Courses (9 Units)
ITAL 201 Intermediate Italian 1 (3)
ITAL 202 Intermediate Italian 2 (3)
ITAL 204 Intermediate Italian Grammar and Composition (3)
ITAL 290 Intermediate Reading and Conversation (3)
  1. Upper Division Required Courses (12 Units)
ITAL 300 Advanced Conversational Italian (3)
ITAL 305 Structure of the Italian Language (3)
ITAL 306 Italian Translation and Style (3)
ITAL 315 Masterpieces of Italian Literature (3)
ITAL 335 Italian Literature of the Middle Ages (3)
ITAL 360 Italian Literature of the XIX Century (3)
FLIT 330 Italian Civilization from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance (3)
FLIT 331 Literary Masterpieces of Italian Humanism and Renaissance (3)
FLIT 371 Modern Italian Culture (3)
FLIT 381 Aspects of Italian-American Experience in Cinema, Literature, and Music (3)
ITAL 496A-Z Experimental Topics Courses in Italian Literature (3)
Total Units Required in the General Minor 21

Course List

ITAL 101. Elementary Italian I and Lab (4)
Not open to students who have attended schools where Italian was the language of instruction. Study of the fundamentals of Italian: grammatical structures, reading, practice in the spoken language. May not be challenged. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
ITAL 102. Elementary Italian II and Lab (4)
Prerequisite: Completion of ITAL 101 or equivalent. Not open to students who have attended schools where Italian was the language of instruction. Continuation of the study of the fundamentals of Italian: grammatical structures, reading, practice in the spoken language. May not be challenged. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
ITAL 201. Intermediate Italian I (3)
Prerequisite: ITAL 102. May not be challenged if principal schooling has been in Italian. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
ITAL 202. Intermediate Italian II (3)
Prerequisite: ITAL 201. Recommended Corequisite: ITAL 204. Brief review of grammar. Intensive practice in pronunciation and conversation. Reading of essays, short stories, plays, study of some problems pertinent to Italian culture. May not be challenged if principal schooling has been in Italian. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
ITAL 204. Intermediate Italian Grammar and Composition (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of ITAL 201 or instructor consent. Recommended Corequisite: ITAL 202. One-semester course for non-native speakers consisting of extensive grammar review and literary composition. May not be challenged if principal schooling has been in Italian. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
ITAL 290. Intermediate Reading and Conversation (3)
Prerequisite: Italian 202 or equivalent. This course will offer the opportunity to increase functional language competence. Reading comprehension and communicative skills will be fostered with the use of active vocabulary, media presentations, and performances. Guided conversations, reading, and pronunciation will emphasize the development of accurate idiomatic expressions. Use of Internet resources and multimedia materials will be an integral part of this course. Course will target computer literacy and technology competencies.
ITAL 300. Advanced Conversational Italian (3)
Prerequisite: ITAL 204. One-semester course intended to encourage students to further develop their ability to express themselves in the Italian language.
ITAL 305. Structure of the Italian Language (3)
Prerequisite: ITAL 204. One-semester course devoted to the analysis of the structure of Italian.
ITAL 306. Translation and Style (3)
Prerequisite: Italian 204 or permission of the instructor. This course is designed to help students enhance their mastery of the Italian language through translation from English into Italian and Italian into English. This course is a study of the syntactic, morphemic, and semantic structures of both languages. Texts to be translated will include literary excerpts, newspaper articles, business letters, technical and scientific material, and a variety of essays. This course will allow students to understand the various stylistic diff erences between Italian and English, to increase vocabulary profi ciency, and above all, to achieve a higher writing competence in the target language.
ITAL 315. Masterpieces of Italian Literature (3)
Prerequisite: ITAL 202. Presents the highlights of Italian literature from its origins to the contemporary period.
ITAL 335. Italian Literature of the Middle Ages (3)
Prerequisite: ITAL 204 or permission of the instructor. This course offers students a view of major Italian literary schools and works of writers of the Middle Ages.
ITAL 360. Italian Literature of the 19th Century (3)
Prerequisite: ITAL 204 or equivalent. Offers students of Italian a view of the literary movements (Classicism, Romanticism, Realism, Positivism, Verism, Symbolism) and of the works of major Italian poets and writers of the 19th Century.
ITAL 391. Language Practicum (3)
Prerequisites: ITAL 202 or instructor consent. A Language Practicum is a course in which fi eld experience is the predominant learning mode, and it can include a community service-learning and other practical experiences in Italian-speaking organizations approved by the MCLL Department, such as Italian schools, social welfare, political or other community organizations. Faculty assist students in obtaining appropriate placement. The field work shall require an extensive use of the target language and exposure to the target culture. Emphasis will be on the development of appropriate professional vocabulary as well as speaking and comprehension skills, and culturally-appropriate interaction skills. The field work is complemented by academic study and written assignments. May be repeated once. (Credit/No Credit Only)
ITAL 396A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in Italian Literature (3)
Prerequisites: ITAL 204 or equivalent. Experimental topics in Italian literature or linguistics with content to be determined.
ITAL 496A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in Italian Literature (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of ITAL 315. Selected topics in Italian literature with course content to be determined.
ITAL 499A-C. Independent Study (1-3)

Japanese

Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures

Advisor
Akiko Hirota

The Minor

The Minor in Japanese is designed to provide students with language training and an understanding of Japanese society and culture as revealed through the study of the language and literature. Students with previous studies in Japanese should consult the advisor for advanced placement and course selections to complete the minor. Successful completion of the Minor in Japanese will be noted on the student’s official CSUN transcript.

Student Learning Outcomes of the Undergraduate Program

As appropriate to the level completed, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate fluency in the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Japanese.
  2. Acquire knowledge of Japanese culture and tradition.
  3. Demonstrate ability to reason and present sound arguments using the Japanese language.
  4. Analyze and articulate interpretations of literary texts.

Careers

The minor prepares students for teaching Japanese as well as for graduate programs in area studies, business and law that require the knowledge of the Japanese language. It also helps students in careers in international business and law, public and community service, and communication and the media.

