Table of Contents

Linguistics/TESL Program

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College of Humanities

Program Committee:

  • Fredric Field
  • English; Catherine Jackson
  • Communication Disorders and Sciences
  • Bessie Karras-Lazaris
  • Intensive English Program; Sharon Klein
  • English; Rebecca Litke
  • Communication Studies; Evelyn McClave
  • English; Sabrina Peck
  • Elementary Education; Ana Sánchez-Muñoz
  • Chicana/o Studies
  • Enchao Shi
  • English,

Adjunct Faculty:

  • Joseph Galasso
  • Shadi Ganjavi
  • Gayaneh Hagopian
  • Cynthia Hagstrom
  • Terrie Mathis
  • Christina M. Scholten
  • Wendy Snyder

Emeritus Faculty

  • Joanna McKenzie

Programs

Undergraduate:

  • B.A., Linguistics
  • Minor in Linguistics
  • Minor in TESL (See TESL in this Catalog)

Graduate:

  • M.A., Linguistics
  • M.A., Linguistics – TESL Option

Certificate:

  • TESL Certificate (See TESL in this Catalog)

The Major

Linguistics studies human language, seeking to define its nature, to establish its relationship to human thought, to discover what distinguishes human language from other forms of communication (human and non-human), to understand how children develop a language and acquire additional ones, to understand the ways in which languages may differ from one another, and to describe how human beings use language in context to engage in all the other “human” activities.

Presently, the Linguistics Major is, for the most part, an upper division Major. Three linguistics courses are available for GE credit at the 200 and 300 levels. Students are encouraged to complete their GE work and to pursue study in languages other than their native language in preparation for their work in Linguistics. Entering freshmen who are interested in Linguistics should consult with the Coordinator/Advisor.

Careers

The questions that linguistics teaches students to ask about language are related to a wide range of fields and professions, including law, psychology, education, computer science and technology, anthropology, and sociology, to name a few. Students who earn bachelor’s degrees in linguistics may select to prepare for and seek careers in any of these fields, or may pursue advanced degrees in linguistics and related fields.

The M.A. in Linguistics – TESL Option, the TESL minor, and the TESL Certificate prepare students - each at different levels, and with different applications - to teach English to speakers of other languages. For information on the TESL minor and the TESL Certificate, see TESL in this Catalog.

Academic Advising

Advisement is available from the Coordinator during office hours and by appointment.

Student Learning Outcomes of the Undergraduate Program

Graduates of the B.A. in Linguistics will be able to:

  • 1. Express what linguists mean by “knowing a human language” by demonstrating knowledge of such core fields as phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics.
  • 2. Verbalize what is involved in the acquisition and development of language and discuss its biological and social foundations.
  • 3. Describe key concepts from such fields as pragmatics and discourse analysis and relate them to language data.
  • 4. Verbalize how sociocultural diversity manifests itself in language using methods and concepts from the field of sociolinguistics.
  • 5. Read, evaluate, and write effectively about linguistic topics.
  • 6. Define the connections between linguistic study and its practical applications.

Student Learning Outcomes of the Graduate Program

Graduates of the M.A. in Linguistics will:

  • 1. Demonstrate a solid knowledge of the core of linguistic theory.
  • 2. Demonstrate understanding of how linguistics applies to a range of professional settings and to general issues at large.
  • 3. Demonstrate understanding of how such fundamental knowledge in core disciplines of linguistics can be applied to a range of issues such as teaching language.
  • 4. Demonstrate the ability to read, analyze and critically evaluate linguistic research and demonstrate a high level of critical thinking and problem solving.
  • 5. Demonstrate the ability to conduct original research, analyze data, and make appropriate conclusions.

Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts Degree

1. Required Courses (24 Units)

Select one of the following Introductory Linguistics courses (3 units)
  • ANTH 310 Anthropological Linguistics (3)*
  • ENGL 301 Language and Linguistics (3)
  • COMS 420 Language and Symbolic Processes (3)

*Students selecting ANTH 310 as their introductory course may apply this selection to the GE Comparative Cultural Studies requirement. They may do the same with one course in Foreign Language Study, for a total of 6 units, shared between the Major and GE.

