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English

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College of Humanities

Staff

  • Martha Alzamora
  • Kavi Bowerman
  • Karin Castillo
  • Eve Green
  • Marjie Seagoe

Faculty

  • Scott Andrews
  • Ian Barnard
  • Dorothy Barresi
  • Guillermo Bartelt
  • Kent Baxter
  • Pamela Bourgeois
  • Michael Bryson
  • Rosa Maria Chacon
  • Ranita Chatterjee
  • Dorothy Clark
  • Irene Clark
  • Susanne Collier
  • Anthony Dawahare
  • Fredric Field
  • Katharine Haake
  • Leilani Hall
  • Charles Hatfield
  • Sharon Klein
  • Scott Kleinman
  • Jack Lopez
  • Robert Lopez
  • Evelyn McClave
  • Rick Mitchell
  • Rei Noguchi
  • Martin Pousson
  • Enchao Shi
  • Jack Solomon
  • Cheryl Spector
  • Jackie Stallcup
  • Sandra Stanley
  • George Uba
  • Patricia Watkins
  • Steven Wexler
  • Beth Wightman

Emeritus Faculty

  • Richard Abcarian
  • David Andersen
  • Joel Athey
  • Gwen Brewer
  • Robert Chianese
  • John Clendenning
  • Lary Gibson
  • Philip Handler
  • Lesley Johnstone
  • Marvin Klotz
  • Barbara Kroll
  • Arthur Lane
  • Patricia Murray
  • Robert Noreen
  • Robert Oliphant
  • Catherine Phelan
  • Elaine Plasberg
  • Robert Reid
  • Iris Shah
  • Lawrence Stewart
  • Arlene Stiebel
  • Harry Stone
  • William Stryker
  • William Walsh
  • Warren Wedin
  • Thomas Wright

Programs

Undergraduate:

B.A., English
  • Option: Literature
  • Option: Creative Writing
  • Option: Subject Matter Program for the Single Subject Credential
  • Option: Four Year Integrated (FYI) English Subject Matter Program for the Single Subject Credential
  • Option: Junior-Year Integrated (JYI) English Subject Matter Program for the Single Subject Credential
  • Option: Honors
  • Minor in Literature
  • Minor in Creative Writing
  • Minor in Writing and Rhetoric

Graduate:

M.A., English
  • Option: Literature
  • Option: Creative Writing
  • Option: Rhetoric and Composition Theory

Mission Statement

The English Department of California State University, Northridge, is a community of teachers, scholars, writers, and support staff whose primary mission is to promote learning in literature, creative writing, composition, and linguistics and to help students acquire knowledge, develop skills, and realize their own intellectual and creative goals. In pursuit of our mission, the department is also committed to promoting faculty development in such areas as research, publication, creative work, and other professional activities for the advancement of knowledge and pedagogy.

Academic Advisement

All members of the English Department faculty participate in undergraduate advisement. Faculty should be consulted during their regularly scheduled office hours (see website). For specific advisement in the major options, students should consult the following faculty advisors:

Literature Option: Jackie Stallcup

Creative Writing Option: Rick Mitchell

English Subject Matter Program for the Single Subject Credential Option: Dorothy Clark

Four-Year Integrated (FYI) and Junior-Year Integrated (JYI) English Subject Matter for the Single Subject Credential Options: Kent Baxter

Honors Option: Michael Bryson

Graduate students seeking advisement should consult the graduate program advisor. Graduate students interested in the Teaching Associate Program should contact the Director of Composition.

Graduate Program: Ranita Chatterjee

Director of Composition: Irene Clark

Student Learning Outcomes of the Undergraduate Program

  1. 1. You will gain the ability to read critically.
  2. 2. You will gain the ability to write effectively.
  3. 3. You will gain a broad knowledge of and ability to engage with relevant theories.
  4. 4. You will gain a broad knowledge of literary and cultural history with an emphasis on British and American literature and culture.
  5. 5. You will gain knowledge of the cultural diversity of literatures.

In addition to these primary learning outcomes, the Department of English has designated additional learning outcomes for the following options:

Students in the Creative Writing Option are expected to attain the following Learning Outcomes:

  1. 1. You will learn to write and revise creative work using techniques and strategies employed by experienced writers.
  2. 2. You will develop the critical ability to read and understand poetry, narrative, and/or drama.
  3. 3. You will learn to reflect on your own creative writing in relation to relevant literary and theoretical traditions.
  4. 4. You will work at advanced levels in at least one creative writing genre.

Students in the Subject Matter Option are expected to attain the following Learning Outcomes:

  1. 1. You will gain knowledge of the nature and structure of the English language and its relationship to other human languages.
  2. 2. You will gain knowledge of and ability to apply rhetorical and composition theory.
  3. 3. You will develop the ability to participate in discourse pertaining to the disciplines of English.

In addition to the above Subject Matter Option Learning Outcomes, students in the Four-Year Integrated and Junior-Year Integrated Subject Matter Options are expected to attain the following Learning Outcomes:

  1. 1. You will develop the ability to engage and support all secondary students (grades 6-12) in learning.
  2. 2. You will develop the ability to create and maintain effective environments for secondary student learning.
  3. 3. You will develop the ability to make subject matter comprehensible for student learning.
  4. 4. You will develop the ability to plan instruction and design learning experiences for all secondary students.
  5. 5. You will develop the ability to assess secondary students’ learning.
  6. 6. You will give evidence of the ability to develop as a professional educator.

Students in the Honors Option are expected to attain the following Learning Outcomes:

  1. 1. You will gain the ability to articulate clear interpretations of cultural texts.
  2. 2 You will gain the ability to engage in independent research and scholarship.
  3. 3. You will gain the ability to present a scholarly paper.

Student Learning Outcomes of the Graduate Program in Literature:

  1. 1. You will gain the ability to apply major critical approaches to the study of English language and literature. 2. You will gain the ability to conduct advanced literary research, including bibliographical and historical study.
  2. 3. You will gain the ability to write advanced analyses that take into account current schools of critical methodology and are informed by professional standards of literary research.
  3. 4. You will gain the ability to present scholarly analyses through conference presentations, including the annual Honors Colloquium and AGSE Spring Conference.

Student Learning Outcomes of the Graduate Program in Creative Writing:

  1. 1. You will develop the ability to apply major critical approaches to the study of English language and literature.
  2. 2. You will demonstrate improvement and a growing sophistication in the application of creative writing techniques.
  3. 3. You will demonstrate familiarity with contemporary literature and proficiency with a variety of poetic, dramatic, and narrative forms, and with the critical vocabulary for discussing those forms.
  4. 4. You will demonstrate an understanding of aspects of the writing profession, including literary publishing, performance, reviewing, and participating in professional conferences.

Student Learning Outcomes of the Graduate Program in Rhetoric and Composition:

  1. 1. You will gain the ability to apply major critical approaches to the study of English language and literature.
  2. 2. You will gain the ability to conduct research appropriate to rhetoric and composition, including bibliographical, historical, ethnographical, and classroom research.
  3. 3. You will gain the ability to write advanced analyses that take into account current schools of rhetorical theory and criticism, and contemporary theories of composition and communication.
  4. 4. You will gain the ability to write and present textual analysis of data-based and qualitative research that would be appropriate for academic dissemination in the fields of composition and rhetoric.
  5. 5. Those intending to be classroom teachers will gain the ability to think critically and reflectively about their teaching, as informed by professional modes of inquiry.

Careers for English Majors

English Majors with the Subject Matter Program for the Single Subject Credential Option gain the academic preparation for teaching careers at the middle school, junior high school or high school level. Many students who obtain the M.A. in English find teaching positions at community colleges or proceed to doctoral programs which might lead to teaching careers at the university level. English studies also provide a good academic foundation for radio and television broadcasting, editing, writing, politics, film and library work, journalism, advertising, public information, public relations, and technical writing. Studies show that English as a pre-professional major is valuable preparation for future careers in law, medicine, business, and local and federal service.

Department Programs

The Department of English offers a wide variety of courses and programs in the fields of literature, language, and writing. One of several options may be selected by students who intend to adopt English as a major or minor, or courses may be taken as electives by non-majors who seek enrichment in the liberal arts.

The undergraduate English Major (consisting of 5 options: Literature; Creative Writing; Subject Matter; FYI and JYI; and Honors) is designed for students who desire to concentrate in one of the different fields subsumed under the broader category of “English.” Students are required to choose one of these options at the time they declare their English major. For further information concerning the choice of options or related career opportunities for those with a B.A. in English, see an option advisor or the Associate Chair of the Department.

