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History

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College of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Staff

  • Susan Mueller
  • Kelly Winkleblack-Shea

Faculty

  • Jeffrey Auerbach
  • Susan Fitzpatrick Behrens
  • Joyce Broussard
  • Thomas Devine
  • Erik Goldner
  • Andrea Henderson
  • Richard Horowitz
  • Rachel Howes
  • Patricia Juarez-Dappe
  • Thomas Maddux
  • Miriam Neirick
  • Donal O’Sullivan
  • Clementine Oliver
  • Merry Ovnick
  • James Sefton
  • Josh Sides
  • Frank Vatai

Emeritus Faculty

  • Thomas Bader
  • Shiva Bajpai
  • John Broesamle
  • Richard Camp
  • Joseph Chen
  • Ronald Davis
  • Allen Dirrim
  • Helmut Haeussler
  • Ralph Keller
  • Paul Koistinen
  • Gloria Lothrop
  • Charles Macune
  • Gerald Meaker
  • Michael Meyer
  • Darrell Morse
  • Alexander Muller
  • Julian Nava
  • Leonard Pitt
  • Gloria Lothrop
  • Ronald Schaffer
  • Thomas Resovich
  • Morris Schonbach
  • Ezel Shaw
  • Reba Soffer
  • David Wood

Programs

Undergraduate:

  • B.A., History
  • Minor in History

Graduate:

  • M.A., History

Credential

Social Science Subject Matter Program (SSSMP) for the Single Subject Credential. Contact (818) 677-3566 or e-mail sssmp@csun.edu for information.

Department Programs

Within the general category of social sciences, the history major and minor are humanistic, international, culturally-oriented, liberal arts programs for students desiring a broad background in the ideas and institutions of the world. They emphasize the development of the student’s personal intellectual skills of critical reasoning, writing, and analysis of issues and evidence. In addition to preparing the student for graduate study in history, or for subject matter competency (prior to applying for a secondary teaching credential in the Social Sciences), the history major also serves as preparation for a variety of professions, most notably law, government service, library science, historical preservation, and archival administration. The Master’s program constitutes a terminal degree for teachers completing the fifth year requirement for a California credential, as well as preparation for the doctoral degree. In either case, superior achievement in history must be demonstrated for admission to the M.A. program. Prospective applicants should consult informational materials from the department and consult with the graduate coordinator.

The Department of History supports international education and encourages students to investigate opportunities for overseas study. Certain courses taken at CSU International Program Study Centers in foreign countries are equivalent to courses in the Department of History and may be used to fulfill some of the requirements for degree options offered by the Department and/or certain general education requirements. Students should consult the International Programs Bulletin available in the office of International and Exchange Programs, a departmental advisor, or the campus International Programs Advisor for more information.

Careers

History provides an excellent liberal arts background which prepares majors for a wide variety of careers ranging from law to business to medicine. It also provides specific training which can lead to positions in such fields as education, historic preservation, archival work, or diplomacy.

Academic Advisement

Students interested in history should consult with the Undergraduate Coordinator prior to declaring the major. All history majors and minors should seek advisement from the Undergraduate Coordinator or a faculty member specializing in their area of interest prior to registration. Credential candidates should consult with the Social Science Subject Matter Program Advisor in the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Sierra Hall 164A Telephone: (818) 677-4450, or e-mail: sssmp@csun.edu), prior to registration. During advisement for computer registration, approval is available in the Department office for all history courses requiring special permission of the instructor.

Undergraduate Advisor: Nan Yamane

General Advisement: All members of the Department.

Graduate Coordinator: Richard Horowitz

Pre-law: James Sefton

Student Learning Outcomes of the Undergraduate Program

  • Completion of the degree in History should provide the student with knowledge of the political, economic, social and intellectual development of the world’s principal civilizations, notably American (U.S.) civilization, Western civilization, and the civilization of one other area of the world. Included also are the principal personalities, events, ideas, and relationships that are the basis of historical studies, as well as a knowledge of various historical methods and historiography which will lead to a better understanding of: a) how historians approach the past; b) the value and limitations of various kinds of historical writings and c) how to explore the evolution of history as an academic discipline. Specific student learning objectives for history majors include:
  • 1. To analyze and explain problems of historical interpretation;
  • 2. To comprehend, articulate, and apply the various approaches to historical analysis;
  • 3. To learn to read and interpret historical sources critically and analytically;
  • 4. To express orally and exchange historical ideas;
  • 5. To select a research problem and search for relevant primary and secondary sources;
  • 6. To write a research essay using a scholarly format that includes footnotes and bibliography;
  • 7. To demonstrate a complex understanding of the history of the United States, Europe, and one other region or culture over a period of time;
  • 8. To understand historical subjects that transcend regional boundaries.

Requirements for the B.A. Degree In History

1. General Core Curriculum (15 Units)

Choose one course from each of the following:
  • A. HIST 110 World History to 1500 (3)
  • HIST 150 Western Civilization I (3)
  • HIST 303 Themes in Western Civilization Before 1500 (3)
  • B. HIST 111 World History since 1500 (3)
  • HIST 151 Western Civilization II (3)
  • HIST 302 Western Cultural Heritage, Modern
  • Age (3)
  • HIST 304 Themes in Western Civilization After
  • 1500 (3)
  • C. HIST 270 The United States to 1865 (3)
  • HIST 370 Problems in American History to
  • 1865 (3)
  • D. HIST 271 The United States since 1865 (3)
  • HIST 371 Problems in American History: 1865 to Present (3)
  • E. HIST 145 African Civilization to Modern Times (3)
  • HIST 161 Survey of the History of Latin
  • America (3)
  • HIST 185 Civilization of the Middle East (3)
  • HIST 191 History of Eastern Civilization I (3)
  • HIST 192 History of Eastern Civilization II (3)

2. Research Core Curriculum (9 units)

  • A. HIST 301 The Historian’s Craft: Reading, Research and Writing History (3)
  • (Must be taken in the first 75 units of the major’s college program. Grade of C or better is required for graduation)
  • B. HIST 497 A-Z Proseminar (3)
  • (Prerequisite 301; grade C or better is required for graduation)
  • C. HIST 498 Tutorial in History (3)
  • (Grade C or better is required for graduation)

3. Upper Division Curriculum (24 Units)

All units in this section must be upper division, and HIST 302, 303, 304, 370, or 371 may not be applied to satisfy these requirements. A minimum of 12 of these 24 upper division elective units must be at the 400 or 500-level.