  1. Prerequisites for the Minor
JAPN 101 Elementary Japanese I (4)
JAPN 102 Elementary Japanese II (4)
  1. Lower Division Required Courses (8 Units)
JAPN 201 Intermediate Japanese I (4)
JAPN 202 Intermediate Japanese II (4)
  1. Lower Division Elective Courses (3 Units)

Select one course from the following:

JAPN 105 Kanji I (3)
JAPN 204 Kanji II (3)
JAPN 205 Kanji III (3)
FLIT 250 Traditional Culture of Japan (3)
  1. Upper Division Required Courses (9 Units)

Select three courses from the following:

JAPN 300 Advanced Japanese Conversation (3)
JAPN 304 Advanced Grammar and Composition (3)
JAPN 305 Language and Culture in Japanese (3)
JAPN 306 Advanced Reading and Composition (3)
FLIT 370 Contemporary Japanese Culture (3)
FLIT 402 Japanese Literature (3)
Total Units Required for the General Minor 20

Course List

JAPN 101. Elementary Japanese I and Lab (4)
Not open to students with oral profi ciency or who have attended schools where Japanese was the language of instruction. Study of the fundamentals of Japanese: grammatical structure, reading, practice in the spoken language. May not be challenged. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
JAPN 102. Elementary Japanese II and Lab (4)
Prerequisite: JAPN 101 or equivalent. Not open to students with oral proficiency or who have attended schools where Japanese was the language of instruction. Continuation of the study of the fundamentals of Japanese: grammatical structure, reading, practice in the spoken language. May not be challenged. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
JAPN 105. Kanji I (3)
Prerequisite: JAPN 101 or equivalent. Can be taken concurrently with JAPN 102. Students learn to read and write 250 basic kanji, and learn to use them in context. Th e course provides students with the opportunity to further their study of Japanese language and culture and to increase functional language competence. Reading comprehension and writing skills will be targeted with the use of readings, compositions, and exercises, including web-based programs and reading materials. The course will include formal study of language structure, although not as the central focus of the course content. The course will be particularly helpful to students planning to learn as many kanji as possible, and eventually all the 1,950 “Kanji for Common Use.” (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
JAPN 201. Intermediate Japanese I and Lab (4)
Prerequisite: JAPN 102 or equivalent. Japanese students with sufficient oral fluency and knowledge of fewer than 100 kanji (Chinese characters) may enroll in 201 only. Study of grammar and sentence patterns and written. May not be challenged. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
JAPN 202. Intermediate Japanese II AND Labs (4)
Prerequisite: JAPN 201 or equivalent. Students with sufficient oral proficiency and knowledge of fewer than 250 kanji may enroll in 202 only. May not be challenged. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
JAPN 204. Kanji II (3)
Prerequisite: JAPN 102 or equivalent. Can be taken concurrently with JAPN 201. Students learn to read and write 500 basic kanji, and learn to use them in context. The course will provide students with the opportunity to further their study of Japanese language and culture and to increase functional language competence. Reading comprehension and writing skills will be targeted with the use of readings, compositions, and exercises, including web-based programs and reading materials. The course will include formal study of language structure, although not as the central focus of the course content. The course will be particularly helpful to students planning on learning as many kanji as possible, and eventually all the 1,950 “Kanji for Common Use.” (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
JAPN 205. Kanji III (3)
Prerequisite: JAPN 201 or equivalent. Can be taken concurrently with JAPN 202. Students learn to read and write 750 kanji, and learn to use them in context. The course will provide students with the opportunity to further their study of Japanese language and culture and to increase functional language competence. Reading comprehension and writing skills will be targeted with the use of readings, compositions, and exercises, including web-based programs and reading materials. The course will include formal study of language structure, although not as the central focus of the course content. The course will be particularly helpful to students planning on learning as many kanji as possible, and eventually all the 1,950 “Kanji for Common Use.” (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
JAPN 300. Advanced Japanese Conversation (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of 2nd year sequence in Japanese. Designed to develop further the students’ ability to express themselves in spoken Japanese. Strongly recommended for students planning to participate in study abroad programs in Japan.
JAPN 304. Advanced Grammar and Composition (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of 2nd year sequence in Japanese. Consisting of advanced studies in grammar, syntax, and kanji (Chinese characters) with composition exercises designed to develop the students’ command of the written language.
JAPN 305. Language and Culture in Japanese (3)
Prerequisite: JAPN 300 or equivalent. Practice in communication utilizing grammatical and socio-linguistic studies. Th rough video presentation, role play, interpretation exercises, and other activities, the students describe the situation, identify any problems, and practice solving problems or accomplishing goals in a non-confrontational manner appropriate in the Japanese social context.
JAPN 306. Advanced Reading and Composition (3)
Prerequisite: JAPN 304 or equivalent. Aims to increase balanced skills in reading and writing. Focuses on various aspects of Japanese society and values. Designed to develop ability to address intercultural differences and resulting problems.
JAPN 391. Language Practicum (3)
Prerequisites: JAPN 300 or instructor consent. A Language Practicum is a course in which field experience is the predominant learning mode, and it can include a community service-learning and other practical experiences in Japanese-language speaking organizations approved by the MCLL Department, such as Japanese schools, social welfare, political or other community organizations. Faculty assist students in obtaining appropriate placement. The field work shall require an extensive use of the target language and exposure to the target culture. Emphasis will be on the development of appropriate professional vocabulary as well as speaking and comprehension skills, and culturally-appropriate interaction skills. The field work is complemented by academic study and written assignments. May be repeated once. (Credit/No Credit Only)
JAPN 400. Japanese Language and Society (3)
Pre-requisite: JAPN 304 or equivalent. The goal of this course is for students to learn how the Japanese people and society are depicted in the media, and to use Japanese skills for authentic communication purposes. The course will focus on advanced grammar, idioms and reading comprehension skills enabling students to become better able to express themselves and comprehend both spoken and written Japanese. The course will cover 250 new kanji. The course will be conducted through interactive group/pair activities and discussions, as well as written and web-based assignments. Students will also engage in collaborative projects with a partner class at a Japanese university.
JAPN 401. Introduction to Literature in Japanese (3)
Pre-requisite: JAPN 400 or equivalent. In this course students read authentic work of literature, beginning with poetry, essays, and short stories. The goal of this course is for students to improve their facility to read and to recognize the subtle diff erences in the ways Japanese and Americans communicate, interact, and live their lives. This course focuses on 250 new kanji, advanced grammar, idioms and reading comprehension skills enabling students to become better able to comprehend both spoken and written Japanese and express themselves. The course is conducted through interactive group/pair activities, discussions, and written and web-based assignments, such as listening to podcast readings of a literary work.
JAPN 499A-C. Independent Study (1-3)