  • Literature Option: Focuses on the analytical reading of British and American literature.
  • Creative Writing Option: Provides students with the opportunity to develop narrative, verse, or playwriting skills while building a solid background of study in British and American literature.
  • English Subject Matter Program for the Single Subject Credential Option: Prepares students for a career in teaching English at the middle school and/or high school level. This Option meets the California Commission of Teacher Credentialing subject matter requirements for the English Single Subject Credential. For details on the Single Subject Credential Program, see the Credential and Department of Secondary Education sections in this catalog.
  • Four-Year Integrated (FYI) and Junior-Year Integrated (JYI) English Single Subject Matter Programs for the Single Subject Credential Option: Prepare students for a career in teaching English at the middle school and/or high school level. FYI and JYI integrate English subject matter coursework, GE requirements, and the coursework included in professional preparation, permitting students who successfully complete the program to earn both a B.A. in English and a Single Subject English Preliminary Credential in four years for FYI students and in as few as two years for JYI students. These programs meet the California CTC subject matter requirements for the English Single Subject Credential. For details on the Single Subject Credential Program, see the Credential and Department of Secondary Education sections in this catalog.
  • Honors Option: Enables students, by working independently and in seminars, to develop a strong academic background in preparation for postgraduate study in English or for entry into a variety of postgraduate professional schools. For admission to the Honors Program, see the Honors Option Advisor.
  • Second B.A. in English: Available to students who, having completed the baccalaureate in another field, wish to pursue a second baccalaureate in English. Postbaccalaureate credential candidates in English who are completing the subject matter preparation component of either the preliminary or clear credential may also wish to earn a second baccalaureate, and may do so through this option.
  • Minors in English: 24-unit program with concentration either in literature or creative writing; 18-unit program with concentration in writing and rhetoric--a minor particularly designed for students whose careers are likely to entail professional and/or technical writing. Though a minor is not required for a baccalaureate degree, many students find it desirable.
  • M.A. in English: Consists of three options: Literature, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric and Composition Theory. The English Department offers a limited number of openings for classified graduate students who wish to be Teaching Associates (TAs). TAs enroll in ENGL 600A (for 3 units credit) and 600B, and normally teach, under guidance, one section of Freshman Composition per semester for a stipend. Other teaching opportunities may be available to second-year TAs. For further information concerning choice of option or career opportunities, students should see the Graduate Advisor. To apply for a Teaching Associateship, students should see the Director of Composition.

The English Intern Program

The Department of English provides an internship program for students who are interested in entering the professional writing field. The year-long program consists of a writing and professional development course (English 407) and an off-campus internship (English 494EIP), which provide both the training and experience students need to make the transition into the workplace. For more information, please contact Dr. Kent Baxter, Internship Coordinator, at 677-3425.

CSU International Program

The Department of English supports the concept of international education and encourages students to investigate opportunities for overseas study. Certain courses taken at CSU International Program Study Centers in foreign countries are equivalent to courses in the Department of English and may be used to fulfill some of the requirements for degree options offered by the department and/or certain general education requirements. For more information, students should consult the International Programs Bulletin available in the Office of International and Exchange Programs, the English Department’s Associate Chair, or the campus International Programs Advisor.

Prizes in English

The department offers a number of prizes for students who have excelled in their academic work. For further information on these awards, please see the Department Chair or Associate Chair.

The Rachel Sherwood Poetry Prize

An annual prize awarded by The Northridge Review to the author of the poem judged to be the best published in the magazine during the calendar year. The recipient, who must be a registered student for at least one semester during the year in which the poem is published, will be awarded $150.

The Northridge Review Fiction Award
  • An annual prize awarded by The Northridge Review to the author of the short story judged to be the best published in the magazine during the calendar year. The recipient, who must be a registered student for at least one semester during the year in which the story is published, will be awarded $100.
The Oliver W. Evans Writing Prize

An annual prize of $100 awarded for the best piece of prose, critical or creative, submitted in an upper division English course during the calendar year. Submissions are faculty-nominated.

The Eva Latif Writing Prize in Children’s Literature

A yearly prize of $100 awarded for the best piece of writing, critical or creative, by a student on the subject of children’s literature. Submissions are faculty-nominated.

The Mitchell Marcus Prize in English

A prize of $2,000 awarded each spring semester to the graduate student who is best distinguished by excellence in her or his studies. Applications of currently enrolled classified graduate students are reviewed by a committee of faculty who make the award.

The Annamarie Peterson Morley Award

An award of $1,000 given to a student currently enrolled as an English major at CSUN, who plans to enter the teaching profession at any level.

The Robert apRoberts Honors Essay Prize

An annual award of $150 given to the English Honors student whose thesis is judged to be the best submitted during that academic year.

The Northridge Writing Project Award/The Richard Lid and Helen Lodge Scholarship

An award of $500 given in alternating years to a graduate student enrolled in English or in Secondary English Education, to help pay fees for graduate work.

The Morley-Peterson Scholarship

Up to two awards of $1,000 each, given to undergraduate or graduate students currently enrolled as English majors at CSUN who demonstrate the need for financial support to continue their studies.

The Mahlon Gaumer Award

An award of $500 given to a graduate student for the best critical essay on English literature, with an emphasis on the use of language, submitted during the academic year.

The Harry Finestone Memorial Award

An award of $750 given to the graduate student whose thesis in the study of literature is considered the most distinguished by a faculty panel. Submissions are faculty-nominated.

The Leslie Family Scholarship in English

A faculty nominated award of $1000 given to an undergraduate major in English who plans to teach at the secondary level and who demonstrates the qualities of maturity, patience, purpose, generosity, and compassion associated with the successful classroom teacher.

The Henry Van Slooten Scholarship in English

A prize of $500 given to a lower division student in an English class whose essay best demonstrates her or his “passion for the English language” as determined by a panel of judges.

The Academy of American Poets Prize

A first prize of $100 and two honorable mention awards given by the Academy of American Poets for the best poem(s) submitted. Application forms are available from the creative writing advisor.

Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts Degree

A. Literature Option

1. Lower Division Required Courses (9 Units)

  • ENGL 258 Major English Writers I (3)
  • ENGL 259 Major English Writers II (3)
  • ENGL 275 Major American Writers (3)

2. Upper Division Required Courses (30 Units)

a. Critical Writing (3 units)
  • ENGL 355 Writing about Literature (3)
b. Literary Theory (3 units)
  • ENGL 436 Major Critical Theories (3)
c. Literatures of Cultural Diversity (3 units)
Select one course from the following:
  • ENGL 311 History of African-American Writing (3)
  • ENGL 314 North American Indian Literature (3)
  • ENGL 368 Gay Male Writers (3)
  • ENGL 369 Lesbian Writers (3)
  • ENGL 371 Issues in Jewish-American Writing (3)
  • ENGL 431 Images of Women in Literature (3)
  • ENGL 433 Women Authors (3)
  • ENGL 434 19th-Century Women Novelists (3)
  • ENGL 487 Latino/a Literatures of the Americas (3)

Consult an advisor for current courses in other areas such as Asian American literature, Central American literature, Chicana and Chicano literature, and Pan African or African American literature that may also satisfy this requirement. For the English major, you may not double-count these courses for upper division or Subject Exploration requirements in General Education.

British Literature (9 units)
Select one course from the following:
  • ENGL 414 Chaucer (3)
  • ENGL 416 Shakespeare: Selected Plays (3)
  • ENGL 417 Shakespeare: A Survey (3)
  • ENGL 418 English Drama to 1642 (3)
  • ENGL 443 English Literature of the Middle Ages (3)
  • ENGL 449 The English Renaissance (3)
Select one course from the following:
  • ENGL 419 English Drama 1660-1880 (3)
  • ENGL 420 Milton (3)
  • ENGL 452 17th Century English Literature (3)
  • ENGL 456 The Age of Enlightenment (3)
  • ENGL 466 Major British Novelists I: 1700-1815 (3)
Select one course from the following:
  • ENGL 458 The Romantic Age (3)
  • ENGL 460 The Victorian Age (3)
  • ENGL 467 Major British Novelists II: 1815-1900 (3)
American Literature to 1912 (3 units)
Select one course from the following:
  • ENGL 473 American Literature: 1607-1860 (3)
  • ENGL 474 American Literature: 1860-1912 (3)
  • ENGL 477 Major American Novelists I: 19th-Century (3)
Twentieth Century Literature (6 units)
Select two courses from the following:
  • ENGL 427 Drama from Ibsen to the Present (3)
  • ENGL 461 Modern British Literature (3)
  • ENGL 462 Contemporary British Literature (3)
  • ENGL 463A Modern Poetry (3)
  • ENGL 463B Contemporary Poetry (3)
  • ENGL 468 Major British Novelists III: 1900-Present (3)
  • ENGL 475 American Literature: 1912-1945 (3)
  • ENGL 476 Contemporary American Literature (3)
  • ENGL 478 Major American Novelists II: 20th Century (3)
Senior Seminar (3 units)
  • ENGL 495 Senior Seminar in Literature (3)

3. Upper Division Electives (9 Units)

  • Select any upper division English courses except: 300, 305, 316, 364.

General Education: The standard General Education requirement is 48 units; however, English majors are permitted to double count 3 units from the lower division major requirements (208, 258, 259, 275) for both GE Subject Explorations-Arts and Humanities and the major. Electives: Students majoring in English are encouraged to take a foreign language as part of their college program.