Core courses in Linguistics (15 units)
  • LING 402 Phonetics and Phonology (3)
  • LING 404 Morphology and Syntax (3)
  • LING 408 Semantics and Pragmatics (3)
  • LING 417 Language Development and Acquisition (3)
  • LING 441 Sociolinguistics (3)
Studies in a Foreign Language (6 units)

Students should consult with the Linguistics Coordinator/Advisor concerning the completion of this requirement.

Options (A. Elective Option, B. Minor Option)

A. The Elective Track (15 Units)

In consultation with the Coordinator/Advisor, a student will select coursework from the following set. Courses in other Departments or Programs may have prerequisites. These are marked with the number “1.” Students should seek advising from the appropriate advisor in that Department as they select courses.

Approved Elective Courses (15 Units)
  • ANTH 360 Immigration and Ethnicity (3)
  • ANTH 476D Field Study: Linguistics (3)
  • ANTH 490D Seminar in Anthropology: Linguistics 1 (3)
  • CHS 433 Language Acquisition of the Chicano
  • and ESL Speakers (3)
  • CHS 482 Language of the Barrio (3)
  • CD 340 Phonetics (3)
  • CD 442 Speech Science (3)
  • CD 462 Language Disorders 1 (3)
  • COMP 310 Automata, Languages, and Computation 1 (3)
  • COMP 332 Programming Language Semantics 1 (3)
  • COMP 333 Concepts of Programming Languages 1 (3)
  • COMS 350 Nonverbal Communication (3)
  • COMS 356 Intercultural Communication (3)
  • COMS 450 Communication Research Methodology (3)
  • DEAF 484 Structure of American Sign Language 1 (3)
  • DEAF 485 Issues in American Sign Language 1 (3)
  • ENGL 400 History of the English Language (3)
  • ENGL 405 Language Differences and Language Change (3)
  • FREN 389 French Phonetics 1 (3)
  • FREN 400 Structure of the French Language 1 (3)
  • GERM 400 Structure of the German Language 1 (3)
  • ITAL 305 Structure of the Italian Language 1 (3)
  • LING 200 (How) Language Matters (3)
  • LING 250 Language(s) in California (3)
  • LING 310 Language and the Law (3)
  • LING 407 Language Varieties (3)
  • LING 427 Languages in Contact (3)
  • LING 430 Linguistic Introduction to Cognitive Science (3)
  • PAS 395 Bilingualism in the African-American Community (3)
  • PHIL 330 Philosophy of Science (3)
  • PHIL 331 Symbolic Logic II (3)
  • PHIL 445 Philosophy of Language 1 (3)
  • PHIL 495 Advanced Philosophy of Sciences (3)
  • PSY 320 Statistical Methods in Psychological Research 1 (4)
  • PSY 462 The Development of Language and Thought in the Young Child (3)
  • SOC 364 Social Statistics 1 (4)
  • SPAN 395 Spanish Phonetics 1 (3)
  • SPAN 400 Structure of the Spanish Language (3)
  • SPAN 401 Language and Culture 1 (3)
  • SPAN 497 Comparative Structure of Spanish and English 1 (3)

B. The Minor Option (18-30 Units)

In consultation with the Coordinator/Advisor, and with the selected Department or Program, a student may complement the Linguistics Core with one of the following minors or concentrations:

Approved Minors and Concentrations:

American Indian Studies, Anthropology, Armenian Studies, Asian American Studies, Central American Studies, Chicana/o Studies, Classics, Communication Disorders and Sciences, Communication Studies, Computer Science, Deaf Studies, English, Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL), French, German, Italian, Japanese, Jewish Studies, Pan African Studies, Philosophy, Psychology, Russian, Sociology, Spanish.

  • Total Units in the Major
  • 39-54
  • General Education
  • 48
  • Additional Units
  • 18-33
  • Total Units Required for a B.A. Degree
  • 120

Minor in Linguistics

Three of the twenty-one units for the Minor are shared between the Minor and GE.