Korean

Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures

Course List

KOR 101. Elementary Korean I and Lab (4)
Preparatory: Instructor consent. Study of the fundamentals of Korean: alphabet and additional sounds, grammatical structure, reading, writing and practice in the spoken language. May not be challenged. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
KOR 102. Elementary Korean II and Lab (4)
Preparatory: Instructor consent. Study of the fundamentals of Korean: alphabet and additional sounds, grammatical structure, reading, writing and practice in the spoken language. May not be challenged. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
KOR 296A. Intermediate Korean I (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of Korean 102 or equivalent. In this course, the emphasis will be placed on intermediate listening, speaking reading, writing, and grammar. Using various grammatical patterns, students will learn to form compound and complex sentences. May not be challenged if principal schooling has been in Korean. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)

Persian (Farsi)

Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures

Course List

FRSI 101. Elementary Farsi I and Lab (4)
Study of the fundamentals of Farsi: grammatical structure, alphabet, writing, and practice of the spoken language. May not be challenged. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
FRSI 102. Elementary Farsi II and Lab (4)
Prerequisite: Completion of FRSI 101 or instructor consent. Continuation of the fundamentals of Farsi: grammatical structure, reading, writing, and practice of the spoken language. Discussion of Persian history and culture is integrated into the lessons. May not be challenged. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)

Russian

Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures

Minor in Russian (With Permission of Advisor)

  1. Lower Division Required Courses (14 Units)
RUSS 101 Elementary Russian I (4)
RUSS 102 Elementary Russian II (4)
RUSS 201 Intermediate Russian I (3)

Choose one course from the following:

RUSS 200 Beginning Russian Conversation (3)
RUSS 202 Intermediate Russian Reading (3)

These courses should be taken after consultation with the Advisor of the Russian program.

  1. Upper Division Required Courses (12 Units)

A total of 12 units to be completed from the following two areas according to the student’s interest and background (qualifications), and upon approval by the Russian Advisor.

Area A: Language

RUSS 308 Translating and Interpreting (3)
RUSS 310 Advanced Composition and Conversation (3)
RUSS 407 Advanced Commercial Correspondence (3)

Area B: Literature and Culture

RUSS 380 Russian Civilization (3)
RUSS 390 Russian Folklore: Slavic Myths and Traditions (3)
FLIT 485 Masterpieces of Russian Literature (3)
Total Units in the Minor 26

Course List

RUSS 101. Elementary Russian I and Lab (4)
Not open to students who have attended schools where Russian was the language of instruction. Study of the fundamentals of Russian: grammatical structures, reading, practice in the spoken language. May not be challenged. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
RUSS 102. Elementary Russian II and Lab (4)
Prerequisite: Completion of RUSS 101 or equivalent. Not open to students who have attended schools where Russian was the language of instruction. Continuation of the study of the fundamentals of Russian: grammatical structures, reading, practice in the spoken language. May not be challenged. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
RUSS 200. Beginning Russian Conversation (3)
Prerequisite: RUSS 102 or instructor consent. Not open to students who have attended schools where Russian was the language of instruction. Designed to develop the aural-oral skills of students of Russian and to improve their fl uency in spoken Russian. May not be challenged. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
RUSS 201. Intermediate Russian (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of RUSS 102. Brief review of grammar and study of more advanced grammatical concepts. Introduction to the reading of literature. May not be challenged if principal schooling has been in Russian. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
RUSS 202. Intermediate Russian Reading (3)
Prerequisite: RUSS 201. Continuation of study of fundamentals; introduction to Russian literature. May not be challenged if principal schooling has been in Russian. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
RUSS 310. Composition and Conversation I (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of lower division courses or instructor consent. Development of an active use of oral and written Russian.
RUSS 380. Russian Civilization (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement or instructor consent. Study of the background of the salient features and institutions of contemporary Russian society.
RUSS 407. Advanced Commercial Correspondence (3)
Prerequisite: RUSS 307. Builds on the skills acquired in RUSS 307 and enables students to conduct business correspondence in Russian on a professional level.
RUSS 496A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in Russian Literature (3)
Selected topics in Russian literature with course content to be determined.
RUSS 499A-C. Independent Study (1-3)

Spanish

Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures

Chair
Brian Castronovo
Undergraduate Advisors
Brian Castronovo, Edith Dimo, Sirena Pellarolo, Adrian Perez-Boluda, Elias Ramos
Graduate Advisor
Edith Dimo

Programs

Undergraduate:

B.A., Spanish
Language and Culture Option
Literature Option

Minors:

  • General Minor
  • Minor for Business Majors
  • Minor for the Health Sciences
  • Interdisciplinary Minor: Spanish-Language Journalism
Graduate Degrees Offered:
  • M.A., Spanish
Credential

Spanish Subject Matter Program for the Single Subject Credential(Language and Culture Option)

Major in Spanish

The Spanish major - consisting of two options, I. Literature and II. Language and Culture - is designed for students who wish to prepare for a career in secondary, college, or university teaching, or who intend to pursue other careers where a strong background in Spanish is essential. Students should seek advisement from Spanish faculty advisors concerning the option best suited to their goals.

Note that the Spanish major requires a capstone paper to be written in a 500-level course of student’s choice.

Students with some knowledge of Spanish wishing to take lower division courses should take the Spanish placement exam before registration. The exam is available on a drop-in basis at certain hours or by appointment in the Barbara Ann Ward Language Center (BAWLC), JR 316.

Students with advanced placement cannot receive credit for courses below the level at which they are enrolled. However, 200-level classes may be waived or replaced by appropriate classes. Please consult an advisor.

Student Learning Outcomes of the Undergraduate Program

  1. Prepare students for careers in teaching (secondary, community college, university), among others in legal, medical, administrative, and journalistic fields, etc. that require advanced level (ACTFL Guidelines) abilities in both oral and written skills.
  2. Provide students with techniques, strategies, methodologies, and skills to carry out independent research that would support career choices.
  3. Establish a solid foundation for lifelong learning, service, and participation in the Hispanic, Latino and global communities. Upon completion of the program, students will be able to:
  4. Carry out research and apply critical theories in analysis of Hispanic linguistics, literatures, civilizations, and cultures.
  5. Communicate at the advanced level using a variety of rhetorical modes in both oral and written discourse.
  6. Achieve subject matter competency (as stated in the Standards of the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing) to enter a credential or a graduate program in Spanish at any U.S. university.

Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts Degree

A. Option I: Literature

  1. Lower Division Required Courses (15 Units)

Choose one from the following:

SPAN 210A/L Communicating in Spanish and Lab (2/1)
or SPAN 210B Intermediate Spanish Conversation (3)
SPAN 220A Intermediate Spanish I (3)
SPAN 220B Intermediate Spanish II (3)
FLIT 295A Masterpieces of European Literature I (3)
FLIT 295B Masterpieces of European Literature II (3)
  1. Upper Division Required Courses (33 Units)
Writing (3 units)
SPAN 306 Advanced Composition (3)
Literary Analysis (3 units)
SPAN 307 Introduction to the Analysis of Hispanic Literature (3)
Literature (9 units)

Choose three from the following:

SPAN 315A Literature of Spain I (3)
SPAN 315B Literature of Spain II (3)
SPAN 363 Literature of Latin America I (3)
SPAN 364 Literature of Latin America II (3)
Civilization and Culture (3 units)

Choose one from the following:

SPAN 380 Latin American Civilization (3)
SPAN 381 Spanish Civilization (3)
SPAN 382 Literature and Society in Latin America (3)
SPAN 383 Literature and Society in Spain (3)
Language and Linguistics (3 units)

Choose one from the following:

SPAN 395 Spanish Phonetics (3)
SPAN 401 Language and Culture (3)
Electives (12 units)

Select 3 courses from the following. Choose courses to assure a balance between peninsular and Latin American.

SPAN 508 Literature of the Middle Ages (3)
SPAN 509 Literature of the Renaissance (3)
SPAN 512 Golden Age Prose (3)
SPAN 513 Golden Age Poetry (3)
SPAN 518 Spanish Neoclassicism, Romanticism (3)
SPAN 519 Spanish Realism and Naturalism (3)
SPAN 520 Latin American Cinema and Literature (3)
SPAN 421 or 521 Central American Literature (3)*
SPAN 550 Latin American Novel (3)
SPAN 560 Latin American Women Writers (3)
SPAN 561 Spanish Women Writers (3)
SPAN 580 Spanish Literature from 1898 to 1936 (3)
SPAN 581 Spanish Literature Since 1936 (3)
SPAN 584 The Novel of the Mexican Revolution (3)
SPAN 587 The Contemporary Mexican Novel (3)
SPAN 595A-Z Experimental Topics in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures. (3)

*Spanish majors should take SPAN 521

  1. Select one course from the following with prior advisement (3 units): Foreign Literature in Translation (FLIT) 341, 423, 424, 427, 440, 480, 485, 488, 496A-Z, or Classics 315.

B. Option II: Language And Culture

This is the option with same requirements for the Single Subject Credential.

  1. Lower Division Required Courses (9 Units)
SPAN 210A/L Communicating in Spanish and Lab (2/1) or
SPAN 210B Intermediate Spanish Conversation (3)
SPAN 220A Intermediate Spanish I (3)
SPAN 220B Intermediate Spanish II (3)
  1. Upper Division Required Courses (39 Units)

A. Language Proficiency Development (9 units)

SPAN 304 Advanced Grammar and Composition (3)
SPAN 306 Advanced Composition (3)

Choose one from the following:

SPAN 300 Advanced Conversational Spanish (3)
SPAN 310 Language and Contemporary Hispanic Life (3)

B. Language and Linguistic Analysis (9 units)

SPAN 395 Spanish Phonetics (3)
SPAN 401 Language and Culture (3)

Choose one from the following:

SPAN 400 Structure of the Spanish Language (3)
SPAN 497 Comparative Structure of Spanish and English (3)

C. Literature and Literary Aspects of Culture (15 units)

SPAN 307 Introduction to the Analysis of Hispanic Literature (3)

Choose one from Group A and one from Group B:

Group A
SPAN 315A Literature of Spain I (3)
SPAN 315B Literature of Spain II (3)
Group B
SPAN 363 Literature of Latin America I (3)
SPAN 364 Literature of Latin America II (3)

Choose one course from the following:

SPAN 508 Literature of the Middle Ages (3)
SPAN 509 Literature of the Renaissance (3)
SPAN 512 Golden Age Prose (3)
SPAN 513 Golden Age Poetry (3)
SPAN 518 Spanish Neoclassicism and Romanticism (3)
SPAN 519 Spanish Realism and Naturalism (3)
SPAN 561 Spanish Women Writers (3)
SPAN 580 Spanish Literature from 1898 to 1936 (3)
SPAN 581 Spanish Literature Since 1936 (3)
SPAN 595A-Z Experimental Topics in Hispanic Literature and Culture (3)

Choose one course from the following:

SPAN 520 Latin American Cinema and Literature (3)
SPAN 421 or 521 Central American Literature (3)*

*Spanish majors should take SPAN 521

SPAN 550 Latin American Novel (3)
SPAN 560 Latin American Women Writers (3)
SPAN 584 Novel of the Mexican Revolution (3)
SPAN 587 The Contemporary Mexican Novel (3)

D. Civilization and Culture (6 units)

Choose one from Group A and one from Group B

Group A
SPAN 380 Latin American Civilization (3)
SPAN 382 Literature and Society in Latin America (3)
Group B
SPAN 381 Spanish Civilization (3)
SPAN 383 Literature and Society in Spain (3)
Total Units in the Major 48
General Education Units 48
Additional Units 24
Total Units Required for Major 120
Minors In Spanish

(General Minor or Minor in Spanish for Business Majors or for Health Sciences)

A. General Minor

  1. Lower Division Required Courses (9 Units)
SPAN 220A Intermediate Spanish I (3)
SPAN 220B Intermediate Spanish II (3)

Choose one from the following:

SPAN 210A/L Communicating in Spanish and Lab (2/1)
SPAN 210B Intermediate Spanish Conversation (3)
  1. Upper Division Required Courses (15 Units)

a. Language (6 units)

SPAN 306 Advanced Composition (3)
SPAN 401 Language and Culture (3)

b. Literature (6 units)

Choose one from the following:

SPAN 315A The Literature of Spain I (3)
SPAN 315B The Literature of Spain II (3)

Choose one of the following:

SPAN 363 The Literature of Latin America I (3)
SPAN 364 The Literature of Latin America II (3)

c. Linguistics (3 units)

Choose one from the following:

SPAN 395 Spanish Phonetics (3)
SPAN 400 Structure of the Spanish Language (3)
Total Units in the General Minor 24

B. Minor In Spanish for Business Majors

  1. Lower Division Required Courses (9 Units)
SPAN 220A Intermediate Spanish I (3)
SPAN 220B Intermediate Spanish II (3)*

*SPAN 211, when offered, should be taken in lieu of SPAN 220B.