  • Total Units in Option I
  • 48
  • General Education Units
  • 45
  • Additional Units
  • 27
  • Total Units Required for a B.A. Degree
  • 120

B. Creative Writing Option

1. Lower Division Required Courses (6 Units)

a. Creative Writing (3 units)
  • ENGL 208 Introduction to Creative Writing (3)
b. Literature (3 units)
Select one from the following:
  • ENGL 258 Major English Writers I (3)
  • ENGL 259 Major English Writers II (3)
  • ENGL 275 Major American Writers (3)

2. Upper Division Required Courses (33 Units)

a. Critical Writing (3 units)
  • ENGL 355 Writing about Literature (3)
b. Literary Theory (3 units)
  • ENGL 436 Major Critical Theories (3)
c. Literatures of Cultural Diversity (3 units)
Select one of the following:
  • ENGL 311 History of African-American Writing (3)
  • ENGL 314 North American Indian Literature (3)
  • ENGL 368 Gay Male Writers (3)
  • ENGL 369 Lesbian Writers (3)
  • ENGL 371 Issues in Jewish-American Writing (3)
  • ENGL 431 Images of Women in Literature (3)
  • ENGL 433 Women Authors (3)
  • ENGL 434 19th Century Women Novelists (3)
  • ENGL 487 Latino/a Literature (3)
  • Consult an advisor for current courses in other areas such as Asian American literature, Central American literature, Chicana and Chicano literature, and Pan African or African American literature that may also satisfy this requirement. For the English major, you may not double-count these courses for upper division or Subject Exploration requirements in General Education.
d. British Literature before 1900 (3 units)
Select one course from the following:
  • ENGL 414 Chaucer (3)
  • ENGL 416 Shakespeare: Selected Plays (3)
  • ENGL 417 Shakespeare: Survey (3)
  • ENGL 418 English Drama to 1642 (3)
  • ENGL 419 English Drama 1660-1880 (3)
  • ENGL 420 Milton (3)
  • ENGL 443 English Literature of the Middle Ages (3)
  • ENGL 449 The English Renaissance (3)
  • ENGL 452 17th Century English Literature (3)
  • ENGL 456 The Age of Enlightenment (3)
  • ENGL 458 The Romantic Age (3)
  • ENGL 460 The Victorian Age (3)
  • ENGL 466 Major British Novelists I: 1700-1815 (3)
  • ENGL 467 Major British Novelists II: 1815-1900 (3)
e. American Literature to 1912 (3 units)
Select one course from the following:
  • ENGL 473 American Literature: 1607-1860 (3)
  • ENGL 474 American Literature: 1860-1912 (3)
  • ENGL 477 Major American Novelists I: 19th-Century (3)
f. Twentieth Century Literature (3 units)
Select one of the following:
  • ENGL 427 Drama from Ibsen to Present (3)
  • ENGL 461 Modern British Literature (3)
  • ENGL 462 Contemporary British Literature (3)
  • ENGL 463A Modern Poetry (3)
  • ENGL 463B Contemporary Poetry (3)
  • ENGL 468 Major British Novelists III: 1900
  • to the Present (3)
  • ENGL 475 American Literature: 1912-1945 (3)
  • ENGL 476 Contemporary American Literature (3)
  • ENGL 478 Major American Novel II: 20th-Century (3)
g. Creative Writing (9 units) Select three of the following (course may be repeated and counted as second course):
  • ENGL 308 Narrative Writing (3)
  • ENGL 309 Verse Writing (3)
  • ENGL 310 Playwriting (3)
  • ENGL 408 Advanced Narrative Writing (3)
  • ENGL 409 Advanced Verse Writing (3)
  • ENGL 410 Advanced Dramatic Writing (3)
  • ENGL 457A-Z Selected Topics in Creative Writing (3)
h. Creative Writing Theory (3 units)
Select one of the following:
  • ENGL 464 Theories of Poetry (3)
  • ENGL 465 Theories of Fiction (3)
i. Senior Seminar (3 units)
Select one of the following:
  • ENGL 490 Senior Seminar in Narrative Writing (3)
  • ENGL 491 Senior Seminar in Verse Writing (3)

3. Upper Division Electives (6 Units)

ENGL 300, 305, 316, 364 are not permitted as electives in this option.

General Education: The standard General Education requirement is 48 units; however, English majors are permitted to double count 3 units from the lower division major requirements (208, 258, 259, 275) for both GE Subject Explorations-Arts and Humanities and for the major. Students majoring in English are encouraged to take a foreign language as part of their college program.

  • Total Units in the Option II
  • 45
  • General Education Units
  • 45
  • Additional Units
  • 30
  • Total Units Required for a B.A. Degree
  • 120

C. English Subject Matter Program for the Single Subject Credential Option

The English Subject Matter Option is designed for prospective secondary school English teachers and is a state-approved waiver program. Students receive a B.A. in English and a single-subject competency waiver by completing the approved coursework with no grade below a C and maintaining a GPA of 2.99 or better; students must also complete the Subject Matter Exit Interview, the English Department’s exit evaluation of single-subject competence. In compliance with state requirements, students must complete 20 hours of daytime Early Field Experience in schools.

To be eligible for the credential program in the College of Education, students must also pass the CBEST and complete 45 hours of classroom observation at a school site. Upon completion of coursework adhering to the above requirements and successful completion of the English Subject Matter Exit Interview, students are eligible to enter a traditional credential program in the College of Education. For further information about the single-subject credential in English, consult the Credential Office.

The English Subject Matter Option combines a 42-unit core with a specified emphasis of 12 units in one of six Extended Study areas. Students should consult with the Subject Matter Advisor before they achieve their junior standing to review their coursework and to choose an emphasis. Transfer students should also see the Subject Matter Advisor as soon as possible for academic advising. Transfer students should review the lower- division GE courses required for this Option.

Core Program (42 Units)

1. Lower Division Required Courses (9 Units)

  • Complete the following (one of which may be double-counted for a lower division GE):
  • ENGL 258 Major English Writers I (3)
  • ENGL 259 Major English Writers II (3)
  • ENGL 275 Major American Writers (3)

2. Upper Divison Required Courses (33 Units)

  • Upper Division GE Courses (6-units double-count):
  • COMS 309 Advanced Public Speaking (3)
  • TH 473/L Dramatic Performance in the Secondary
  • Language-Arts Curriculum (3)
Take all five of the following:
  • ENGL 355 Writing about Literature (3)
  • ENGL 406 Advanced Expository Writing for Teachers (3)
  • ENGL 429 Adolescent Literature (3)
  • ENGL 436 Major Critical Theories (3)
  • ENGL 495ESM Senior Seminar in Literature: English Subject Matter (3)
Shakespeare (3 units)
Select one course from the following:
  • ENGL 416 Shakespeare: Selected Plays (3)
  • ENGL 417 Shakespeare: A Survey (3)
Literatures of Cultural Diversity (3 units)
Select one course from the following:
  • ENGL 311 History of African-American Writing (3)
  • ENGL 314 North American Indian Literature (3)
  • ENGL 368 Gay Male Writers (3)
  • ENGL 369 Lesbian Writers (3)
  • ENGL 371 Issues in Jewish-American Writing (3)
  • ENGL 431 Images of Women in Writing (3)
  • ENGL 433 Women Authors (3)
  • ENGL 434 19th Century Women Novelists (3)
  • ENGL 487 Latino/a Literature (3)
  • AAS 321 Asian American Fiction (3)
  • CHS 380 Chicana/o Literature (3)
  • CHS 381 Contemporary Chicana Literature (3)
  • PAS 344 Literature of Caribbean and African Experience (3)
  • PAS 346 Contemporary Black Female Writers (3)
Linguistics and Language Study (6 units)
Take the following:
  • ENGL 301 Language and Linguistics (3)
Select one course from the following:
  • ENGL 302 Introduction to Modern Grammar (3)
  • ENGL 405 Language Differences and Language Change (3)

Verification of Early Field Experience: Students must supply verification of completed early field experience.

Verification of Successful Basic Syntax, Grammar, and Written Usage Diagnostic: Students must successfully complete exercises assessing their mechanics and written usage skills.

Extended Study (12 Units)

  • Students must choose one of the following Extended Study emphases for broad perspective and specific focus.

Literature Extended Study

Perspective and Focus (12 units): Select 3 units from a British Age Course and 3 units from an American Age Course. Six (6) units must be chosen from the remaining three categories: Major Authors, Genre courses, and Elective courses. Students must choose to concentrate in a particular area or blend areas.

Choose 3 units from British Age Courses: ENGL 443, 449, 452, 456, 458, 460, 461, 462, 466, 467, 468;

Choose 3 units from American Age Courses: ENGL 473, 474, 475, 476, 477, 478;

Choose 6 units from Major Author Courses: ENGL 414, 420, 470A-Z (as appropriate);

or Genre Courses: ENGL 418, 419, 423, 424, 426, 427, 428, 430, 463A, 463B;

or Electives: ENGL *311, 312, 313, *314, 360, 363, *368, *369, 370, *371, 372, 396A-Z, *431, *433, *434, 480, 483, 485, 486, *487, 488, 489, 495A-Z (excluding 495ESM), 496A-Z, 499.