1. Introduction to Linguistics (3 Units)

  • Select one of the following courses:
  • ANTH 310 Anthropological Linguistics (3)
  • ENGL 301 Language and Linguistics (3)
  • COMS 420 Language and Symbolic Processes (3)

2. Required Courses (15 Units)

  • LING 402 Phonetics and Phonology (3)
  • LING 404 Morphology and Syntax (3)
  • LING 408 Semantics and Pragmatics (3)
  • LING 417 Language Development and Acquisition (3)
  • LING 441 Sociolinguistics (3)

3. Electives (3 Units)

Select one course in consultation with the Coordinator/Advisor, from those listed in the Elective Track of the Major.

  • Total Units Required in the Minor
  • 21

Master of Arts: Linguistics/TESL Program General Admission Requirements

Students should consult with the Graduate Programs section of this Catalog for the University requirements.

Candidates must have a minimum GPA of 2.85 in the last 60 units of their BA work and satisfy the University requirements for Graduate Admission. Students who have GPA’s below 3.0 will be required to take the GRE and achieve at least one score at the 50th percentile or higher; a satisfactory GRE score must be submitted within 18 months of admission. International visa students must have a minimum TOEFL score of 563 (paper and pencil version) or 223 (CBT) or 85 (iBT).

Academic Standards

Prerequisites: Students must earn a grade of B or higher in all prerequisite courses. Students who earn a grade of B- or lower in a prerequisite course may repeat up to two such courses for grade improvement. Students will be disqualified from the program after receiving a third grade of B- or lower in prerequisite courses.

Required Courses and Electives: Students who earn a grade of C+ or lower in a single course may repeat that one course for grade improvement. Students who earn more than one grade of C+ or lower will be disqualified from the program. This rule will apply even if a student has already repeated a course for grade improvement.

Note: a student may not repeat more than a total of TWO courses for grade improvement. For example, a student who has repeated two prerequisite courses for grade improvement will be disqualified upon receiving a C+ in a required course.

Students must request approval to repeat a course using the Course Repeat Request Form from the Program Coordinator/Advisor in advance of enrolling in the course.

Requirements for the Master of Arts Degree (General Track)

Candidates completing the program leading to an M.A. in Linguistics (General Track) will have a fundamental understanding of the core areas in linguistics at an advanced level. In consultation with the Coordinator/Advisor, candidates build on the core with their own program in order to pursue more individual goals.

A. Admission with Conditionally Classified Status:

Candidates with undergraduate majors other than Linguistics may be admitted to the Linguistics Graduate Program as Conditionally Classified candidates if they meet the Linguistics Program Admission Requirements stated above. They will be expected to complete prerequisite coursework equivalent to the 18-unit core of the BA Major: ENGL 301/ANTH 310, LING 402, LING 404, LING 408, LING 417, LING 441/427.

B. Admission with Classified Status:

Candidates may be admitted to the Linguistics/TESL Graduate Program with Classified status if they have 18 or more units in BA-level linguistics courses equivalent to the CSUN core major, all units earned with a grade of “B” or higher. Additionally, Classified status requires successful completion of the UDWPE (Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam) or CSU equivalent, (b) completion of a foreign language requirement (see below), and (c) submission of a satisfactory GRE score where required. All M.A. candidates must apply for Classified Status before they complete more than 12 units above the prerequisite level.

C. Foreign Language Requirement:

M.A. candidates in Linguistics (General Track) are required to demonstrate proficiency in a non-native language. Native speakers of English may satisfy this requirement in one of three ways: (1) they may enroll for two semesters of coursework in a non-Romance language or three semesters of coursework in a Romance language AFTER initial acceptance into the program; (2) they may pass a departmental examination set by the Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures (MCLL); or (3) they may submit a transcript showing that they hold a BA with a major in a foreign language completed within the previous 5 years. Students who are non-native speakers of English are exempt from this requirement. Students who wish to demonstrate proficiency in ASL to satisfy this requirement should consult the Coordinator/Advisor. Students who choose to satisfy this requirement using coursework must earn grades of “B” or higher in each foreign language course.