Choose one from the following:

SPAN 210A/L Communicating in Spanish and Lab (2/1)
SPAN 210B Intermediate Spanish Conversation (3)
  1. Upper Division Required Courses (15 Units)

a. Language and Culture (9 units)

SPAN 300 Advanced Conversational Spanish (for nonnatives only) (3)
SPAN 306 Advanced Composition (3)
SPAN 310 Language and Contemporary Hispanic Life (3)

b. Spanish for Business (6 units)

SPAN 312 Readings in Spanish for Business (3)
SPAN 313 Beginning Commercial Correspondence (3)

Students with advanced placement, or native speakers who are not permitted to take SPAN 300, must include an additional upper division course chosen with the approval of an advisor.

Total Units in the Spanish Minor 24

C. Minor in Spanish for the Health Sciences

  1. Lower Division Required Courses (9 Units)
SPAN 220A Intermediate Spanish I (3)
SPAN 220B Intermediate Spanish II (3)

Choose one from the following:

SPAN 210A/L Communicating in Spanish and Lab (2/1)
SPAN 210B Intermediate Spanish Conversation (3)
  1. Upper Division Required Courses (15 Units)

a. Language (9 units)

SPAN 300 Advanced Conversational Spanish (for nonnatives only) (3)
SPAN 303 Practical Spanish for Health Professionals (3)
SPAN 306 Advanced Composition (3)

b. Culture (3 units)

SPAN 310 Language and Contemporary Hispanic Life (3)

c. Medical Practicum (3 units)

SPAN 391 Medical Practicum: Interpreting for the Spanish Speaking (3)
Total Units in the Spanish for Health Sciences Minor 24

Requirements for the Spanish Subject Matter Program for the Single Subject Credential:

Same As Those for the Language And Culture Option.

Additional Requirements for the Spanish Subject Matter Program

  1. Exit Interview with Department faculty
  2. Overall GPA of 2.75
  3. GPA in Spanish Subject Matter Program of 2.6

For details on the Single Subject Credential program, see the Credentials and Department of Secondary Education sections in this catalog.

Master of Arts Degree in Spanish

A. Major Goals and Objectives

  1. 1. Prepare students to participate in a wide variety of careers (legal, medical, diplomatic, business, teaching, administrative, translation) that require native or near native abilities in oral and written skills.
  2. 2. Provide students with techniques, methods, strategies, and skills to carry out independent research that would support career choices.
  3. 3. Establish a solid foundation for life long learning and community service in the Hispanic communities.
  4. 4. Design, organize, and successfully deliver advanced level seminars that demonstrate superior level oral proficiency, as well as teaching methodologies.

Requirements for the Master of Arts Degree

A. Admission to the Program:

Department evaluation and approval by a graduate advisor are required before a student can be admitted to either classified or unclassified graduate standing. Please see additional information regarding classified status in the Graduate Section. Admission requirements for classified graduate status in the Spanish program are the same as the general University requirements for classified status.

B. Special Requirements

Second foreign language. Candidates are expected to have reading competence in a second foreign language other than English. The second foreign language is to be selected with the approval of the graduate advisor. See Foreign Language Reading Examination. Successful Completion of a comprehensive examination. See SPAN 697.

  1. Required Courses (18 Units)

Choose a total of six courses (at least one in each field):

a. Language

SPAN 600 History of the Spanish Language (3)
SPAN 603 Seminar in Romance Linguistics (3)
SPAN 605 Advanced Translation (3)

b. Literature

SPAN 606 Seminar in a Genre (3)
SPAN 607 Seminar in a Literary Period (3)
SPAN 608 Seminar in Selected Authors (3)
SPAN 609 Seminar in Style (3)
SPAN 620 Spanish Literary Criticism (3)

c. Civilization

SPAN 680 Topics in Latin-American Culture (3)
SPAN 681 Topics in Spanish Culture (3)
  1. Electives (12 Units)

Select at least two courses from each group:

a. Language

SPAN 400 Structure of the Spanish Language (3)
SPAN 505 Art of Translation (3)
SPAN 506 Advanced Written Expression (3)

b. Literature

Any 400 or 500-level literature courses not used to satisfy B.A. requirements, or any 600-level literature courses listed in the Core, but not used to satisfy Core requirements.