  • * Because a Literatures of Cultural Diversity course is part of the core requirements, students cannot double count that class. Students must take courses not included as part of the core requirement.

Creative Writing Extended Study

Perspective and Focus (12 units):

All students must take: ENGL 208 (3 units)

Select 3 units from the following courses: 308, 309, 310

Select 3 units from the following courses: 408, 409, 410, 457

Select 3 units from: 464 or 465

Linguistics and Diversity Extended Study

Perspective and Focus (12 Units):

All students must take: ENGL 400 (3 units) and LING 417 (3 units)

Select 3 units from the following courses: CHS 482 or PAS 395 or (if not selected for core linguistics) ENGL 405

Select 3 units from the following courses: COMS 356 or LING 427

Literatures of Diversity Extended Study

Perspective and Focus (12 Units):

Students may either focus their 12 units by choosing from ONE of the subject categories listed below OR combine courses adding up to 12 units from any of the subject categories listed below.

  • *Because a Literature of Cultural Diversity course is part of the core requirements, students cannot double count that class. Students must take courses not included as part of the core requirement.

Students must choose only one lower division course from those listed:

Asian American Literature:
  • AAS 220 Survey of Asian American Literature (3)
  • AAS 321 Asian American Fiction (3)
  • AAS 325A Asian American Creative Studies Workshop: Literary Arts (3)
  • AAS 420 Asian American Literary Self Representations (3)
Pan African Studies:
  • PAS 344 Literature of the Caribbean and African Experience (3)
  • PAS 34 African-American Autobiography (3)
  • PAS 346 Contemporary Black Female Writers (3)
  • PAS 447 African-American Theater (3)
  • ENGL 311 History of African-American Writing (3)
Chicana/o Studies:
  • CHS 132 Chicana/o Poetry (3)
  • CHS 201 Survey of Mexican Literature in Translation (3)
  • CHS 380 Chicana/o Literature (3)
  • CHS 381 Contemporary Chicana Literature (3)
  • CHS 480 Children’s Literature of Latin America in
  • Translation (3)
  • ENGL 487 Latino/a Literatures of the Americas (3)
Armenian Literature:
  • ARMN 315 Masterpieces of Armenian Literature (3)
Jewish-American Literature:
  • ENGL 371 Issues in Jewish-American Writing (3)
Gay/Lesbian Literature:
  • ENGL 368 Gay Male Writer (3)
  • ENGL 369 Lesbian Writers (3)
Women’s Literature:
  • ENGL 431 Images of Women in Writing (3)
  • ENGL 433 Women Authors (3)
  • ENGL 434 19th Century Women Novelists (3)
American Indian Literature:
  • ENGL 314 North American Indian Literature (3)

Communication Studies Extended Study

Perspective and Focus (12 Units):

Students should seek advisement from the Communication Studies Advisor before choosing their coursework.

Select 12 units from the following courses:

  • COMS 104 Literature in Performance (3)
  • COMS 255/L Argumentation (2/1)
  • COMS 301 Performance, Language and Cultural Studies (3)
  • COMS 303 Narrative in Performance (3)
  • COMS 304 Poetry in Performance (3)
  • COMS 320 Communicative Functions of Language (3)
  • COMS 323 Group Communication (3)
  • COMS 325 Legal Argumentation (3)
  • COMS 356 Intercultural Communication (3)
  • COMS 360 Communication and the Sexes (3)
  • COMS 400C Directing Oral Performance (Debate) (3)
  • COMS 425 Theories of Argumentation and Deliberation (3)
  • COMS 437 Communication for Youth Institute (work
  • with middle school students on public speaking skills) (3)

Theatre Extended Study:

Perspective and Focus (12 units):

Please see the Subject Matter Advisor in Theater for specific information concerning course sequencing and requirements for Production Participation, Independent Study, and Internship in the Arts:

  • TH 111 Actors and Acting (3)
  • TH 315 World Drama (3)
  • TH 371/L Creative Drama (3)
  • TH 490A Production Participation (1)
  • TH 599A Independent Study (1)

General Education: To meet the 48-unit GE requirement, students may double count 3 units from the Lower Division major requirements (258, 259, 275), and students may double count Communication Studies 309 and Theatre 473/473L for both GE-Humanities and for the major. Students majoring in English are encouraged to take a foreign language as part of their college program.

  • Total Units in the Option III
  • 54
  • General Education Units
  • 39
  • Additional Units
  • 27
  • Total Units Required for a B.A. Degree
  • 120

D. Four-Year Integrated English Single Subject Matter Credential Program (FYI) Option

The Four-Year Integrated English Teacher Credential Program (FYI-English) for freshmen requires that students apply and be accepted to the program; readiness for college level work is one prerequisite. Students admitted to the FYI Program will be assigned to a cohort in their freshman year, and they, with their cohort, will complete the coursework in the designated order outlined here. FYI-English integrates English subject matter coursework and the coursework included in professional preparation. The Program also includes all General Education and Title 5 coursework, permitting students who successfully complete the Program to earn both a B.A. in English and a Single Subject English Preliminary Credential in four years. NOTE: For additional information, please consult the Credential Office, the FYI-English Advisor in the Department of English, or the Department of Secondary Education.

Fall Semester, Year One (16 units)

  • ENGL 155 Freshman Composition (3)
  • MATH 131 (or other GE Math) Mathematical Ideas (3)
  • RS 101 (or other GE Arts and Humanities) The Bible (3)
  • UNIV 100 Freshman Seminar (GE Lifelong Learning) (3)

Choose three units from the GE Natural Sciences Section (3)

Choose one GE Natural Sciences Lab (1)

Spring Semester, Year One (16 units)

  • ENGL 258 Major English Writers I (3)
  • ENGL 275 Major American Writers (3)

Choose three units from the GE Natural Sciences Section (3)

Choose one GE Natural Sciences lab (1)

  • COMS 151/L Public Speaking (2/1)
  • ENGL 250FE Perspectives on English Studies for Teachers (3)

Fall Semester, Year Two (15 Units)

  • ENGL 259 Major English Writers II (3)
  • ENGL 355 Writing about Literature (3)

Select Title 5 (Requirement 1) course (3)

AAS 201, PAS 204, or CHS 202 Race, Racism, and Critical Thinking (3)

Choose three units from the GE Comparative Cultural Studies Section (3)

Spring Semester, Year Two (15 units)

  • ENGL 363 Study of Poetry (Extended Study 1) (3)
  • COMS 309 Advanced Public Speaking (3)
  • PSY 312 Psychological Aspects of Parenthood (3)
  • EPC 420 Educational Psychology of Adolescence(3)
  • ENGL 311 History of African-American Writing (3)
  • or ENGL 371 Issues in Jewish-American Writing (Extended Study 2) (3)

Fall Semester, Year Three (16 Units)

  • ENGL 416 Shakespeare: Selected Play (3)
  • or ENGL 417 Shakespeare Survey (3)
  • Choose three units of British Literature: ENGL 443, 449, 452, 456, 458, 460, 461, 462, 466, 467, 468 (Extended Study 3) (3)
  • HSCI 496ADO Health Concerns of Adolescents (1)
  • AAS/ARMN/CHS/ELPS/PAS 417 Equity and Diversity in Schools (3)
  • SED 511 Fundamentals of Secondary Education in Multiethnic Secondary Schools (3)
  • TH 473/L Dramatic Performance in the Secondary Language Arts Curriculum with lab (2/1)

Spring Semester, Year Three (15 units)

  • ENGL 436 Major Critical Theories (3)
  • or ENGL 438 Critical Approaches to Literature (3)
  • Choose 3 units American Literature: ENGL 473, 474, 475, 476, 477, 478 (Extended Study 4) (3)
  • ENGL 301 Language and Linguistics (3)
  • ENGL 406 Advanced Expository Writing for Teachers(3)
  • SED 514 Computers in the Instructional Program (3)

Additional Requirements for Spring Semester, Year Three Students Should:

  • 1. Successfully complete the English Subject Matter Exit Interview with two members of the English Department (see advisor)
  • 2. Take the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam (UDWPE)
  • 3. Apply for Admission to the Credential Program,
  • 4. Take the CBEST examination
  • 5. Apply for the Certificate of Clearance from the Commission on Teacher Credentialing

Summer Year Three or Prior to Year Four Spring Semester

Choose an additional three units from Title 5 (Part 2) (3)

Fall Semester, Year Four (15 units)

  • SED 525EN Methods of Teaching English (3)
  • ENGL 302 Introduction to Modern Grammar (3)
  • ENGL 429 Literature for Adolescents (3)
  • SPED 420 Improving the Learning of Students with Special Needs through Differentiated Instruction and Collaboration (3)
  • SED 554/554S Supervised Field Experience and Field Experience Seminar (3 + 1)

Spring Semester, Year Four (12 units)