D. Culminating Requirements:

M.A. candidates in Linguistics (General Track) may select to complete their degrees by taking a Comprehensive Exam or writing a Thesis. Students selecting the Comprehensive Exam will enroll in LING 697 in the semester during which they plan to take the examination. Candidates selecting the Thesis Option must meet certain eligibility requirements as detailed in a Thesis brochure obtainable from the Coordinator/Advisor. Students in the Thesis option enroll in 3 units of LING 698C with the permission of and in consultation with the Coordinator/Advisor. Thesis units may not be offered every semester.

E. Required Core Courses (9 Units)

  • LING 501 Seminar in Phonology (3)
  • LING 503 Seminar in Cognitive Linguistics (3)
  • or LING 505 Seminar in Discourse Analysis (3)
  • LING 610 Seminar in Syntax (3)

F. Electives (18-21 Units):

In consultation with the Coordinator/Advisor, candidates will select either 21 units of coursework and LING 697, Directed Comprehensive Studies (the Comprehensive Examination), or 18 units of coursework and LING 698C, the Thesis. All coursework must be from the 400-level and above, and at least 12 elective units must be selected from 500 and 600-level courses. Coursework may include LING courses or courses in other departments, in consultation with teaching faculty and with the Coordinator/ Advisor. Candidates pursuing the General Track will consult with the Coordinator/Advisor, and complete an Approved Program Form, reflecting the courses selected.

G. Unit Count for M.A. in Linguistics – General Track

Comprehensive Exam
  • Prerequisites
  • 18
  • Foreign Language
  • 6 or 9
  • Required Courses
  • 9
  • Electives
  • 21
  • Comprehensive exam
  • 3
  • Total Units
  • 57
Thesis
  • Prerequisites
  • 18
  • Foreign Languages
  • 6 or 9
  • Required Courses
  • 9
  • Electives
  • 18
  • Thesis
  • 3
  • Total Units
  • 54

Students should be aware that theses require a minimum of two semesters of work even though only three units are earned.

Requirements for the Master of Arts Degree – TESL Option

This option is for candidates preparing to teach English to speakers of other languages.

A. Admission Requirements

In addition to meeting the Linguistics Program Admission Requirements stated above, applicants without a background in linguistics will be required to take ENGL 301, Introduction to Language and Linguistics as a prerequisite during their first semester.

B. Foreign Language Requirement

Students are required to take two semesters or equivalent of a language foreign to them. This requirement may be met with coursework completed within two years of acceptance into the Program.

C. Culminating Requirements:

M.A. candidates in Linguistics – TESL Option complete their degrees by taking a Comprehensive Exam. Students will enroll in LING 697, Directed Comprehensive Studies in the semester during which they plan to take the examination.

D. Required Courses (36 units)

  • LING 402 Phonetics and Phonology
  • LING 404 Morphology and Syntax
  • LING 417 Language Development and Acquisition (or CHS 433)
  • LING 502 Seminar in Second Language Acquisition
  • LING 520 Issues in ESL Reading and Writing
  • LING 521 Issues in ESL Listening and Speaking
  • LING 525 English Structures for ESL/EFL Teaching
  • LING 530 Introduction to TESL
  • LING 555 TESL Practicum
  • LING 566 Research Methods for Applied Linguistics
  • LING 568 TESL Testing and Assessment
  • ESL Methods for specific populations (Choose one: EED 570, EED 577 or SED 525ESL/587ESL)

E. Electives (6 units) Partial List:

  • LING 501 Seminar in Phonology
  • LING 503 Seminar in Cognitive Linguistics
  • LING 505 Seminar in Discourse Analysis
  • LING 515 Survey of Applied Linguistics

For electives in other disciplines, see the advisor or the coordinator.