Total Units Required for the M.A. Degree 30

Course List

SPAN 101. Elementary Spanish I and Lab (4)
Not open to students with oral profi ciency or who have attended schools where Spanish was the language of instruction. May not be challenged. Study of the fundamentals of Spanish: grammatical structures, reading, practice in the spoken language. Credit will not be given for both SPAN 101 and 103. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
SPAN 102. Elementary Spanish II and Lab (4)
Prerequisite: Completion of SPAN 101 or instructor consent. Not open to students who have attended schools where Spanish was the language of instruction. Continuation of the study of the fundamentals of Spanish grammatical structures, reading, practice in the spoken language. May not be challenged. Credit will not be given for both SPAN 102 and 104. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
SPAN 103. Elementary Written Spanish I (3)
Preparatory: Instructor consent, subject to verification of oral skills at the beginning of the semester. Open only to those with oral fluency in Spanish. May not be challenged. Emphasizes the development of reading and writing skills and includes the study of specific areas of grammar. Reading selections emphasize Hispanic culture. Taught in Spanish. Credit will not be given for both SPAN 101 and 103. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
SPAN 106CLD. Elementary Spanish II CLAD (2)
Prerequisite: SPAN 101. Supplements SPAN 101 and allows students to satisfy the 6-unit language requirement of the CLAD portion of the Teaching Credential Program. Enables future teachers to improve their Spanish and to provide them with the skills to express themselves on a daily basis in their classrooms.
SPAN 210A/L. Communicating in Spanish and Lab (2/1)
Prerequisite: Completion of SPAN 102 or 104 or equivalent. Corequisite: SPAN 210AL (1-unit conversational module emphasizing the development of oral skills). Not open to students who have attended schools where Spanish was the language of instruction. Situational Spanish for intercultural communication. Development of listening and speaking skills in the context of world-wide Hispanic cultures. Reading and writing activities in addition to lab requirement. Recommended for students wanting to strengthen Spanish skills before entering other 200-level courses, or for those primarily interested in developing practical communicative ability. May not be challenged. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
SPAN 210B. Intermediate Spanish Conversation (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of SPAN 102 or 104 or equivalent. Recommended Corequisites: SPAN 220A and 220B. Not open to students who have attended schools where Spanish was the language of instruction. Intended to develop the students’ oral-aural skills and to improve their fluency in spoken Spanish. May not be challenged. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
SPAN 211. Intermediate Readings in Business Spanish (3)
A course in intermediate Spanish reading, focusing on aspects of business. Does not count toward the major or minor in Spanish.
SPAN 220A. Intermediate Spanish I (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of SPAN 102 or 104 or equivalent. Recommended Corequisite: SPAN 210B. Improves listening and speaking skills, although reading and writing skills are strengthened as necessary. Review of basic grammar and introduction of more advanced grammatical structures and syntax. Vocabulary expansion. May not be challenged if principal schooling has been in Spanish. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
SPAN 220B. Intermediate Spanish II (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of SPAN 220A or equivalent. Recommended Corequisite: SPAN 210B. Improves reading and writing skills in Spanish and use of these skills in the context of an introductory study of Hispanic literature. Introduces critical theory as an essential to analysis. Reviews application of grammar skills to composition. Conducted in Spanish. May not be challenged if principal schooling has been in Spanish. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
SPAN 300. Advanced Conversational Spanish (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of SPAN 220A or equivalent. Recommended Corequisite: SPAN 220B. Not open to students who have attended schools where Spanish was the language of instruction. Encourages majors and minors in Spanish engaged in the Junior Year Program to further develop their ability to express themselves in the Spanish language. Strongly recommended for prospective teachers of Spanish. May not be challenged.
SPAN 304. Advanced Grammar and Composition (3)
Prerequisite: Upper Division standing in Spanish. One-semester course consisting of the study of diffi cult problems of syntax peculiar to the Spanish language, with composition exercises that develop students’ command of the written language.
SPAN 306. Advanced Composition (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of SPAN 304 or upper division standing in Spanish. Analysis and evaluation of types of Spanish style and the practical application of these type patterns in writing.
SPAN 307. Introduction to the Analysis of Hispanic Literature (3)
Prerequisites: Completion of SPAN 220B or equivalent. Reading, discussion, and practical analysis of selected works of Hispanic literature to acquire the basic knowledge of the genres, archetypes, and movements which are unique to it. Introduction to the analytical tools (terminology, critical approaches, research methodology, and term paper format) necessary to the study of the above. Conducted in Spanish.
SPAN 310. Language and Contemporary Hispanic Life (3)
Prerequisite: Upper Division standing in Spanish. Advanced conversation focused on aspects of contemporary culture.
SPAN 312. Readings in Spanish for Business (3)
Prerequisite: SPAN 306. Readings and discussion of texts dealing with various aspects of business that introduce students to the basic vocabulary and structures of commercial Spanish.
SPAN 315A. Literature of Spain I (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of SPAN 306 and 307. Introduction to the highlights of Spanish literature from its origins to the Golden Age period, including Cervantes.
SPAN 315B. Literature of Spain II (3)
Prerequisite: SPAN 306 and 307. Introduction to the highlights of Spanish literature from the Golden Age period to the modern period.
SPAN 320A. Culture and Civilization in Contemporary Hispanic Society (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of SPAN 220B or equivalent. Not open to majors or minors. For the Liberal Studies Program concentration. Develops the formal writing skills needed in the preparation of essays and research papers. Readings upon which the writing exercises based discuss Hispanic (European as well as Latin American) culture and civilization from the mid-19th century to the present. Conducted in Spanish.
SPAN 320B. Literature and Culture in Contemporary Hispanic Society (3)
Prerequisite: SPAN 320A. Not open to majors or minors. For the Liberal Studies Program concentration. Reading and discussion of selected literary works with emphasis on their place in the development of Spanish and Spanish-American literature and their relationship to social and historical movements, the history of ideas and the development of the arts from the mid 19th century to the present. Conducted in Spanish.
SPAN 363. Literature of Latin America I (3)
Prerequisites: SPAN 306; 307. First part of a 2-semester course dealing with representative authors of Central and South America; study of the cultural and social backgrounds of their work; analysis of literary genres, such as native Indian elements and gauchesco literature.
SPAN 364. Literature of Latin America II (3)
Prerequisites: SPAN 306; 307. Second part of a 2-semester course dealing with representative authors of Central and South America; study of the cultural and social backgrounds of their work; analysis of literary genres, such as native Indian elements and gauchesco literature.
SPAN 380. Latin American Civilization (3)
Prerequisite: Upper Division standing in Spanish. Evolution of Latin American civilization, with special reference to social, cultural, and artistic elements.
SPAN 381. Spanish Civilization (3)
Prerequisite: Upper Division standing in Spanish. Study of Spanish customs and institutions in the light of their historical development.
SPAN 382. Literature and Society in Latin America (3)
Prerequisite: Upper Division standing in Spanish. Reading and discussion of selected works of fiction and non-fiction with emphasis on their place in the development of Latin American literature and their relationship to social and historical movements, the history of ideas and the development of the arts. Conducted in Spanish.
SPAN 383. Literature and Society in Spain (3)
Prerequisite: Upper Division standing in Spanish. Reading and discussion of selected works of fiction and non-fiction with emphasis on their relationships to social and historical movements, the history of ideas and the development of the arts in Spain. Conducted in Spanish.
SPAN 395. Spanish Phonetics (3)
Prerequisite: Upper Division standing in Spanish. Improves pronunciation and consolidates and supplements basic theoretical knowledge about sounds, sound relationships, and sentence inflection.
SPAN 400. Structure of the Spanish Language (3)
Prerequisite: Upper Division standing in Spanish. Scientific analysis of the structure of Spanish; comparison with traditional descriptions; review of problems of usage in writing and speaking Spanish.
SPAN 401. Language and Culture (3)
Prerequisite: Upper Division standing in Spanish. Linguistic study of the Spanish language in a social and cultural context. Topics covered may include the study of cultural infl uences on the development of the language and its varieties, languages in contact with other languages, bilingualism, and socio-cultural factors in language use.
SPAN 421. Central American Literature (3)
Prerequisites: SPAN 306; 307 for Spanish Majors; CAS 201; upper division standing for CAS Minors or instructor consent. Recommended Corequisite: SPAN 521. Examines Central American literary traditions with emphasis on the 20th Century. Focuses on the aesthetic proposals, the historical and political context in which Central American literature is produced, the Central American transnational experience, and the ways in which literary production contributes to the construction of a contemporary version of Central American identity. Emphasizes application of recent trends in literary theories and critical methodologies. Variable topics. Conducted in Spanish.
SPAN 496A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in Spanish Literature (3)
Prerequisites: SPAN 306; 307. Selected topics in Spanish literature or linguistics with course content to be determined.
SPAN 497. Comparative Structure of Spanish and English (3)
Prerequisite: SPAN 395. Recommended for native speakers. Comparative study of the Spanish and English linguistic structures at the phonemic, morphemic, syntactic, and semantic levels as they interact in the bilingual learning process.
SPAN 499A-C. Independent Study (1-3)