  • ENGL 495ESM Senior Seminar in Literature (3)
  • SED 521 Language, Literacy and Learning in MultiethnicSecondary Schools (3)
  • SED 554/555S Supervised Practicum and Practicum Seminar (5+1)

Additional Requirements for the FYI English Single Subject Matter Credential Program (FYI) Option

  • 1. Earn a grade of C or better and GPA of 2.99 or higher in ENGL 250FE, 258, 259, 275, 301, 302, 355, 363, 406, 416/417, 429, 495ESM; upper division ENGL courses; COMS 309, and TH 473/L
  • 2. Maintain an overall GPA of 2.75 or higher
  • 3. Earn a grade of C or better and GPA of 3.0 or higher in SED 511, 514, 521, 525EN, 554, 555; EPC 420; AAS/ARMN/CHS/ELPS/PAS 417; HSCI 496ADO; and SPED 401C
  • 4. Complete a Professional Teaching Portfolio (in SED 555)
  • 5. Develop and complete an Induction Plan (in SED 555)
  • Total English Subject Matter Units
  • 54
  • Total Single Subject Credential Units
  • 32
  • Total Units Required for Option IV
  • 124

E. Option Junior-Year Integrated (JYI) English Subject Matter Program for the Single Subject Credential

JYI-English begins in the junior year for students who apply and are accepted to the program. This Program integrates undergraduate subject matter knowledge with professional credential preparation content and experiences, and it leads to both the B.A. in English and the Single Subject Preliminary Credential in English. For admission, students must be juniors who have completed the lower division general education requirements, including Title 5 parts 1 and 2, and the lower division core of the English Subject Matter Option major.

Applications to both the University and to the Credential Program are necessary. Students will be responsible for successfully completing the English Subject Matter Exit Interview and the CSUN Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam (UDWPE); and for meeting the basic skills requirement (generally, passing the California Basic Educational Skills Test) . Paralleling the FYI-English Program, the JYI-English Option requires students to complete the Extended Study requirement in Literature. Students considering the JYI-English Program should seek advisement as soon as possible for guidance in meeting admission and program requirements.

Courses Required Prior to SED 554/554S

  • ENGL 250FE Perspectives on English Studies for Teachers (3)
  • ENGL 355 Writing About Literature (3)
  • ENGL 311 History of African American Writing (3)
  • or ENGL 371 Issues in Jewish American Writing (3)
  • ENGL 301 Language and Linguistics(3)
  • ENGL 363 Study of Poetry (3)
  • SED 511 Fundamentals of Teaching in Multiethnic Secondary Schools(3)
  • EPC 420 Educational Psychology of Adolescence(3)
  • SED 525EN Methods of Teaching English (3)

Required Prior to or Concurrent with SED 554/554S

  • ENGL 406 Advanced Expository Writing for Teachers (3)
  • ENGL 429 Literature for Adolescents (3)
  • ENGL 416 Shakespeare: Selected Plays
  • or ENGL 417 Shakespeare Survey (3)
  • ENGL 436 Major Critical Theories
  • or ENGL 438 Critical Approaches to Literature (3)

Required Prior to SED 555/555S

  • SED 554/554S Supervised Field Experience and Field Experience Seminar (3 + 1)

Required Prior to or Concurrent with SED 555/555S

  • ENGL 302 Introduction to Modern Grammar (3)
  • COMS 309 Advanced Public Speaking (3)
  • American Literature Extended Study: Select one of the following: ENGL 473, 474, 475, 476, 477, 478
  • British Literature Extended Study: Select one of the following: ENGL 443, 449, 452, 456, 458, 460, 461, 462, 466, 467, 468
  • TH 473/L Dramatic Performance in the Secondary Language Arts Curriculum and Lab (2/1)
  • ENGL 495ESM Senior Seminar in Literature for English Subject Matter Programs (3)
  • SPED 420 Improving the Learning of Students with Special Needs through Differentiated Instruction and Collaboration (3)
  • AAS/ARMN/CHS/ELPS/
  • PAS 417 Equity and Diversity in Schools (3)
  • SED 521 Literacy, Language, and Learning in Multiethnic Secondary Schools (3)

Courses Required for Program Completion

  • SED 514 Technology in Instruction (3)
  • HSCI 496ADO Health Concerns of Adolescents (1)
  • SED 555/555S Supervised Practicum and Practicum Seminar (5 + 1)

Additional Requirements for the JYI English Single Subject Matter Program (JYI) for the Single Subject Credential Option. Students Should:

  • 1. Earn a grade of C or better and maintain a GPA of 2.99 in ENGL 250FE, 301, 302, 311 or 371, 355, 363, 406, 416 or 417, 429, 436 or 438, and 495ESM; COMS 309; TH 473/L; and upper division Extended Study in English;
  • 2. Earn a grade of C or better and a GPA of 3.0 in SED 511, 514, 521, 525EN, 554, 555; EPC 420; AAS/ARMN/CHS/ELPS/PAS 417; HSCI 496ADO; and SPED 401C;
  • 3. Maintain an overall GPA of 2.75 or above;
  • 4. Apply for admission to the Credential Program prior to Fall of the Junior Year or as per advisement;
  • 5. Successfully complete the English Subject Matter Culminating Interview;
  • 6. Complete the Professional Teaching Portfolio (Teaching Performance Assessment) (SED 555); and
  • 7. Develop and complete an Individual Induction Plan (SED 555).
  • Total English Subject Matter Units
  • 45
  • Total Single Subject Credential Units
  • 32
  • Total Units Required for JYI English Option V
  • 77

F. Honors Program Option

Requirements for admission to the Honors Option: The program leading to the B.A. degree with Honors in English offers students the opportunity to engage in various approaches to English Studies through courses, seminars, and independent reading, writing, and research. Admission into the program—to begin normally in the first semester of the junior year—is by approval of the Honors Option Advisor.

1. Lower Division Required Courses (9 Units)

  • ENGL 258 Major English Writers I (3)
  • ENGL 259 Major English Writers II (3)
  • ENGL 275 Major American Writers (3)

2. Upper Division Required Courses (27 Units)

a. Literary Theory (3 units)
  • ENGL 436 Major Critical Theories (3)
b. Literatures of Cultural Diversity (3 units)
Select one course from the following:
  • ENGL 311 History of African-American Writing (3)
  • ENGL 314 North American Indian Literature (3)
  • ENGL 368 Gay Male Writers (3)
  • ENGL 369 Lesbian Writers (3)
  • ENGL 371 Issues in Jewish-American Writing (3)
  • ENGL 431 Images of Women in Literature (3)
  • ENGL 433 Women Authors (3)
  • ENGL 434 19th-Century Women Novelists (3)
  • ENGL 487 Latino/a Literature (3)

Consult an advisor for current courses in other areas such as Asian American literature, Central American literature, Chicana and Chicano literature, and Pan African or African American literature that may also satisfy this requirement. For the English major, you may not double-count these courses for upper division or Subject Exploration requirements in General Education.

c. British and American Literature (6 units)
British Literature (3 units)
Select one course from the following:
  • ENGL 419 English Drama 1660-1880 (3)
  • ENGL 443 English Literature of the Middle Ages (3)
  • ENGL 449 The English Renaissance (3)
  • ENGL 452 The Early 17th Century (3)
  • ENGL 456 The Age of Enlightenment (3)
  • ENGL 458 The Romantic Age (3)
  • ENGL 460 The Victorian Age (3)
  • ENGL 461 Modern British Literature (3)
  • ENGL 462 Contemporary British Literature (3)
  • ENGL 466 Major British Novelists I: 1700- 1815 (3)
  • ENGL 467 Major British Novelists II: 1815-1900 (3)
  • ENGL 468 Major British Novelists III: 1900 to the present (3)
American Literature (3 units)
Select one course from the following:
  • ENGL 473 American Literature: 1607-1860 (3)
  • ENGL 474 American Literature: 1860-1912 (3)
  • ENGL 475 American Literature: 1912-1945 (3)
  • ENGL 476 Contemporary American Literature (3)
  • ENGL 477 Major American Novelists I: 19th-Century (3)
  • ENGL 478 Major American Novelists II:20th-Century (3)
d. Junior Honors Seminars (6 units)
  • ENGL 392 Junior Honors Seminar I (3)
  • ENGL 393 Junior Honors Seminar II (3)
  • ENGL 392 and ENGL 393 may be taken in any sequence.
e. Senior Honors Seminars (6 units)
  • ENGL 492 Senior Honors Seminar I (3)
  • ENGL 493 Senior Honors Seminar II (3)
  • ENGL 492 and ENGL 493 may be taken in any sequence.
f. Honors Thesis Project (3 units)
  • ENGL 497 Honors Thesis (3) English 497 may not be offered every term.

3. Upper Division Electives (9 Units)

Select any upper division English courses except 300, 305, 316, 364.

General Education: The standard General Education requirement is 48 units; however, English majors are permitted to double count 3 units from the Lower Division major requirements (208, 258, 259, 275) for both GE Subject Explorations-Arts and Humanities and for the major.Students majoring in English are encouraged to take a foreign language as part of their college program.