  • A. Upper Division European History (3)
  • B. Upper Division US or Canadian History (3)
  • C. Upper Division Asia, Africa, Middle Eastern, or Latin American History (3)
  • D. 15 from other Upper Division courses (15)
  • General Education: Some Title 5 courses also apply to the major.
  • Total Units in the Major
  • 48
  • General Education Units
  • 48
  • Additional Units
  • 14-17
  • Total Units Required for a B.A. Degree
  • 120

Second Bachelor of Arts Degree in History

The second B.A. degree is available to all students. Students admitted to the program must obtain an evaluation of all previous work in history and fulfill the University guidelines that apply to those pursuing a second B.A. degree. The second B.A. is especially attractive to students with a secondary Social Science Credential from CSUN or equivalent preparation from some other institution. Students who want to obtain a second B.A. in History while simultaneously completing the Social Science Subject Matter Program (SSSMP) that is a prerequisite for the secondary teaching credential should consult with the SSSMP director. For more information see the Program’s website at sssmp@csun.edu.

Minor in History

The History minor consists of 24 units in history, no more than 12 of which may be in lower division. With an advisor, students work out a program to complement a major and fit their particular needs. Students will be able to choose a broad program that provides a background in several areas of history, or they will be able to specialize in U.S., European, African, Asian, Latin American, topical or comparative history.

Requirements for the Master of Arts Degree

A. Requirements for Admission

  • 1. A baccalaureate degree with a major or strong background in history, cumulative minimum undergraduate grade point average of 3.0, and a cumulative minimum grade point average of 3.3 in the last 60 semester (or 90 quarter) hours. Students who do not meet these criteria must demonstrate sufficient preparation or interest in history, as determined by the department’s graduate coordinator. This can be achieved by showing a minimum GPA of 3.5 in at least three history courses at the 400-600 (upper division or graduate) level, including HIST 601 (Theory and Historiography) or the equivalent and at least one course requiring a substantial research paper.
  • 2. A Graduate Record Exam score in the 50th percentile or above on any one of the three sections of the exam (verbal, quantitative, or analytical). The GRE requirement is waived for applicants whose cumulative undergraduate GPA is 3.0 or higher, or who hold a graduate degree from an accredited institution.
  • 3. Two letters of recommendation from faculty under whom the applicant worked as an undergraduate or graduate student
  • 4. One or two-page statement of purpose describing the applicant’s academic background, career goals, historical interests, and anticipated field of study.
  • 5. A writing sample such as a research paper not to exceed 25 pages in length.
  • 6. Acceptance by the History Department.

B. Requirements for the Degree

Courses: A minimum of 30 units of approved graduate work consisting of:

  • 1. HIST 601 to be taken during the first two semesters in the program.
  • 2. Seven graduate-level history courses (21 units) including at least two courses in two different geographic areas (US, Europe, Latin America, World), and at least one course in a third area. At least two of these seven courses must be 600-level research seminars.
  • 3. Two courses (6-9 units) at the 400, 500, or 600-level in history or at the 500 or 600-level in related disciplines with approval of the graduate coordinator. (HIST 497 and 498 are not acceptable).

C. Foreign Language Requirement

The History Department strongly recommends that all students learn a foreign language, especially those who are planning on pursuing a Ph.D., but leaves to the discretion of the student’s area advisor the determination of what, if any, level of competency is required in a given foreign language.

Grades

All courses taken to meet any requirements of the program must be completed with a grade of B or higher.

Areas of Study

In consultation with the graduate advisement committee, the departmental graduate coordinator, and the student’s faculty advisors, 2 areas of study are to be chosen from the following Regions and Eras: U.S. - Canada, Latin America, Western Europe, Eastern Europe, Medieval World, Ancient Mediterranean, East Asia, South Asia, Middle East, or Australia.

A special focus may serve as a possible alternative to one of the foregoing areas. Such a focus would be developed between the student and the faculty advisors and would require the advisor’s approval before it could be accepted as an area of study. The emphasis of a special focus will be on thematic, interdisciplinary, or methodological approaches. Examples of a special focus might include: the women’s movement, slavery and antislavery movements, family history, gender analysis, oral history, colonialism, postmodern culture, archival studies, etc.

Comprehensive Examination Option

A Comprehensive Examination will be taken in two areas of history selected by the student in consultation with and upon approval by the graduate advisement committee, the graduate coordinator, and area advisors. In the semester in which all coursework is completed, students may register in HIST 697 for the two written examinations that constitute the Comprehensive Examination.

Thesis Option

After 18 units of study, students who secure a sponsor may, with permission of the sponsor, apply to write a thesis in one area of study. If such a contract is approved by the departmental graduate coordinator and the graduate advisement committee, a 3-person faculty thesis committee will be established, as required by University regulations, with the sponsor as chair. Before registering in HIST 698 and commencing work on the thesis, students will be required to pass an oral examination in the thesis area of study. The examination will be administered by the thesis committee. Students in this option must also pass a written Area Proficiency Exam administered by the area advisor in the second area of study. The Thesis Option is not intended for every admitted student. It will be approved only for those students who are judged to be capable of doing original research, are adequately prepared, and have a research problem that can be completed in the allowable time.

Social Science Subject Matter Program for the Single Credential

The Social Science Subject Matter Program (SSSMP) for the Single Subject Credential is a Commission-approved set of courses designed to equip students for teaching at the secondary level in the Social Sciences. Students who successfully complete all requirements in the program will be recommended to the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CCTC) as having demonstrated competence in the relevant Social Science subject matter (history, anthropology, economics, geography, political science, and sociology). Completion of subject matter competency is one of the prerequisites for application to the Single Subject Preliminary Credential Program in the Social Sciences (Eisner School of Education). Additional information can be found under Secondary Education in this catalog.

The SSSMP is not a major program leading to a B. A. degree. It must be completed in addition to a major. Students from any CSUN-approved history or Social Science major may participate in this program.

Please consult the program’s website for information and to make an advisement appointment if necessary. (sssmp@csun.edu)