F. Culminating Activity (3 units)

  • Ling 697 Directed Comprehensive Studies

G. Unit Count for M.A. in Linguistics – TESL Option

  • English 301
  • 3
  • Foreign Language
  • 6
  • Required Courses
  • 36
  • Electives
  • 6
  • Comprehensive exam
  • 3
  • Total units
  • 54

Management

  • See “Business and Economics, College of” for information on the B.A. in Management.
  • CHS 346 History of Chicana/Mexicana (3)
  • CHS 365 Third World Women and the Chicana (3)
  • CHS 482 Language of the Barrio (3)
  • ENGL 405 Language Differences and Language Change (3)
  • FLIT 370 Modern Japanese Culture (3)
  • FLIT 371 Modern Italian Culture (3)
  • JS 330 Women in the Jewish Experience (3)
  • PAS 300 Contemporary Issues in the African American Community (3)
  • PAS 322 African-American Family (3)
  • RS 378 American Jewish Experience (3)
  • GWS 300 Women as Agents of Change (3)
  • GWS 350 Gender, Race, Class, and Sexuality (3)

8. Visual and Performing Arts Select one course each from:

  • ART 305 Art Today (3)
  • ART 401 Arts of Native North America (3)
  • CHS 310 Regional Music of Mexico (3)
  • MUS 310 Understanding World Cultures Through Music (3)
  • PAS 332 African-American Music (3)
  • TH 310 Theatre in Performance (3)

9. Capstone Experience

  • LRS 491 Senior Seminar in Humanities/Liberal Studies (3)

C. Area of Specialization (minimum of 21.0 units)

An area of specialization consisting of at least 21.0 units is required within the major. Students may select one of the following options:

  • 1. Option A: Complete a minor. Students must declare the minor and seek advisement in the department of the minor.

*Some minors require completion of more than 21.0 units.

  • 2. Option B: Submit an interdisciplinary specialization proposal consisting of at least 15 Upper Division units to the Liberal Studies Program for approval.

NOTE: All General Studies Option students must complete a service learning or internship component during their course of education.

  • Lower Division Requirement
  • 10-11
  • Upper Division Requirements
  • 27
  • Area of Specialization/Approved Minor
  • 21
  • Total Units Required for the Major
  • 58-60
  • General Education Units Required
  • 48
  • Additional Elective Units Required
  • 12-14
  • Total Units Required For a B.A. Degree
  • 120