  • Total Units in Option VI
  • 45
  • General Education Units
  • 45
  • Additional Units
  • 30
  • Total Units Required for a B.A. Degree
  • 120

Graduation with Honors

To be graduated from the Honors Program, a student needs a GPA of 3.5 or better in his or her upper division English courses. A special “Honors” notation will appear on your diploma and you will be invited to participate in the University’s Honors Convocation.

Minor In English

A. Option I. Minor In Literature

1. Lower Division Required Courses (6 Units)

Choose two of the following:
  • ENGL 258 Major English Writers I (3)
  • ENGL 259 Major English Writers II (3)
  • ENGL 275 Major American Writers (3)

2. Upper Division Required Courses (15 Units)

  • ENGL 355 Writing about Literature (3)
British Literature before 1900 (3 units)
Select one course from the following:
  • ENGL 414 Chaucer (3)
  • ENGL 416 Shakespeare: Selected Plays (3)
  • ENGL 417 Shakespeare: A Survey (3)
  • ENGL 418 English Drama to 1642 (3)
  • ENGL 419 English Drama 1660-1880 (3)
  • ENGL 420 Milton (3)
  • ENGL 443 English Literature of the Middle Ages (3)
  • ENGL 449 The English Renaissance (3)
  • ENGL 452 17th Century English Literature (3)
  • ENGL 456 The Age of Enlightenment (3)
  • ENGL 458 The Romantic Age (3)
  • ENGL 460 The Victorian Age (3)
  • ENGL 466 Major British Novelists I: 1700-1815 (3)
  • ENGL 467 Major British Novelists II: 1815-1900 (3)
American Literature to 1912 (3 units)
Select one course from the following:
  • ENGL 473 American Literature: 1607-1860 (3)
  • ENGL 474 American Literature: 1860-1912 (3)
  • ENGL 477 Major American Novelists I.: the 19th Century (3)
Twentieth Century Literature (3 units)
Select one of the following:
  • ENGL 427 Drama from Ibsen to Present (3)
  • ENGL 461 Modern British Literature (3)
  • ENGL 462 Contemporary British Literature (3)
  • ENGL 463A Modern Poetry (3)
  • ENGL 463B Contemporary Poetry (3)
  • ENGL 468 Major British Novelists III: 1900
  • to the Present (3)
  • ENGL 475 American Literature: 1912-1945 (3)
  • ENGL 476 Contemporary American Literature (3)
  • ENGL 478 Major American Novelists II: 20th Century (3)
Senior Seminar (3 units)
  • ENGL 495 Senior Seminar in Literature (Senior standing required) (3)

3. Upper Division Electives (3 units)

  • Suggested: ENGL 311, 314, 368, 369, 371, 431, 433, 434, or 436. Not permitted as electives in this option: ENGL 300, 305, 316, 364.

B. Option II. Minor In Creative Writing

1. Lower Division Required Courses (6 units)

  • All students minoring in this option must complete the following lower division requirements.
  • ENGL 208 Creative Writing (3)
Select one of the following (3 units)
  • ENGL 258 Major English Writers I (3)
  • ENGL 259 Major English Writers II (3)
  • ENGL 275 Major American Writers (3)

2. Upper Division Required Courses (15 units)

British and American Literature (3 units)
Select one course from the following:
  • ENGL 414 Chaucer (3)
  • ENGL 416 Shakespeare: Selected Plays (3)
  • ENGL 417 Shakespeare: A Survey (3)
  • ENGL 418 English Drama to 1642 (3)
  • ENGL 419 English Drama 1660-1880 (3)
  • ENGL 420 Milton (3)
  • ENGL 443 English Literature of the Middle Ages (3)
  • ENGL 449 The English Renaissance (3)
  • ENGL 452 17th Century English Literature (3)
  • ENGL 456 The Age of Enlightenment (3)
  • ENGL 458 The Romantic Age (3)
  • ENGL 460 The Victorian Age (3)
  • ENGL 466 Major British Novelists I: 1700-1815 (3)
  • ENGL 467 Major British Novelists II: 1815-1900 (3)
  • ENGL 473 American Literature: 1607-1860 (3)
  • ENGL 474 American Literature: 1860-1912 (3)
  • ENGL 477 Major American Novelists I: 19th Century (3)
Twentieth Century Literature (3 units)
Select one course from the following:
  • ENGL 427 Drama from Ibsen to the Present (3)
  • ENGL 461 Modern British Literature (3)
  • ENGL 462 Contemporary British Literature (3)
  • ENGL 463A Modern Poetry (3)
  • ENGL 463B Contemporary Poetry (3)
  • ENGL 468 Major British Novelists III: 1900 to the Present (3)
  • ENGL 475 American Literature: 1912-1945 (3)
  • ENGL 476 Contemporary American Literature (3)
  • ENGL 478 Major American Novelists II: 20th Century (3)
Creative Writing (6 units) Select two of the following (courses may be repeated and counted as second course):
  • ENGL 308 Narrative Writing (3)
  • ENGL 309 Verse Writing (3)
  • ENGL 310 Playwriting (3)
  • ENGL 408 Advanced Narrative Writing (3)
  • ENGL 409 Advanced Verse Writing (3)
  • ENGL 410 Advanced Dramatic Writing (3)
Choose one from the following (3 units)
  • ENGL 490 Senior Seminar/Narrative Writing (3)
  • ENGL 491 Senior Seminar/Verse Writing (3)

3. Upper Division Electives (3 Units)

Suggested: ENGL 311, 314, 368, 369, 371, 431, 433, 434, or 436. Not permitted as electives in this option: ENGL 300, 305, 316, 364.

C. Option III. Minor in Writing and Rhetoric

Upper Division Required Courses (12 units)
Select four courses from the following:
  • ENGL 306 Report Writing (3)
  • ENGL 407 Composition and the Professions (3) ENGL 455 Literacy, Rhetoric, and Culture (3)
  • ENGL 459A-Z Selected Topics in Writing and Rhetoric (pending)
  • ENGL 494 Internship (3)
Electives (6 units)
Select two courses from the following:
  • ART 244 Graphic Design (3)
  • BLAW 470 CS Legal Research and Writing in Business (3)
  • MKT 498 Field Assignments and Reports—Management (3)
  • MKT 440 Integrated Marketing Communications (3)
  • CHS 405 Chicana/os and the Media (3)
  • CHS 433 Language Acquisition of the Chicana/o and ESL Speakers (3)
  • CHS 482 Language of the Barrio (3)
  • COMS 309 Advanced Public Speaking (3)
  • COMS 325 Legal Argumentation (3)
  • COMS 356 Intercultural Communication (3)
  • COMS 443 Rhetoric of Business (3)
  • COMS 444 Political Rhetoric (3)
  • COMS 454 Communication and Technology (3)
  • ENGL 205 Business Communication in its Rhetorical Contexts (3)
  • ENGL 302 Introduction to Modern Grammar (3)
  • ENGL 305 Intermediate Expository Writing (3)
  • ENGL 355 Writing About Literature (3)
  • ENGL 405 Language Differences and Language Change (3)
  • ENGL 406 Advanced Expository Writing for Teachers (3)
  • ENGL 412 Literary Magazine (3)
  • HIST 301 The Historian’s Craft: Reading, Research, and Writing History (3)
  • JOUR 340 Principles of Public Relations (3)
  • JOUR 390 Freedom of the Press (3)
  • JOUR 400 Mass Communication Law and Ethics (3)
  • JOUR 465 Mass Communication and Popular Culture (3)
  • JOUR 478 International News Media (3)
  • JOUR 480 History of the American News Media (3)
  • PAS 395 Bilingualism in the African-American Community (3)

Second Bachelor of Arts Degree in English

Students seeking a second B.A. in English in any of the options described above should note the university regulations governing second degrees. Students admitted into the Second B.A. program must take at least 24 units in the English major in residence. To complete the major they must have a total of 36-48 units in English, the exact number to be determined by advisement. At least 24 of these units shall be upper division English courses; 6 units may be in upper division courses outside of English with prior approval of the Department Chair or Associate Chair. Students must obtain, at their first registration for this program, an evaluation of all earlier work in English.

Requirements for the Master of Arts Degree

In addition to the University requirements, the English department requires that students meet one of two conditions before being admitted into the department program:

  • 1. Students with a B.A. in English must have a minimum GPA of 3.0 in upper division English courses; this GPA is determined by the cumulative GPA of all approved upper division English courses.
  • 2. Students with a B.A. in a subject other than English must have a minimum of 24 semester units of approved upper division English courses with a minimum 3.00 GPA in these courses; this GPA is determined by the cumulative GPA of all approved Upper Division English courses.

One of these two conditions must be met before a student may be admitted into the English Department M.A. program in either conditionally classified or classified status. Applicants who, upon departmental evaluation, do not possess enough qualifying units or the required GPA need to take additional undergraduate upper division English courses to make up any deficits before admission into the program.