Course List

HIST 110. World History to 1500 (3)
Introduction to major developments in world history from the emergence of complex societies until 1500 c.e. Examines processes of social, cultural, political, and economic change throughout this period, and emphasizes comparisons of, and interconnections between, major world civilizations in Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas. (Available for General Education, Social Sciences)
HIST 111. World History Since 1500 (3)
An introduction to the major developments in World History from 1500 to the Present. The course examines the processes of social, cultural, economic, and political change throughout this period, and emphasizes the production of global cultures and reactions to them. (Available for General Education, Social Sciences)
HIST 145. African Civilization to Modern Times (3)
Introduction to the history of the societies of sub-Saharan Africa. (Crosslisted with PAS 171)
HIST 150. Western Civilization I (3)
Roots of modern civilization in the West as revealed by a study of significant cultures and societies of the past from the earliest times to 1500. (Available for General Education, Arts and Humanities)
HIST 151. Western Civilization II (3)
Modern civilization in the West since 1500, with emphasis upon the historical development of basic elements of culture and problems of contemporary times. (Available for General Education, Arts and Humanities)
HIST 161. Survey of the History of Latin America (3)
Study of certain aspects of the culture and society of Latin America and analysis of the relation of those aspects to the contemporary scene. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies) (IC)
HIST 185. Civilization of the Middle East (3)
Introduction to the history and culture of the Middle East from the rise of Islam in the 7th century to the present. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
HIST 191. History of Eastern Civilization I (3)
Survey of early eastern civilization from antiquity to the coming of the West.
HIST 192. History of Modern East Asia (3)
A survey of major developments in the History of East Asia from 1800 to the present. Focuses on political, economic, social and cultural transformations in China and Japan during this time period, with some attention to related developments in Korea and Vietnam. (Available for General Education: Subject Exploration, Comparative Cultural Studies) (IC)
HIST 196. Experimental Topics Courses in History (3)
Selected topics in History with course content to be determined.
HIST 197. Why History? (3)
Prerequisite: EPT score of 151 or better, or eligibility for freshman composition. Seminar which introduces the discipline of history as a craft and as one of the liberal arts and a social science. (Available for General Education, Social Sciences)
HIST 210. A History of the Jewish People (3)
Study of the Jewish people from their beginnings in the ancient Near East to the establishment of the modern state of Israel. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies. Cross-listed with JS 210)
HIST 270. The United States to 1865 (3)
Survey of the political and social development of the U.S. through the Civil War. (Meets Title 5 requirement in American History, Institutions, and Ideals.)
HIST 271. The United States Since 1865 (3)
Survey of the political and social development of the U.S. since the Civil War. (Meets Title 5 requirement in American History, Institutions, and Ideals.)
HIST 296A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in History (3)
Selected topics in History with course content to be determined.