Course List

LING 200. (How) Language Matters (3)
This course draws heavily from current issues in society to highlight the role of language. It explores strategies we use to construct and reflect our identities (as skaters, rappers, school girls, nerds, etc.), to form new meanings, and to accommodate popular new technologies (e.g., texting). This course also examines personal and societal perceptions and attitudes towards the language use and competence of others. Students will undertake a challenging, collaborative, hands-on analysis to appreciate (how) language matters. (Available for General Education, Arts and Humanities)
LING 250. Language(s) in California (3)
What are the languages of California? Who speaks them? What can discovering and examining the range of indigenous, diasporic, and emerging languages in California tell us about our own relationships to language and languages, individually and collectively? This course looks at these questions, investigating, through its survey of California’s languages, some fundamental linguistic and sociolinguistic ideas about language and languages. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
LING 310. Language and the Law (3)
Determining what a written text or spoken utterance exactly conveys is nowhere more important than in the area of the law where subtle differences in wording can have drastic consequences in people’s lives. This course examines how language is used and interpreted in legal settings by applying insights from the linguistic fields of semantics, pragmatics, discourse analysis and sociolinguistics. The course has lifelong relevance for every citizen, since we can expect to sign contracts, receive a jury summons or engage in many other ways with the law and legal documents. The course emphasizes active student participation and an explicit connection between theory and practice. Students will be expected to apply their acquired knowledge to practical and - wherever possible - current societal issues. (Available for General Education, Lifelong Learning)
LING 402. Phonetics and Phonology (3)
Preparatory: ANTH 310, ENGL 301 or COMS 420. Study of the physical and acoustical properties of sound in a variety of natural languages; phonological analysis and rule formation in phonological systems.
LING 404. Morphology and Syntax (3)
Preparatory: ANTH 310, ENGL 301 or COMS 420. Analysis of morphological and syntactic structures in a variety of natural languages; an examination of major grammatical theories.
LING 407. Language Varieties (3)
Preparatory: ANTH 310, ENGL 301 or COMS 420. Introduction to the study of language variation. Theoretical aspects of phonological, syntactic, and semantic variation will be considered in their geographical and social context.
LING 408. Semantics and Pragmatics (3)
Preparatory: ANTH 310, ENGL 301 or COMS 420. Linguistic study of meaning and context of discourse, and the relationship of such study to grammar.
LING 417. Language Development and Acquisition (3)
Preparatory: Upper Division standing, and an introduction to the study of language. Required for both ITEP and Linguistics/TESL students, and addresses topics linked to language arts and (T)ESL methods courses for students preparing to teach. Introduces students to the study of language development and acquisition, including such topics as approaches to the development of children’s grammars, the development of communicative competence, definitions of bi- and multi-lingualism, relationships between language development and learning to read, issues particular to the multilingual nature of California, and issues related to exceptional language development.
LING 427. Languages in Contact (3)
Preparatory: ANTH 310, ENGL 301 or COMS 420. This course examines various effects of language contact: the occurrence of lexical and grammatical borrowing, such as borrowings between English and Spanish, the emergence of pidgins and creoles and mixed languages along with the process of language attrition or death in the context of a dominant language. The course also addresses the ways in which speakers in multilingual speech communities navigate between the languages that they speak and the language planning efforts of multilingual communities that are aimed at controlling which language (variety) is used/taught in which setting such as the use of ASL versus signed English. Much of this course focuses on issues of special relevance to multilingual speech communities in the United States and on language contact effects between English and languages such as Armenian, Spanish, Russian, and Korean.
LING 430. A Linguistic Introduction to Cognitive Science (3)
Preparatory: An introduction to linguistics. Survey of the fields comprising Cognitive Science: linguistics, neurology, philosophy, and psychology. Key issues addressed include the nature of symbolic representation, the ways in which we perceive and understand “input,” the nature of “thinking,” and the role of computational models in understanding aspects of human cognition and language.
LING 441. Sociolinguistics (3)
Preparatory: ANTH 310, ENGL 301 or COMS 420. Language in society. Examines linguistic behavior patterns as determined by such factors as age, gender, class, ethnicity, sexual orientation, region, and social context.
LING 496A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses (1-3)
Preparatory: Consent of instructor and Linguistics Program Coordinator. (Experimental courses in linguistics offered in other departments are subject to approval by the Linguistics Program Coordinator)
LING 499. Independent Study (1-3)
Preparatory: Consent of instructor and Linguistics Program Coordinator.