Graduate

All graduate level classes are conducted in Spanish. For ways to meet the foreign language graduate reading requirement, see Foreign Language Reading Examination.

SPAN 505. The Art of Translation (3)
Prerequisite: SPAN 306 or instructor consent. Study of the morphemic, syntactic, and semantic problems of translating Spanish into English and vice versa, complemented by practical work in both areas. Conducted in Spanish.
SPAN 506. Advanced Written Expression (3)
Prerequisite: SPAN 306 or instructor consent. Advanced expository writing designed to take the student beyond the basic skills of clarity and organization to improved language mastery and use of stylistic modes. Conducted in Spanish.
SPAN 508. Literature of the Middle Ages (3)
Prerequisites: SPAN 306; 307. Study of the literary and intellectual developments in Spain during the Middle Ages. Conducted in Spanish.
SPAN 509. Literature of the Renaissance (3)
Prerequisites: SPAN 306; 307. Study of the literary and intellectual developments in Spain during the Renaissance. Analysis of the development of major genres. Conducted in Spanish.
SPAN 512. Golden Age Prose (3)
Prerequisites: SPAN 306; 307. Study of the major trends in the prose literature of the Golden Age; Cervantes and the novel, mystic prose, the essay, and historiography. Conducted in Spanish.
SPAN 513. Golden Age Poetry (3)
Prerequisites: SPAN 306; 307. Study of the principal trends and types of Golden Age poetry; epic, lyric, and drama. Conducted in Spanish.
SPAN 518. Spanish Neoclassicism and Romanticism (3)
Prerequisites: SPAN 306; 307. Study of the aesthetic, social, and philosophical ideas in the writings of major Spanish Neoclassic and Romantic figures. Conducted in Spanish.
SPAN 519. Spanish Realism and Naturalism (3)
Prerequisites: SPAN 306; 307. Study of the major Realistic and Naturalistic authors. Analysis of the development of aesthetic theory and the infl uence of growing social consciousness and scientific theory on literature. Conducted in Spanish.
SPAN 520. Latin American Cinema and Literatures (3)
Prerequisites: SPAN 306; 307. Studies the relationship between film and literature in Latin America, focusing on cinematic adaptations of literary works. Films are viewed by the students outside of the classroom. Class time is almost entirely devoted to discussion of readings and films. Conducted in Spanish.
SPAN 521. Central American Literature (3)
Prerequisites: SPAN 306; 307. Recommended Corequisite: SPAN 421. Examines Central American literary traditions with emphasis on the 20th Century. Focuses on the aesthetic proposals, the historical and political context in which Central American literature is produced, the Central American transnational experience, and the ways in which literary production contributes to the construction of a contemporary version of Central American identity. Application of recent trends in literary theories and critical methodologies are emphasized. Variable topics. Conducted in Spanish.
SPAN 530. Spanish Dialectology (3)
Prerequisite: SPAN 395; 400. Study of the objective, methods and issues involved in Spanish Dialectology. Exploration of major differences between Iberian and Latin American Spanish, and in depth analysis of phonetic, morphosyntactic, and lexical characteristics of regional and national varieties, including the Spanish of the United States. Students conduct a research project that includes a small-scale linguistic survey involving native speakers of such dialects. Relevant findings reported through oral presentations and a research paper. Conducted in Spanish.
SPAN 550. The Latin American Novel (3)
Prerequisites: SPAN 306; 307. Development of the Latin American novel from the colonial period to the present day. Emphasis on the “Nueva Novela’’ (Fuentes, García Márquez, Rulfo, Roa Bastos, Sabato, Vargas Llosâ, etc.) Conducted in Spanish.
SPAN 560. Latin American Women Writers (3)
Prerequisites: SPAN 306; 307. Topical study of selected works of Latin American women writers, exploring women’s’ literary traditions and their relationships to mainstream literary movements. Application of recent trends in literary theories and critical methodologies are emphasized. Conducted in Spanish.
SPAN 561. Spanish Women Writers (3)
Prerequisites: SPAN 306; 307. Topical study of selected works of Spanish women writers, exploring women’s literary traditions and their relationship to mainstream literary movements. Application of recent trends in literary theories and critical methodologies are emphasized. Conducted in Spanish.
SPAN 580. Spanish Literature from 1898 to 1936 (3)
Prerequisites: SPAN 306; 307. Study of social, philosophical, and aesthetic issues as reflected in Spanish literature from 1898 to 1936. Conducted in Spanish.
SPAN 581. Spanish Literature Since 1936 (3)
Prerequisites: SPAN 306; 307. Study of the major works of Spanish literature from 1936 to the present, including those of writers exiled during the Spanish Civil War (1936-39). All works are studied within the framework of life in Spain during and after the Civil War and in relation to the Spanish literary tradition. Conducted in Spanish.
SPAN 584. The Novel of the Mexican Revolution (3)
Prerequisites: SPAN 306; 307. Study of selected novels which describe the revolutionary struggle during the years 1910-1915 and the profound changes which the revolution produced in Mexican society. Also emphasizes the novelists’ disillusion with many of the revolutionary governments. Conducted in Spanish. (Crosslisted with CHS 584)
SPAN 587. The Contemporary Mexican Novel (3)
Prerequisites: SPAN 306; 307. Study of the recent trends in the Mexican Novel through the reading of selected works by the best-known contemporary Mexican novelists. Conducted in Spanish. (Crosslisted with CHS 487)
SPAN 595A-Z Experimental Topics Courses in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures (3-3)
Prerequisites: two upper division courses in the major and senior standing. Study of experimental topics in the discipline of Hispanic Literatures and Cultures, with course content to be determined each semester. May be repeated once for credit. Conducted in Spanish.
SPAN 600. History of the Spanish Language (3)
Development of Spanish from Latin to the present. Conducted in Spanish.
SPAN 603. Seminar in Romance Linguistics (3)
Major linguistic problems with specific reference to Spanish. Conducted in Spanish.
SPAN 605. Advanced Translation (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of SPAN 505 or instructor consent. Further study of translation as it goes beyond the functional conveyance of meaning to the more complex tasks of transferring stylistic features of genre patterns. Analysis of texts already translated into English or Spanish and practice according to the students’ area of interest. Conducted in Spanish.
SPAN 606. Seminar in A Genre (3)
Topics vary from semester to semester. Conducted in Spanish.
SPAN 607. Seminar in A Literary Period (3)
Period studied varies from semester to semester. Conducted in Spanish.
SPAN 608. Seminar in Selected Authors (3)
Authors studied vary from semester to semester. Conducted in Spanish.
SPAN 609. Seminar in Style (3)
Review of principal stylistic theories and their application to Spanish. Conducted in Spanish.
SPAN 620. Spanish Literary Criticism (3)
Historical development of Spanish literary criticism; analysis of representative critics. Conducted in Spanish.
SPAN 680. Selected Topics in Latin American Culture (3)
Preparatory: Completion of SPAN 380 or its equivalent or consent of the instructor. Detailed analysis of the complex interplay of political, artistic and intellectual forces at work at any given moment in history. Period or area treated varies from semester to semester. Conducted in Spanish.
SPAN 681. Topics in Spanish Culture (3)
Preparatory: Completion of SPAN 381 or its equivalent or consent of the instructor. Detailed analysis of the complex interplay of political, artistic and intellectual forces at work at any given moment in history. Period treated varies from semester to semester. Conducted in Spanish.
SPAN 697. Directed Comprehensive Studies (3)
Required for comprehensive examinations. Taken in final semester. Conducted in Spanish.
SPAN 699A-C. Independent Study (1-6)
Conducted in Spanish.