Upper Division

Three units of appropriate lower division history are required for all upper division courses. For further information consult the course instructor.
HIST 301: The Historian’s Craft: Reading, Research, and Writing History (3)
Introduction to the search for and criticism of historical sources, the issues and controversies concerning the interpretation of these sources, “schools” of historical interpretation, organizing the materials and data of research, and the rewards and pitfalls of historical writing. Normally open only to History majors and Liberal Studies majors with a History concentration. History majors must pass this course with a grade of C or better in order to graduate.
HIST 302. Western Cultural Heritage, Modern Age (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Major records of the modern age that have affected contemporary thought, activity, and institutions. Discussion and critical writing supplemented by field trips to museums and performances, and by independent reading and class discussion of both primary and secondary literature. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies) two hours lecture and two hours field activity.
HIST 303. Themes in Western Civilization Before 1500 (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Intended to introduce upper division students to the concepts and unresolved problems that have shaped the development of Western Civilization prior to 1500. (Available for General Education, Arts and Humanities)
HIST 304. Themes in Western Civilization After 1500 (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Themes in the institutional, political, socio-economic, and cultural development of Western Civilization since 1500. (Available for General Education, Arts and Humanities)
HIST 305. Cultural History of the United States (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. American people’s evolving patterns of life in areas including religion, education, art, architecture and music, reading matter, sports, travel, family life, and, in recent times, motion pictures, radio and television. Emphasis is placed on the values and implications revealed by the range and popularity of cultural choices. (Available for General Education, Social Sciences)
HIST 341. Modern Europe Since 1815 (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Institutions, culture, and political development of Europe from the Congress of Vienna to the present day. (Credit will not be given for 341 if credit has already been received for either 446 or 447) (Available for General Education, Social Sciences)
HIST 342. The World Since 1945 (3)
This course examines the Cold War and its international aftermath, decolonization, revolutionary movements, national development across a variety of cases, and trends in the global economy. (Available for General Education, Social Sciences)
HIST 345. War in History and Film (3)
History of warfare since the Middle Ages as reflected in classic war films, literary sources, and historical documents. Discusses effects of media on perception of historical events.
HIST 349A. Women in American History Through 1848 (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Survey of women’s roles and status through 1848. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies) (IC)
HIST 349B. Women in American History Since 1848 (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Survey of women’s roles and status since 1848. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies) (IC)
HIST 350. History of Women (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Roles and contributions of women from ancient times to the present. Special emphasis is given to the development of women’s movements from the 18th century to the present. (Available for General Education, Social Sciences)
HIST 351. History of Sexual?Behavior (3)
Historical study of sexual behavior from ancient times to the present.
HIST 355. History of Slavery in the United States (3)
Origin, nature, and development of slavery in the U.S. and its effect upon American life, politics, and people. (Crosslisted with PAS 376)
HIST 356. Anti-Semitism in Europe (3)
Anti-Semitism encompasses attitudes, legal formulations, artistic references, and actions toward the Jews in the context of European history and in relationship to the evolution of Jewish identity.
HIST 357. History of the Holocaust (3)
Examination of the Jewish experience under Hitler from its historical genesis to its final catastrophe.
HIST 366. Popular Culture and Society in Latin America (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. This course will offer students the opportunity to explore and understand the complexities of Latin American societies in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries through the historical analysis of different forms of popular culture, defined broadly as those religious, artistic, athletic and political expressions arising from different segments of society (Available for General Education, Lifelong Learning credit.)
HIST 369. History of American Indians (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Interaction of White and Indian, as well as Indian and Indian, in the U.S. from colonial times to the present. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies)
HIST 370. Problems in American History to 1865 (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Exploration of the political, cultural, and social themes of U.S. history prior to the Civil War with emphasis given to examining conflicting ideas about such issues as the dynamics of colonial settlement, the origins of the Revolution, the ratification of the U.S. Constitution, the development of liberal capitalism, the nature of the American democratic political system, the impact of slavery, and the causes of the Civil War. (Meets Title 5 requirement in American History, Institutions, and Ideals.) (IC)
HIST 371. Problems in American. History: 1865 to Present (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Exploration of the political and social themes of the history of the United States with emphasis given to examining conflicting ideas about such issues as Progressivism, the New Deal, Workers in an Industrial Age. The Immigrant Experience, the United States as a World Power as well as questions of Gender, Race and Class over time, (Meets Title 5 requirement in American History, Institutions, and Ideals.) (IC)
HIST 374. Hollywood and History (3)
Explores the relationship of classic Hollywood movies to the political, social, and cultural history of 20th century America. By placing each film in its historical context and examining it as a primary source, students will learn to evaluate the extent to which American movies have expressed or challenged the dominant political themes and social and cultural values of a particular historical era.
HIST 380. Los Angeles: Past, Present, Future (3)
Multidisciplinary investigation of the Los Angeles urban area – its patterns of population and resources distribution; its historical, economic, social and cultural developments; and policies models designed to cope with its problems -and to develop its potential as an ethnically diverse metropolis on the Pacific Rim. Application of social science methodology. Series of faculty and guest speakers, weekly discussion sessions, field trips. (Available for General Education, Social Sciences) (Crosslisted with POLS and URBS 380)
HIST 396A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in History (3)
Selected topics in History with course content to be determined.
Courses Acceptable for the Master’s Degree
Note that 300-level courses in history do not carry graduate credit for a master’s in history.
HIST 401. Oral History (3)
Study of the background literature, interviewing techniques and research applications of oral history.
HIST 402. Writing Family History (3)
Application of historical research techniques to the writing of one’s own family history.
HIST 406. The Jews in the Ancient World (3)
Political and social history of the Jewish people from their nomadic beginnings to the destruction of the 2nd Temple in 70 A.D.
HIST 409A-Z. Historical Field-Study (3)
Historical study conducted off-campus at historical locations in the United States, Europe, Latin America, and Asia. This course augments previous classroom work by immersing students in the topic’s environment. Completion of lower division survey courses and History 301. Fee required.
HIST 409. History of the Jews in the Modern Era (3)
A history of the Jewish people from the 17th century until the present. Principal themes include the transformation of the traditional community, the changes in Jews’ political status, the emergence of modern anti-Semitism, and ethnic and gender distinctions within Jewry. ( Cross-listed with JS 409)
HIST 410. The Ancient Greek World (3)
Mediterranean world from the rise of Greek civilization to the conquest of Greece by Rome.
HIST 411. The Roman World (3)
Rise and decline of the Roman Republic and the western Roman Empire.
HIST 415. The Byzantine World (3)
Byzantine history and civilization from the founding of Constantinople in 324 A.D. to the Turkish conquest in 1453.
HIST 417. California for Educators (3)
Available to Liberal Studies, Pre-Credential and ITEP students. Examination of California, focusing on its political, social, and economic growth, its settlement, its population patterns, resource exploitation, and human-environment interaction. Spatial and temporal variation of these factors is emphasized. (Crosslisted with GEOG 417)
HIST 420. Medieval Europe (3)
Political and institutional history of Europe in the Middle Ages. (Credit may not be received for both 420 and 320)