Once students have met the above requirements, they may be admitted into the program. However, there are further conditions that must be met before students can be fully admitted. Therefore, there are two types of admission: classified and conditionally classified.

  • 1. In classified status, students are fully admitted to the program, having fulfilled all necessary requirements. In addition to the BA, upper division English units and GPA requirements listed above, classified students also have achieved both of the following:
  • • A score in the 80th percentile in the verbal portion of the general test of the GRE and
  • • A passing score on the Writing Proficiency Exam (UDWPE)
  • 2. In conditionally classified status, students may begin graduate study as they work on fulfilling the GRE and UDWPE conditions required for classified status. However, students cannot go beyond 12 units of coursework until classified status is achieved. Note that the English Department’s requirements for classification are more stringent than the university’s requirements.
  • The UDWPE cannot be waived, but if a student passed this test or its equivalent as an undergraduate, he or she need not take it again. The GRE requirement will be waived if, at the time of entrance into the program, a student has a 3.60 GPA in upper division English and a 3.00 in the last 60 units. An alternative method of meeting the GRE score is available to a student who scores below the 80th percentile. If the student’s GRE score and GPA in the first 12 units of graduate work balance according to the following table, and any necessary faculty recommendations are secured, then the requirement will be considered fulfilled. All students who use the alternative method of meeting the GRE requirement must take the GRE at least once.

Minimum GPA GRE CSUN Faculty

(first 12 units) Verbal Score Recommendations

3.50 - 4.00 No minimum Not required

3.40 500 Not required

3.30 500 (2)

3.20 520 (2)

3.10 540 (2)

3.00 560 (2)

Requirements for the M.A. Degree in English

A minimum of 30 units of approved graduate work comprising Core Requirements and one option:

1. Core Requirements (12 Units)

  • ENGL 638 Seminar in Critical Approaches to Literature (3)
  • ENGL 604 Studies in the English Language (3)
Two courses in Literature at the 595 or 600-level (6)
Select one of the following options:

A. Literature Option (18 Units)

  • ENGL 601 Seminar in Scholarly Methods and Bibliography (3)

Three courses in Literature (9)

Two courses, one of which may be ENGL 698 Thesis in Literature or Criticism selected with the approval of the Graduate Advisor (6). The department may not offer 698 every term. The graduate program in literature is planning a third culminating experience option in addition to the thesis and comprehensive examination options.

Those not writing a thesis or electing to pursue the third option will select ENGL 697 Comprehensive Examination. The Comprehensive Examination does not carry unit weight toward the degree in the M.A. program. Therefore, students taking the exam must complete 30 units of coursework in addition to the exam. For regulations governing required registration for the examination, see the “Graduate Programs” section of the catalog.

B. Creative Writing Option (18 Units)

Applicants interested in the Creative Writing Option must first be admitted into the M.A. program in English and must submit a qualifying creative writing sample (Poetry: 10 complete poems; Fiction: 1 complete short story; Creative Nonfiction: 1 complete essay; Playwriting: 1 complete one act play, or 1 act from a full length play, or one complete performance text of at least ten minutes) to the Creative Writing Committee during the first semester of residency.

  • ENGL 652 Creative Writing Studies (3)
  • Three courses in creative writing (9)
  • One course selected with the approval of the Graduate Advisor (3)
  • ENGL 698 Creative Writing Thesis (consult Option Advisor) (3)

The department may not offer 698 every term. The graduate program in creative writing currently is undertaking programmatic changes intended to accommodate the specific culminating experience needs of graduate creative writing students.

C. Rhetoric And Composition Theory Option (18 Units)

Applicants interested in the Rhetoric and Composition Theory Option must first be admitted into the M.A. program in English and must submit a qualifying non-fiction writing sample (10 pages) during their first semester of residency.

  • ENGL 651 Rhetorical Theory and Composition (3)
  • Four courses in rhetoric or composition or study of language (12)
  • ENGL 698 Thesis in Rhetoric and Composition Theory
  • (Consult Option Advisor) (3). The department may not offer 698 every term. The graduate program in rhetoric and composition theory is planning a third culminating experience in addition to the thesis and comprehensive examination options.

Those not writing a thesis or electing to pursue the third option will select ENGL 697 Comprehensive Examination. The Comprehensive Examination does not carry unit weight toward the degree in the M.A. program. Therefore, students taking the exam must complete 30 units of coursework in addition to the exam. For regulations governing required registration for the examination, see the “Graduate Programs” section of the catalog.

Notes:

  • 1. In all options students may choose, with consent of the Graduate Advisor, two 400-level courses in English or outside the English Department that have been approved for graduate credit.
  • 2. Students may repeat the following courses once for credit:
  • ENGL 608 Seminar in Narrative Writing (3-3)
  • ENGL 609 Seminar in Poetry Writing (3-3)
  • ENGL 622 Seminar on Aspects of Poetry (3-3)
  • ENGL 623 Seminar in Studies in Prose Fiction (3-3)
  • Students may repeat the following courses twice for credit:
  • ENGL 620A-Z Seminar in Individual Authors (3-3-3)
  • ENGL 630A-M Seminar in Literary Periods (3-3-3)
  • ENGL 699A-C Independent Study (6 units maximum)1-3

Course List

Note that with the exception of the Subject Matter and FYI/JYI options, the English Department does not allow double-counting of upper division General Education courses within its major.
ENGL 090. Extemporaneous Expository Writing (3)
Preparatory: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Intensive practice in writing effective expository prose under test conditions. Primarily designed for students preparing to retake the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam (UDWPE). Credit for 090 does not guarantee passing the UDWPE. (Credit/No Credit Only)
ENGL 097. Developmental Reading (3)
Three units of University credit; no credit toward graduation. Students whose reading score on the English Placement Test assigns them to 097 are required to pass this course before taking ENGL 098. Individual tutoring is available in the Learning Resource Center. Intensive study of basic reading skills, focusing on the types of reading students will do in college. Class meets three hours per week. (Crosslisted with AAS, CHS, and PAS 097) (Credit/No Credit Only)
ENGL 098. Developmental Writing (3)
Three units of University credit; no credit toward graduation. Students whose score on the placement test assigns them to 098 are required to take this course. Individual tutoring is available in the Learning Resource Center. Intensive study of basic writing skills with focus on students’ own writing. Credit required to enroll in ENGL 155. (Crosslisted with AAS, CHS, and PAS 098) (Credit/No Credit Only) Class meets three hours per week.
ENGL 155. Approaches to University Writing (3)
Prerequisite: EPT score of 151 or better, or EPT and a grade of Credit in 097 and/or 098, if appropriate. Expository writing designed for freshmen and transfer students who have not taken freshman composition elsewhere. Emphasis on both content and form: to help students express ideas and convey information in writing 1) with logical reasoning and adequate factual support and 2) with clarity of purpose, organization, and language. Beyond these fundamental concerns the course encourages and assists students to develop a degree of grace and style which will make their writing not only clear and convincing, but interesting and readable. (Crosslisted with AAS 155, CAS 155, CHS 155, PAS 155) (Available for General Education, Analytical Reading/Expository Writing) (IC)
ENGL 196A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in English (1-3)
ENGL 205. Business Communication in its Rhetorical Contexts (3)
Prerequisites: CH S 155 or PAS 155 or ENGL 155 or AAS 155 or equivalent. Preparatory: CH S 151 or COMS 151 or PAS 151 or equivalent; COMP 100 or equivalent. Development of critical writing, thinking, research, and technology skills in the context of business. Through substantial writing and other work, students will hone their written, oral, and visual communication skills and their ability to find, synthesize, and make arguments based on primary and secondary sources. Emphasis on communication with a diverse audience and case studies about ethical issues common to the local and global business world. This course is required of students who have declared a major in Accountancy, Business Administration, Management, Marketing, Information Systems, or Finance. May also be taken as an elective by other students who wish to enhance their professional communication skills. Not available for students who have earned credit for BUS 105 or BUS 205.
ENGL 208. Creative Writing (3)
Preparatory: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Introductory workshop course in creative writing. Students have the option of concentrating on 1 of 3 modes: prose fiction, poetry, or drama. Part of the Writing Option in English. (Available for General Education, Arts and Humanities)
ENGL 250FE. Perspectives on English Studies for Teachers (3)
Introduces students to the issues of reading and writing in the context of examining their own first-year experiences with reading and writing and connects these experiences to the curricular content of ninth grade English classes and pupils. Students will meet with CSUN instructor 1.5 hours per week. A 20-hour field experience in a ninth grade English classroom is required. Required for FYI and JYI English Program.
ENGL 255. Introduction to Literature (3)
Preparatory: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Introductory study of the genres of imaginative literature--prose fiction, poetry, and drama--with special emphasis on the interrelationships between form and theme. The course will feature a specific cultural tradition (e.g., Western, Postcolonial, African American, etc.) to be chosen by the instructor. Critical writing is an integral part of the course. (Available for General Education, Arts and Humanities, and meets the lower division literature requirement for Liberal Studies majors)
ENGL 258. Major English Writers I (3)
Preparatory: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Study of works of major English writers from the Middle Ages to Samuel Johnson, with attention to literary movements and backgrounds. Critical writing required. (Available for General Education, Arts and Humanities)
ENGL 259. Major English Writers II (3)
Preparatory: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Study of works of major English writers, from Blake to the present, with attention to literary movements and backgrounds. Critical writing required. (Available for General Education, Arts and Humanities)
ENGL 275. Major American Writers (3)
Preparatory: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Study of the important works of a selected number of American writers from the colonial period to modern times. Critical writing required. (Available for General Education, Arts and Humanities)
ENGL 296A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in English (1-3)