The Certificate Program in Languages Other Than English

The Certificate Program in languages other than English prepares students for the increasingly globalized world of economic and political interdependence where language and cultural proficiency are vital. The Certificate Program consists of courses on campus and an experiential component such as study abroad or language practicum in the community. The program provides students with language skills and cultural competency that will give them a competitive edge, enable them to expand career opportunities, and enhance their personal lives in international and intercultural environments.

Requirements for the Certificate in Languages Other Than English Prerequisites

Two language courses at the elementary level (101 and 102) or equivalent.

A. Armenian Certificate Courses

Required Courses In Armenian: 15 Units

  1. 1. Lower Division: (6 Units)
ARMN 201 Intermediate Armenian I (3)
ARMN 202 Intermediate Armenian II (3)
  1. 2. Upper Division: (6 Units)

Select two courses from the following:

ARMN 310 Armenian Culture (3)
ARMN 315 Masterpieces of Armenian Literature (3)
ARMN 360 Changing Roles of Armenian Women (3)
ARMN 380 Contemporary Issues in Armenia and Diaspora (3)
ARMN 440 Armenian American Child (3)
  1. 3. Experiential Component: (3 Units)
ARMN 391 Language Practicum (3)
or other programs approved by the MCLL
B. French Certificate Courses

Required Courses In French: 15 Units

  1. 1. Lower Division: (6 Units)
FREN 200 Beginning French Conversation (3)
FREN 204 Review of French Grammar (3)
  1. 2. Upper Division: (6 Units)

Select 2 courses from the following

FREN 300 Advanced French Conversation (3)
FREN 305 French Pronunciation and Diction (3)
FREN 380 French Civilization (3)
FREN 381 The Contemporary French World (3)
  1. 3. Experiential Component: (3 Units)
FREN 391 Language Practicum (3)
or other programs approved by the MCLL
C. Italian Certificate Courses

Required Courses In Italian: 15 Units

  1. 1. Lower Division: (6 Units)
ITAL 201 Intermediate Italian I (3)
ITAL 202 Intermediate Italian II (3)
  1. 2. Upper Division: (6 Units)

Select 2 courses from the following

ITAL 300 Advanced Conversational Italian (3)
ITAL 305 Structure of the Italian Language (3)
ITAL 315 Masterpieces of Italian Literature (3)
FLIT 330 Italian Civilization from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance (3)
FLIT 371 Modern Italian Culture (3)
FLIT 381 Aspects of the Italian-American Experience in Cinema, Literature, Philosophy, and Music (3)
  1. 3. Experiential Component: (3 Units)
ITAL 391 Language Practicum (3)
or other programs approved by the MCLL
D. Japanese Certificate Courses

Required Courses In Japanese: 17 Units

  1. 1. Lower Division: (8 Units)
JAPN 201 Intermediate Japanese I (4)
JAPN 202 Intermediate Japanese II (4)
  1. 2. Upper Division: (6 Units)

Select 2 courses from the following

JAPN 300 Advanced Japanese Conversation (3)
JAPN 304 Advanced Grammar and Composition (3)
JAPN 305 Language and Culture in Japanese (3)
JAPN 306 Advanced Reading and Composition (3)
FLIT 370 Contemporary Japanese Culture (3)
JAPN 402/ FLIT 402 Japanese Literature (3)

Experiential Component: (3 Units)

JAPN 391 Language Practicum (3)
or other programs approved by the MCLL
E. Spanish Certificate Courses

Required Courses In Spanish: 15 Units

  1. 1. Lower Division: (6 Units)
SPAN 220A Intermediate Spanish I (3)
SPAN 220B Intermediate Spanish II (3)
  1. 2. Upper Division: (6 Units)

Select 2 courses from the following

SPAN 304 Advanced Grammar and Composition (3)
SPAN 306 Advanced Composition (3)
SPAN 310 Language and Contemporary Hispánic Life (3)
SPAN 380 Latin American Civilization (3)
SPAN 381 Spanish Civilization (3)
  1. 3. Experiential Component: (3 Units)
SPAN 391 Practicum in Spanish (3)
or other programs approved by the MCLL.
Lower Division 6-8
Upper Division 6 units
Required Experiential Component 3 units
Study Abroad, Language practicum, or approved experiential program.
Total Units for Certificate: 15-17