HIST 424. A History of the Medieval Middle East, 600-1258 (3)
Preparatory: History 185. This course will trace the development of religion, government, culture, and society in the Middle East in the Early Islamic period (600-1258CE). This course will first focus on Islamic conceptions of religion, law, and government. It will then examine the effect that these conceptions had on the Muslim community and on the communities of conquered peoples in the Middle East during this period. Available for Graduate Credit.
HIST 425. History of the Early Modern Middle East (3)
This course will trace the history of the Early Modern Middle East from the Mongol destruction of Baghdad in 1258 to the Napoleonic invasion of Egypt in 1798. It will focus on political events, but there will be substantial discussions of cultural, economic, and social history as well. The aftermath of the Mongol invasions and the rise and development of the Gunpowder Empires including the Mamluks, Ottomans, il-Khans and Safavids will be emphasized. Special attention will be paid to the interaction of these empires and the cultures that developed under their control with each other and with non-Middle Eastern states and cultures. Recommended Preparatory Course: History 185. Available for Graduate Credit.
HIST 426 A History of the Modern Middle East 1798-1979 (3)
Preparatory: History 185. This course will trace the development of religion, government, culture and society in the Middle East in the modern period (1798-1979CE). This course is designed to be an investigation of different perspectives on the history of the Middle East from 1789, the date of Napoleon’s invasion of Egypt, until roughly the Iranian Revolution of 1979. The focus of this class will be on individual and collective reactions to the dramatic changes happening during this period. Available for Graduate Credit.
HIST 432. Urban History of the United States (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Cities, as systems of human interaction and service exchange, permit close historical analysis of historical processes and human experience. Study of selected cities, 16th century to present, as illustrations of alternative social, economic, cultural, and political patterns of cities in stages of formation; growth; response to industrialization, immigration, transportation technology and suburbanization; decay and renewal.
HIST 433. Public History (3)
Introduction to the theory, history, and practice of public history (the presentation and interpretation of history for the general public). Available for graduate credit.
HIST 434. European Colonialism (3)
Prerequisite: Upper Division standing. Examines the expansion, consolidation, management, disintegration, and consequences of the modern European empires, focusing on the ambiguities of identity produced by the encounter between European, American, African, Middle Eastern, and cultures. Topics include such cultural constructions as cannibalism, exoticism, orientalism, primitivism, racism, and tourism.
HIST 435. African History to the 19th Century (3)
History of the societies of sub-Saharan Africa from the early iron age to the 19th century.
HIST 436. African History Since the 19th Century (3)
History of the societies of sub-Saharan Africa in the 19th and 20th centuries.
HIST 438. Traditional India from Antiquity to 1526 (3)
History and culture of the Indian sub-continent from antiquity to the establishment of the Mughal empire in 1526.
HIST 439. Modern India Since 1526 (3)
Study of the evolution of Modern India and Pakistan emphasizing themes of political and economic transformation, socio-religious reformation, cultural dynamism, imperialism, nationalism, and modernism.
HIST 440. History of War in the Modern World (3)
Selected topics analyzing the interactions of warfare with social and technological changes since the 17th century.
HIST 441. History of World War II (3)
Study of World War II as a watershed experience in modern history with coverage of the European and Pacific theatres of war, diplomatic strategies, the impact of the war on the domestic scene.
HIST 444. Renaissance and Reformation (3)
Europe from the Italian Renaissance through the religious schisms of the 16th century.
HIST 445. Absolutism and Revolution (3)
Europe in the age of colonial expansion and the rise of revolutionary doctrines, through the fall of Napoleon.
HIST 446. 19th Century Europe (3)
Europe from the Congress of Vienna to the opening years of the 20th century.
HIST 447. 20th-Century Europe (3)
Europe from the onset of World War I to the present day.
HIST 449. Russia to 1917 (3)
Russian History covering the beginnings during the Kievan period and Muscovy to the establishment of the Romanov dynasty, Imperial Russia, and the October Revolution in 1917. Available for Graduate credit.
HIST 450. Russia Since 1917 (3)
Starting with the collapse of Imperial Russia and the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution, the course examines the Soviet period in Russian history, including industrialization, Stalinism, the Great Patriotic War, the USSR as a superpower, and the demise of the Soviet Union in the late 1980s. Available for Graduate credit.
HIST 452. Medieval and Early Modern Britain (3)
Analytical survey of the political, cultural, social, and religious developments and upheavals in Britain during the turbulent period from the Norman Invasion in 1066 to the Glorious Revolution in 1688.
HIST 453. Modern Britain (3)
Chronological and thematic survey of social, political, cultural, economic, and intellectual developments in Britain from 1688 to the present. From world power status to national decline, this course covers such topics as industrialization, political reform, sex and gender roles, the impact of war, and the tensions of a multi-ethnic, multi-cultural society.
HIST 454. Hitler’s Germany (3)
Study of the evolution and nature of National Socialism in Germany. Reviews the ideological foundations and traces the rise of the Nazi party and the Hitler cult in the Weimar Republic; the establishment of totalitarian power between 1933-45; the diplomatic patterns and military climax; the question of national guilt.
HIST 456. Modern France (3)
Review of French social, cultural, economic, military and political history from the fall of Napoleon to end of the Cold War. Examines in detail the social turmoil caused by France’s many revolutions and major wars during the period. Special emphasis on the effect of class and social conflict on its modern history.
HIST 457. Modern Germany (3)
German social and political development since the time of the French Revolution.
HIST 460. Origins and Consequences of the Spanish Civil War (3)
Analysis of the political, social, economic and religious conflicts engendered by Spain’s delayed modernization and their reaction to crises and failures of the 2nd Republic, the origins of the Civil War, the emergence of Spanish fascism and the character of the Franco Regime.
HIST 461. Latin America: The Colonial Period (3)
Formation of the Spanish and Portuguese empires in Latin America, tracing the development of society, government, and culture.
HIST 462. 19th Century Latin America (3)
Examination of the struggle for independence and the social, political and economic development of Latin American nations from 1810 to 1914.
HIST 463. 20th Century Latin America (3)
Study of Latin American history since 1914 with emphasis upon the impact of modernization upon the traditional order, efforts toward inter-American understanding, and greater interaction with the contemporary world.
HIST 464A. History of Argentina (3)
Examines Argentina’s past to introduce students to the historical factors that have shaped the contours of modern Argentina social, political, economic and cultural development. After looking into the colonial background, the course explores the 19th century and covers relevant topics such as caudillismo, the power struggle between Buenos Aires and the provinces, economic growth and the international economy, and cultural and social legacies from the colonial past. Last part of the course covers the 20th century including such themes as populism, labor movement, feminism, military rule, and the transition to democracy.
HIST 465. The Caribbean Area Since 1492 (3)
Changing role of the Caribbean area in the affairs of Europe, Anglo-America, and Latin America, and the development of the region as a unique political, social, and economic community.
HIST 466. Mexico (3)
Internal development of Mexico and how it has affected hemispheric and world affairs; special attention to Mexico’s interaction with the U.S.
HIST 468. Social and Intellectual History of Latin America (3)
Study of the principal elements and trends in Latin American Civilization, with emphasis upon society, the humanities, and philosophy.
HIST 469P. Pirates In the Atlantic World (3)
Pirates were real historical actors on one of the world’s most dramatic stages set against the backdrop of a waving Jolly Roger. In this course, we will explore the myths and realities of pirates in order to examine the social history of seafaring in the early modern Atlantic world. Why and how did people become pirates? Who became pirates? How did pirates really live and die? What impact did pirates have on history? Available for graduate credit with the professor’s consent.
HIST 469W. The Atlantic World (3)
This course will expose students to the integration of the peoples and regions around the Atlantic Ocean beginning with Christopher Columbus’ voyage of 1492 and ending with the global race for colonies in the mid-nineteenth century. Readings and discussions will focus on the historical process responsible for connecting the four continents surrounding the Atlantic Ocean (Europe, Africa, North and South America) through the flow of diverse peoples, goods, and ideas. Readings will encompass the three major types of Atlantic history: transnational, international, and national. Available for graduate credit.