Graduate

LING 501. Seminar in Phonology (3)
Prerequisites: LING 402 or equivalent. Current issues in phonological theory.
LING 502. Seminar in Research on Second Language Acquisition (3)
Prerequisites: LING 402, 404, or ENGL 403, or LING 417, or CHS 433. Critical historical examination of research on 2nd-language acquisition. Study of analytical approaches such as contrastive analysis, error analysis, performance analysis, and discourse analysis, showing how different approaches reflect changing conceptions of language and the nature of language learners.
LING 503. Seminar in Cognitive Linguistics (3)
Prerequisite: An introduction to linguistics and LING 402, 404, 408, and 441. Examination of recent theoretical developments in linguistics from the general perspective of cognitive science. Focus on 3 major areas: cognitive grammar, semantics and pragmatic dimensions of linguistic categorization; the interface of cognition, experience, and grammar in natural discourse.
LING 504. Seminar in Sociolinguistics of American Sign Language (3)
Prerequisites: ANTH 310, or ENGL 301 or COMS 420, LING 441, SPED 161. Examination of sociolinguistic variables in American Sign Language.
LING 505. Seminar in Discourse Analysis (3)
Prerequisites: LING 407, 408, or 441. Seminar in the theoretical and methodological aspects of Discourse Analysis in a linguistic perspective.
LING 515. Survey of Applied Linguistics (3)
Preparatory courses: Intro to Linguistics. An introduction to multiple definitions of the field of applied linguistics and insight into the ways that scholars identify and define the concerns of the discipline. Included in the course will be an introductory survey of several specific areas of study that fall under the heading of applied linguistics.
LING 520. Issues in ESL Reading and Writing (3)
Preparatory or Recommended Corequisite: LING 502. Provides students with a foundation for understanding the processes of reading and writing – as well as the relationships between them – as they are experienced by adult 2nd language learners. Topics in the area of reading include skills and strategies that contribute to the 2nd language learner’s ability to read and to comprehend a variety of texts, and curricular design. Topics in writing include aspects of the composing process specific to 2nd language students, the design of curriculum and assignments, and the effects of various types of responses to student writing.
LING 521. Issues in ESL Listening and Speaking (3)
Preparatory or Recommended Corequisite: LING 502. Provides students with a foundation for understanding the processes of listening and speaking as these are experienced by adult 2nd language learners. While the course focuses on the academic environment, it includes an examination of skills necessary for learners to comprehend a variety of speakers in a range of spoken discourse types, covering both transactional and interactional situations. Also, factors that contribute to effective participation in conversations, including fluency and pronunciation and cultural and universal rules of discourse, bringing the areas of speaking and listening together in the context of curricular design.
LING 525. English Structures for ESL/EFL Teaching (3)
Prerequisites: ENGL 301 or ANTH 310 or COMS 420, and LING 404. Provides a systematic description of the structures and usages of English grammar from the perspective of someone learning English as an additional language. Students focus on ways that such material may most effectively be presented to non-native speakers of English.
LING 530. Introduction to TESL (3)
This course prepares students for coursework offered in the M.A. in TESL Program and for careers in the TESL field. Students will learn the goals of an M.A. TESL student: acquire practical planning skills, examine the history of second and foreign language teaching, develop a basic knowledge of second language acquisition, use research tools in the library, acquire skill in observing and analyzing ESL classes, and become familiar with how to become a professional in ESL and TESL.
LING 555. ESL Classroom Practices in Post-Secondary Academic Settings (3)
Prerequisites: SED 525ESL or 587ESL or EED 570; 6 units from the following courses: LING 520, 521 and 525. Linguistics 555 is designed to provide students knowledge of issues related to the teaching of English as a second language (ESL) to non-native speakers of English in post-secondary academic settings, and also to provide students an opportunity to gain teaching experience through supervised practicum training. The focus will be either on concerns of teaching in intensive programs or in community college settings.
LING 566. Research Methods for Applied Linguistics (3)
An introduction to research in applied linguistics, including quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods research. Data collection and analysis are covered along with methods for writing research reports.
LING 568. TESL Testing and Assessment (3)
This course is intended for students interested in exploring and practicing educational assessment and pursuing a career in TESL. In this course, students will not only learn about assessment practices, but more specifically, they will become aware of the types of pre-, post-, and in-class language assessment required to run an effective English language class and/or program. Students will become aware of the various assessment tools available to them, review criteria used to choose effective exams, and practice techniques to design or select sound language tests to suit their needs and teaching circumstances.
LING 599A,B,C. Independent Study (1,2,3)
Consent of instructor and Linguistics Program Coordinator.
LING 610. Seminar in Syntax (3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 301 or equivalent. Preparatory: English 302 and LING 404. In depth study of current approaches to syntactic analysis.
LING 696A,B,C. Directed Graduate Research (1,2,3)
Consent of Linguistics Program Coordinator required.
LING 697. Directed Comprehensive Studies (3)
Consent of Linguistics Program Coordinator required. Enrollment required in the semester that the Comprehensive Examination is taken.
LING 698A,B,C. Thesis (1,2,3)
Consent of Linguistics Program Coordinator required. Maximum of six units of 696 and 698 allowed in program.
LING 699. Independent Study (1-3)
Prerequisite: Classified graduate status required; Consent of instructor and Linguistics Program Coordinator. Maximum of six units of 599 and 699 allowed in a student’s program.