HIST 470. The United States: The Colonial Period (3)
Origins and development of the 13 colonies, from the beginning of settlement to the end of the French and Indian War.
HIST 471. American Revolution and Constitution, 1763-1800 (3)
Development of an American nation, from the start of revolutionary activity to the end of the Federalist control.
HIST 472. The United States: The Era of Expansion, 1800-1848 (3)
Growth of the nation from the election of Jefferson through the age of Jackson, to the completion of continental expansion at the end of the Mexican War.
HIST 473A. The United States: Civil War and Reconstruction (3)
Social, economic, and political origins of sectionalism; the Civil War and its legacy to later generations.
HIST 473B. The United States, 1877-1920 (3)
Interpretive survey of the political, cultural, diplomatic, and social history of the United States during the Gilded Age and Progressive Era through World War I.
HIST 474A. The United States: 1920-1960 (3)
Interpretive survey of the political, cultural, diplomatic, and social history of the United States from the end of World War I through the election of John F. Kennedy.
HIST 474B. The United States: 1960-present (3)
Interpretive survey of the political, cultural, diplomatic, and social history of the recent and contemporary United States from the election of John F. Kennedy to the present.
HIST 475. Women in Modern United States History: 1920-present (3)
Study of the roles, status, and contributions of women in the U.S. from 1920 to the present.
HIST 476. Youth Culture in the 20th Century United States (3)
Examines the phenomenon of “youth culture” as it evolved in the United States during the 20th century. In surveying the experiences of young people from a variety of racial, economic, regional, and ethnic backgrounds, it will explore how America’s youth have helped shape both the nation’s political and popular cultures. Also focus on how adults have sought to keep various social forces from “corrupting” their children and how young people have responded to their elders’ efforts.
HIST 477. The Popular Arts and American History (3)
Explores 19th and 20th century U.S. history through the lens of the popular arts. By examining mass produced novels and illustrations, theatrical productions, movies, songs, music, and radio and television programs, the course considers the power of the popular arts to influence politics, cultural developments, social movements, and international relations. Instead of approaching these materials as idle diversions to be consumed and discarded, we consider them as works that can repay serious analysis and interpretation.
HIST 478. Economic History of the United States (3)
History of the economic growth and development of the U.S. from colonial times to the modern period, emphasizing the causes and nature of the growth and including analysis of its impact on American society.
HIST 479A. United States Economic History to 1865 (3)
Examines the growth and development of the U.S. economy from colonial times through the end of the Civil War. Among the themes to be considered are the regional variations in economic development; the emergence of a liberal capitalist economic order; the economic significance of new systems of production, transportation, banking, and communication; and the impact of economic fluctuations on individuals and groups within the nation.
HIST 479B. US Economic History Since 1865 (3)
Prerequisite: Graduate students must have professor’s consent to enroll. Recommended corequisite: ECON 300. Examines the growth and development of the U.S. economy from the end of the Civil War to the present. Among the themes to be considered are the relationship between the state and the private sector in a free market economy; the rise of big business and corporate capitalism during the Gilded Age; efforts to come to terms with the new industrial economy on the part of government, individuals, and special interest groups such as farmers, labor, and small business; the origins, effects, and economic legacy of the Great Depression and the New Deal; the impact of the Cold War on the U.S. economy; and the social and economic impact of deindustrialization and globalization. Available for graduate credit.
HIST 479L. History of American Working People (3)
A broad overview of U.S. history from the perspective of working people, the course will examine the development of working class cultures and communities; the rise and fall of craft and industrial unions; working people’s contributions to and portrayal in U.S. popular culture; the effects of the industrial revolution and, later, de-industrialization, on working men and women; working-class racism, patriotism, and religious beliefs; the relationship between labor and the state; and the experiences of working-class immigrants. May be taken for graduate credit.
HIST 481. The American West Since 1848 (3)
Settlement of the last American Frontiers, 1848-1890; and the evolution of the modern Far West as a distinctly important region during the 20th century.
HIST 482. Constitutional History of the United States to 1877 (3)
The Federal Constitution considered from the point of view of its origins and evolution to 1877.
HIST 483. Constitutional History of the United States Since 1877 (3)
The Federal Constitution and the changing nature of the Union from 1877 to the present time.
HIST 485. Diplomatic History of the United States Since 1914 (3)
Analysis of the U.S. foreign policies since 1914 with emphasis on the origins, nature and results of America’s involvement in the World Wars, the Cold War and global international affairs since the 1950’s.
HIST 485A. The United States and the Indochina Wars, 1940-1975 (3)
Analysis of the wars in Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia with emphasis on the U.S. involvement.
HIST 485B. The United States and Latin America Since 1898 (3)
Historical analysis of the U.S. involvement with Latin America since 1989 with emphasis on the origins, nature and results of the U.S. interacting with Latin American nations in the Caribbean and South America.
HIST 486A. History of Los Angeles (3)
Evolution of the metropolis of Los Angeles from pre-Spanish days to the present.
HIST 486J. History of the Jews in the United States
Prerequisite: Graduate students must have instructor’s consent to enroll. Explores the social, cultural, economic, and political history of Jewish people in the United States from the colonial era to the present, and the relevance of this history to American culture today. Available for graduate credit. (Cross-listed with JS 486J)
HIST 488. California (3)
Political, economic, social, and intellectual growth of California from Spanish times to the present, with emphasis on current characteristics and problems.
HIST 489. A History of the African-American People in the United States (3)
Examination of basic themes and issues in the history of the African-American people in the U.S. and the relevance of those themes and issues to the patterns of today.
HIST 490. Traditional China (3)
Study of Political, economic, and social history of China from antiquity to the fall of the Ming dynasty in 1644.
HIST 491A. Modern China (3)
Survey of political, economic and social history of China from the fall of the Ming dynasty in 1644 to the Republican Revolution of 1911, with special emphasis on early Manchu success, China’s response to the impact of the West, and the Manchu decline.
HIST 491B. The Rise of Communist China (3)
Historical analysis of the Chinese Communist movement from its inception to the founding of the People’s Republic of China, with special emphasis on Mao Tse-tung’s early revolutionary thought and strategy.
HIST 493: Modern Japan (3)
Analysis of domestic and international political developments and cultural evolution from the last days of feudal-ism through the modern century of the Meiji, Taisho, and Showa periods.
HIST 494SOC. Internship Program (3)
Pre-professional practicum in a history-based field, open to history major and minors with 3.0 GPA.
HIST 495. The Philosophy of History (3)
Role of selection, facts, theories, causation, explanation, science, art, and morality; and the synthetic philosophies of history from Vico to the present.
HIST 495SS. Capstone Seminar for Prospective History Teachers (3)
Prerequisite: ANTH/GEOG/PAS/POLS or SOC 396SS. Restricted to students in the Social Science Subject Matter Program. Intended as a capstone experience, this seminar will expose students to the practices of historical thinking and guide them to develop the knowledge and skills needed to convey these practices to others. It is recommended that this course be taken in the last 12 units of the Social Science Subject Matter program. Requires ten hours of field observation in secondary social studies classrooms.
HIST 496A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in History (3)
Selected topics in History with course content to be determined.
HIST 497A-Z. Proseminar (3)
General principles of historical research, with application to specific areas of history and historiography. Grade of C or better is required to receive credit for this course.
HIST 498. Tutorial in History (1-3)
Reading and discussion in a specific field or on a specific topic in a small group. May be repeated: six units maximum. Grade of C or better is required to receive credit for this course.
HIST 499A-C. Independent Study (1-3)

Graduate

Minimum prerequisite: A bachelor’s degree with superior academic performance in history. Undergraduates with exceptional promise may enroll in 500-level classes with permission of the instructor.
HIST 505. Archival Theory and Methods (3)
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. Introductory course on the essentials of archival administration. Topics include archival theory, the history of archives in the United States, the development of collecting policies, techniques for preserving historical materials, and arrangement and description of collections.
HIST 506. The Archival Profession (3)
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. Topics include management of archival programs, automated archival systems, budgeting, space facilities planning, career opportunities, grant writing and historic preservation, and fundraising.
HIST 508. Practicum in Archival Administration (3)
Prerequisite: HIST 505; Graduate standing or instructor consent. Application of the theory of archival administration, including collection, preservation, arrangement, and exhibition of historic materials. Students may complete the practicum at one of several sites, including the Urban and Old China Hands Archives at Oviatt Library, the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library, and the Natchez Mississippi Courthouse Record Project.
HIST 510. Colloquium in Greek and Hellenistic History (3)
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. Covers historiographical writings on important developments in Greek and Hellenistic history from the Bronze Age through the Persian and Peloponnesian Wars and the trial of Socrates, and concludes with a discussion of Hellenistic Greece and the influence of Greek culture in the broader Mediterranean world.
HIST 511. Colloquium in Roman History (3)
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. Directed historiographical readings and discussion focusing on Roman history from the Republic through the fall of the Empire.
HIST 530. Colloquium in Pre-Modern World History (3)
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. Examination of major issues and themes in world history from ancient times to 1500. Possible topics include religion, empire, migration, trade, and cultural contact. Readings include major scholarly works as well as primary sources in translation.
HIST 531. Colloquium in Modern World History (3)
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. Designed for students who will one day teach world history, as well as those who are interested in trans-national, trans-regional, integrative history. Provides a practical and theoretical approach to world history since 1500 by exploring the vibrant and volatile debate over “The Rise of The West.” Topics include industrialization, imperialism, global trade, environmental change, military technology, migration and slavery, and the role of culture in economic development.
HIST 541. Colloquium in Modern European History (3)
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. Survey of major historiographical debates in modern European history, including the French Revolution, the Industrial Revolution, the Rise of Bourgeois Society, Nationalism, Imperialism, and the First and Second World Wars.
HIST 545. Colloquium in the History of the Middle East (3)
Prerequisites: HIST 185. This course is an examination of major themes in Middle Eastern history from the Arab/Islamic conquest to the present. Possible topics include examinations of cultural, economic, intellectual, religious and social history. The course will underscore historiography and the effect of modern political debates on the history of the region. Readings will include major scholarly works and primary sources in translation. Recommended preparatory courses: HIST 424 and 426.
HIST 546. The Holocaust and Genocide for Educators (3)
An overview of the Holocaust and the concept of genocide, with a focus on the analysis and evaluation of varied resources for educators, including film, photographs, literature, art, music, documents, and other primary source materials. (Crosslisted with JS 546)
HIST 550. Colloquium in Environmental History (3)
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. Directed readings exploring historical relationships between human societies and the natural world from the 15th century to the present, especially in North America.
HIST 560. Colloquium in Latin American Historiography (3)
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. Introduction to selected themes of historiographical relevance in Latin American history, with particular attention to the most recent scholarship. Familiarization with the main events, issues, and subjects in the field. Surveys and samples important writings to understand both broad trends and specific developments. Exposure to Latin American history. Emphasis on critical reading, in-depth class discussions, and the ability to present written analyses of the material covered. Major themes may include: colonial economy and society, land and labor, slavery, abolition and assimilation, women and gender, international markets, and revolutions and popular rebellions.
HIST 561. Colloquium in Latin American Cultural and Intellectual History (3)
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. Exploration of the historical evolution of artistic, intellectual, and popular cultural expressions in Mexico, Central and South America, and the Caribbean. By the end of the semester, students will have achieved a critical understanding of the diversity and complexity that characterize Latin American culture. Emphasis on critical reading, in-depth class discussions, and the ability to present written analyses of the covered material. Major themes may include: native cultures, syncretism, millenarian movements, African culture, elite and “popular” cultures, mestizaje, machismo and marianismo.
HIST 562. Colloquium in Latin American Social and Economic History (3)
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. Focuses on the relationship between economic change and social structures in Mexico, Central and South America, and the Caribbean. By the end of the semester, students will have achieved an understanding of the social and economic events that combined to produce the societies and nations that constitute Latin America today. Emphasis on critical reading, in-depth class discussions, and the ability to present written analyses of the covered material. Major themes may include: pre-Colombian civilizations, slavery, Latin America and the world economy, growth and development, inequality, import substitution industrialization, neo-liberalism, and globalization.
HIST 563. Colloquium in Latin American Political, Institutional, and Military History (3)
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. Examines the historical evolution of the political and institutional structure in Mexico, Central and South America, and the Caribbean. By the end of the semester, students have achieved an understanding of the political development of the Latin American states within a broad social and economic context. Emphasis on critical reading, in-depth class discussions, and the ability to present written analyses of the covered material. Major themes may include: colonial institutions, caudillismo, oligarchic regimes, US interventions, revolution and reform, populism, armed forces in politics, dictatorships and return to democracy, and political neo-liberalism.
HIST 569. Atlantic History Readings Seminar (3)
This reading intensive course is designed to introduce graduate students to a new analytical framework. Students will study the historical processes responsible for the integration of the peoples and regions around Atlantic Ocean beginning with Christopher Columbus’ voyage of 1492 and ending with the global race for colonies in the mid-nineteenth century. There will be a diverse set of readings that focus on the transatlantic movement of peoples, goods, and ideas that connected colonial America to the wider world. Readings may vary by instructor.
HIST 570. The American Revolution (3)
This course will help students come to terms with the late eighteenth-century imperial crisis that brought about the rise of the independent United States of America. Readings and discussions will focus on the origins, progress, and results of the American Revolution. Available for graduate credit.
HIST 572. Colloquium in 19th Century U.S. History (3)
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. Examination of the major social, economic, political, and cultural themes in the United States during the 19th Century. Topics include the industrial, market, and transportation revolutions; slavery; the Civil War and its aftermath; the rise of the (urban) middle class; the frontier and territorial expansion; and the cultural life of Victorian America.
HIST 573. Colloquium in U.S. History: Gilded Age and Progressive Era (3)
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. Directed historiographical readings surveying major political, social, cultural, and economic trends in the United States from 1877 to 1929. Topics include race relations, the rise of big business, immigration, urbanization, progressivism, the emergence of an American empire, the impact of war, nativism, and gender relations.
HIST 574. Colloquium in Recent U.S. History (3)
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. Directed historiographical readings surveying major political, social, cultural, and economic trends in the United States from 1832 to the present. Topics include the Great Depression, WWII, anti-communism, the origins of the Cold War, the Civil Rights movement, student unrest, Vietnam, and the Reagan years.
HIST 575. Colloquium in the U.S. and the Cold War (3)
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. Exploration of the effects of the Cold War on American intellectual, cultural, and social life. Readings focus on the relationship between Cold War diplomacy and domestic politics; the impact of the Cold War on the everyday lives of American citizens; the Cold War’s influence on American intellectuals and intellectual life; the Cold War’s role in fostering conservative and progressive social movements; the Cold War’s effect on American popular culture; and the impact of anti-communism on American political and cultural life.
HIST 576. Colloquium in U.S. Foreign Policy and the Cold War (3)
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. Discussion of major topics in the history of the United States and the Cold War, including the origins of the Cold War, the Korean Conflict, the Cuban Missile Crisis, Détente, and the end of the Cold War, as well as prominent figures such as Stalin, Truman, Eisenhower, Nixon, Kissinger, and Reagan. Emphasis is on the reading and discussion of secondary interpretations and historiography.
HIST 577. Colloquium in U.S. Social and Intellectual History (3)
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. Directed readings focusing on selected topics in the social and intellectual history of the United States.
HIST 578. Colloquium in U.S. Economic History (3)
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. Readings in the institutions, ideas, and character of the American economy from the colonial era to the present, with special emphasis on issues of economic growth and development, class conflicts, technological innovations, and the strategies and structures of American enterprise.
HIST 579. Colloquium in U.S. Cultural History (3)
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. By examination of various aspects of 19th and 20th century U.S. cultural history, considers the ways in which different individuals and groups have exercised cultural influence in American life. Areas of focus includes the role of race, gender, region, religion, and class in shaping cultural production and an exploration of the issue of cultural power, i.e., who defines “acceptable” and “authentic” culture?
HIST 581. Colloquium in the American West (3)
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. Directed readings focusing on American expansion into the trans-Mississippi West.
HIST 583. Colloquium in U.S. Political History (3)
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. Historiographical readings focusing on major themes in U.S. political history. Possible topics include U.S. reform movements, left- and right-wing radicalism, the politics of anti-communism, and the presidency.
HIST 584. Colloquium in the U.S. in the 1980s (3)
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. Examination of major topics in United States history in the 1980s relating to the presidency of Ronald Reagan. Emphasis on reading and discussion of the available memoir literature, secondary interpretations, and historiography, and use of the exhibits, resources, and conferences held at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library in Simi Valley. Course is followed in the spring semester by HIST 674 which involves the preparation of a research paper based in part on the use of the records of the Reagan presidential library. Students wishing to take the spring seminar devote some attention to the selection of a research topic while preparing the secondary reading for the course.
HIST 585. Colloquium in U.S. Southern History (3)
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. Readings in history of the American South from the colonial era through modern times, with special emphasis on issues of regional identity, class and race relations, slavery, popular culture and regional politics, and the continuity of southern culture.
HIST 586. Colloquium in U.S. Women and Gender History (3)
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. Directed readings on selected topics in the history of women and gender in American society from colonial times to the present.
HIST 588. Colloquium in California History (3)
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. Directed readings focusing on selected topics in the history of California, from pre-European settlement to the present.
HIST 590. Colloquium in the Asian History (3)
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. Directed readings focusing on specific areas of Asia, from ancient times to the present.
HIST 595A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses (3)
HIST 596A-Z. Selected Topics (3)
HIST 601. Theory and Historiography (3)
Prerequisite: Classified standing. Sophisticated, graduate-level introduction to history as a discipline. Surveys the development of history as a discipline, examines the various genres of historical writing, explores issues and problems of historical interpretation, and considers the how historians use theoretical models from other disciplines to shape their work. Readings include seminal works by major historians.
HIST 610. Research Seminar in Ancient Greek History (3)
Prerequisite: Classified standing. Focus on ancient Greek history from Solon to Demosthenes. Topics include Athenian democracy, the Persian and Peloponnesian Wars, Sparta, social and intellectual history, Greek historians, and modern historiography.
HIST 611. Research Seminar in the Roman Republic (3)
Prerequisite: Classified standing. Research seminar focusing on the late Roman Republic from the Gracchi to the victory and consolidation of power by the emperor Augustus. Topics include the dynamics of Roman politics, the role of the intellectual, private and public life, town and country, women, the Roman mob, whether there was a revolution in Rome, and the image and reality of leading Roman political figures.
HIST 612. Research Seminar in the Roman Empire (3)
Prerequisite: Classified standing. Seminar on the Roman Empire from the Julio-Claudians to the fall of the empire in the West. Topics include social, political, and intellectual history, the rise of Christianity, the transformation of the empire, theories about the fall of Rome, and studies of individual historians of the period.
HIST 620. Research Seminar in the Middle Ages (3)
Prerequisite: Classified standing. Research seminar concentrating on selected topics in western European, Iberian, Byzantine, and/or Mediterranean history during the period between the fall of Rome and the Renaissance.
HIST 630. Research Seminar in World History (3)
Prerequisite: Classified standing. In addition to discussing the methodological issues involved in studying and researching world history, each student writes an original, primary-source based research paper on a topic in world history that is trans-national, regional, or comparative in focus.
HIST 640. Research Seminar in Early Modern European History (3)
Prerequisite: Classified standing. Research seminar concentrating on selected topics in European history from the Renaissance through the Napoleonic period.
HIST 641. Research Seminar in Modern European History (3)
Prerequisite: Classified standing. Research seminar concentrating on selected topics in European history since the French Revolution.
HIST 642. Research Seminar in Modern European Cultural and Intellectual History (3)
Prerequisite: Classified standing. Research seminar dealing with cultural and intellectual trends in Europe since the Enlightenment, set in broad historical context. After some common readings by the entire class, each student makes a presentation on a chosen topic, and writes a research paper which can be in the history of ideas, literature, the arts, or ideology in socio-political or cultural context (e.g., “The Roots of the Nazi Mind,” “Hegel and the French Revolution,” Wagner and the Anti-Semitic Imagination,” “Nietzsche and Postmodernism,” “The Spanish Civil War as a Lab of Applied Ideology,” “The Fall of the Berlin Wall: The End of History?” or “The End of Humanism in an Age of Genetic Engineering and the Internet”)
HIST 645. Research Seminar in Nazi Culture (3)
Prerequisite: Classified standing. Students write a research paper and make an oral presentation that examines Weimar Culture, especially its avant-garde expressions; Nazi ideology, organizations, and cultural policy, focusing on the arts, literature, film, the media, and education; and/or German culture in American exile. Class also considers the question of Nazi culture as reactive to modernism or as an expression of modernism or post-modernism. Students should consider the availability of primary materials in local archives such as CSUN, the Archives of American Art, LACMA, the Getty Center, The Museum of Tolerance, UCLA Film Archives, and the Library of the Academy of Motion Pictures.
HIST 646. Research Seminar in Denazification and the Legacy of the Holocaust (3)
Prerequisite: Classified standing. Research seminar focusing on the history of the Third Reich, efforts to change German culture in the wake of World War II, and the implications and memories of the Holocaust for Germany and other countries. May include a research trip to archives in Washington, DC such as the National Archives, the Library of Congress, and the National Holocaust Memorial Museum. Students who read German are guided into German records; others focus on American records relating to German topics, such as the OSS, denazification, the Nuremberg trials, and the post-war occupation (OMGUS).
HIST 660. Research Seminar in Latin American History (3)
Prerequisite: Classified standing. Research seminar concentrating on topics in the history of Mexico, Central and South America, and the Caribbean. Students will conduct an in-depth examination employing original (primary) sources on a specific problem or issue in the history of Latin America.
HIST 671. Research Seminar in Colonial American History (3)
Prerequisite: Classified standing. Research seminar concentrating on selected topics in American history prior to the American Revolution.
HIST 672. Research Seminar in Early National U.S. History (3)
Prerequisite: Classified standing. Research seminar concentrating on selected topics in American history from the Revolution to the Civil War.
HIST 673. Research Seminar in the Civil War and Reconstruction (3)
Prerequisite: Classified standing. Research seminar concentrating on selected topics in the history of the Civil War and its immediate aftermath.
HIST 674. Research Seminar in Recent U.S. History (3)
Prerequisite: Classified standing. Research seminar concentrating on the United States in the 1980s. Students focus on a specific topic within this period or closely related to it that is suitable for primary-source research that can be done at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library in Simi Valley, the Oviatt Library, or other local archives. The main requirement is the preparation of a seminar paper of around 25 pages in length.
HIST 675. Research Seminar in Southern History (3)
Prerequisite: Classified Standing. Students conduct an in-depth examination employing original (primary) sources of a problem or issue of Southern culture, economic, intellectual, or political history from the colonial era to modern times.
HIST 676. Research Seminar in U.S. Economic History (3)
Prerequisite: Classified standing. Students conduct an in-depth examination employing original (primary) sources of a problem or issue in American economic, business, or labor history from the colonial era to modern times.
HIST 681. Research Seminar in the U.S. West (3)
Prerequisite: Classified standing. Students conduct an in-depth examination employing original (primary) sources of a problem or issue in the history of the U.S. West.
HIST 690. Research Seminar in Asian History (3)
Prerequisite: Classified standing. Research seminar dealing with specific areas of Asia, from ancient times to the present.
HIST 693. Directed Research (3-3)
HIST 694. Practicum for Teaching Assistants (3)
Prerequisite: Classified standing. Working under the close supervision of departmental faculty, and assigned to a specific undergraduate history course, students gain experience in creating assignments, grading papers and exams, leading discussion and review sessions, and giving lectures. Students have the opportunity to discuss issues and problems in teaching. May be repeated once for credit.
HIST 695A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses (3)
HIST 697. Directed Comprehensive Studies (3)
Taken during or following the semester in which they complete all their other requirements for the degree, including 30 units of coursework, students prepare for the two written examinations that comprise the comprehensive examination. Students may register for this course only once.
HIST 698. Thesis (3)
Students may enroll after they have completed 30 units of coursework and had their formal program approved. Students work on their thesis, and take the written Proficiency Exam in their second area of study. Students have a 2-year limit in which to finish their thesis from the time they enroll in this course.
HIST 699A-C. Independent Study (3)