Upper Division

ENGL 300. Contemporary Literature (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Preparatory: Upper Division standing. Not for credit in the English major and minor. Study and analysis of selected major works of fiction, poetry, and drama and major authors since approximately the end of World War II in England and America. Critical writing required. (Available for General Education, Arts and Humanities)
ENGL 301. Language and Linguistics (3)
Preparatory: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Introduction to linguistic science, its background, development, and relation to other fields of study; recent developments in the study of language. Linguistics and Language Study requirement of the English Subject Matter Program.
ENGL 302. Introduction to Modern Grammar (3)
Basic course in grammar, traditional, structural, and trans-formational; some applications of linguistics to the teaching of English and the language arts are suggested.
ENGL 303. Introduction to Grammar and Linguistics for Teachers (4)
Introduction to the study of human languages and to major scientific approaches in linguistics: phonetics (properties of sound), phonology (sound systems of particular languages), morphology (word formation processes), syntax (word order patterns), semantics (study of meaning), and language variation (including dialects and historical changes). Designed for students in the Liberal Studies Freshman ITEP Program, this course surveys current linguistic theories and focuses on those aspects of grammar expected to be taught as part of the English-Language Arts Content Standards for Grades K-5 as mandated by the California State Board of Education.
ENGL 305. Intermediate Expository Writing (3)
Preparatory: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Intermediate course in written expository writing includes a study of the style of competent writers and extends the writing skills acquired by students in the Freshman Composition course. Emphasis on developing writing that exhibits clarity, coherence, style, and a clear purpose. Provides preparation for the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam (UDWPE) and satisfies the writing requirement in the Liberal Studies major.
ENGL 306. Report Writing (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Approaches to writing scientific, technical, professional, business, or general-information reports and articles for various audiences and contexts. Emphasis on awareness of discursive practices of particular fields to achieve purpose, coherence, and effective style. Culminates with research project and presentation. (Available for General Education, Lifelong Learning.)
ENGL 308. Narrative Writing (3-3)
Preparatory: ENGL 208 or demonstrated proficiency. Intensive practice in narrative writing with emphasis on short fiction; analysis and criticism of students’ work as well as analysis of selected published writings. May be repeated once for credit.
ENGL 309. Verse Writing (3-3)
Preparatory: ENGL 208 or demonstrated proficiency. Intensive practice in writing poetry; analysis and criticism of students’ work as well as some critical study of published verse. May be repeated once for credit.
ENGL 310. Playwriting (3-3)
Preparatory: ENGL 208 or demonstrated proficiency. Intensive practice in writing drama for stage, radio, and television; analysis and criticism of students’ work, including lab production through college facilities. May be repeated once for credit.
ENGL 311. History of African-American Writing (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Preparatory: At least one university-level course in literature. Focus on the development of the major genres in African-American writing from the beginning to the present, relating them to the larger movements in American culture. Critical writing required. Information Competency course. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies) (IC)
ENGL 312. Literature and Film (3)
Study of selected literary works that have been made into films, as well as an exploration of the adapted films themselves and of the change in emphasis and meaning when literature is translated into or adapted to film.
ENGL 313. Studies in Popular Culture (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Cultural studies course focusing on the interpretation of American popular culture. Course methodology may include Marxist, psychoanalytic, semiotic, or culturally eclectic scholarly points of view. Designed for students who may want to enter the fields of entertainment or advertising, or future teachers who may want to use popular culture in their classrooms, this course will survey the products of popular culture as signifiers of larger cultural forces and realities. Available as an elective in all options of the major and minor. Information Competency course. (Available for General Education, Lifelong Learning) (IC)
ENGL 314. North American Indian Literature (3)
Preparatory: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Survey of North American Indian literatures, including traditional oral forms, autobiographies, and contemporary poetry and prose.
ENGL 316. Shakespeare (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Preparatory: Upper Division standing. Not for credit in the English major or minor. Introductory study of representative poems and plays. Attendance at performances and/or films required. Critical writing required. (Available for General Education, Arts and Humanities)
ENGL 333. Comics and Graphic Novels (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Study of comics, including comic strips, comic books, and graphic novels, from literary and cultural studies perspectives. Emphasis on both history and form, including image-text relationships. Topics may also include fan culture, particular genres of comics, and connections between comics and other forms of visual text. Critical writing required. (Available for General Education, Arts and Humanities)
ENGL 355. Writing About Literature (3)
Preparatory: Completion of the lower division writing requirement and two lower division English courses. Intensive study of the literary genres of poetry, prose fiction, and drama. Emphasis on written analysis of selected works in each genre. Development of criteria for responsible judgment.
ENGL 360. the English Bible As Literature (3)
Preparatory: Upper Division standing. Study of form, theme, and style in the King James Version of the Bible.
ENGL 363. Study of Poetry (3)
Preparatory: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Intensive study of representative poems in English from the Middle Ages to the present. Exercises in explication of the various modes of poetic expression. Development of criteria for responsible judgment. Emphasis on critical analysis of selected poems; critical writing required. Class activity is largely discussion.
ENGL 364. The Short Story (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Preparatory: Upper Division standing. Not for credit in the English major or minor. A study of the short story, beginning with careful examination of some classics in the genre, followed by analysis of more contemporary works. Not allowed for credit in the English major or minor. Critical writing required. (Available for General Education, Arts and Humanities)
ENGL 368. Gay Male Writers (3)
Preparatory: Completion of lower division writing requirement. Examines works in British and American literature that: a) were written by gay men, and b) portray the lives of gay individuals. Focusing primarily on texts written since the late 19th century, traces the development of gay male self-representation in poetry, novels, short fiction, drama, and nonfiction.
ENGL 369. Lesbian Writers (3)
Preparatory: Completion of lower division writing requirement. Primarily focuses on the work of lesbian writers of the 20th century. Using the approaches of current feminist literary theorists, explores the diversity and intersections of lesbian literary traditions. Examines the extent to which lesbian writers have followed and/or altered genre conventions in fiction and poetry.
ENGL 371. Issues in Jewish-American Writing (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Study of Jewish writing in America as it affects the relationship between Jewish issues and themes and American culture, based on the works of such authors as I. B. Singer, Roth, Bellow, Malamud, Cahan, Paley, Olsen, Shapiro, Ozick, and Potok. Critical writing required. Information Competency course. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies) (IC)
ENGL 372. Eroticism in Literature (3)
Study of selected literary works which focus on the erotic as a major theme. Emphasis on philosophical and psychological aspects of the erotic in literature and the relationship of the erotic to society and culture.
ENGL 392. Junior Honors Seminar I (3)
Preparatory: Admission to the Honors Program. May be taken in any sequence with ENGL 393. Introduction to literary history with emphasis on the role of tradition and influence.
ENGL 393. Junior Honors Seminar II (3)
Preparatory: Admission to the Honors Program. May be taken in any sequence with ENGL 392. Introduction to practical criticism through a study of critical methods and their application to various literary works, with some attention to bibliography and scholarly method.
ENGL 396A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in English (1-3)
ENGL 400. History of the English Language (3)
Developments in the English language from Old English through Middle English, Early Modern English, and Modern English. American English and its heritage. Influences from other languages as well as internal linguistic processes in English itself.
ENGL 405. Language Differences and Language Change (3)
Preparatory: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Study of how and why language changes, with particular emphasis on the history of English, social and geographical dialects, current English usage, and lexicography. Brief review of phonology and grammar is included for those students who need it. Available for Section C of the Multicultural Requirement for Credential Candidates.
ENGL 406. Advanced Expository Writing for Teachers (3)
Preparatory: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Required of candidates working for the single subject credential in English; an option for candidates in Liberal Studies working for the multiple subjects credential. Advanced course in written composition and recent composition theory extends the student’s writing skills, explores the kind of writing required of California public school students, and establishes criteria for the evaluation of writing at all levels.
ENGL 407. Composition and the Professions (3)
Preparatory: Demonstrated proficiency; instructor consent. Advanced composition, logical thinking, and coherent expression designed particularly for students who wish to use their writing and analytic skills in the professions of law or medicine, government or community services, business, industry, or non-teaching educational and research services.
ENGL 408. Advanced Narrative Writing (3-3)
Preparatory: ENGL 308. Continued practice in the writing of prose fiction, with a concentration on experimentation in style and structure. Analysis and criticism of students’ work. May be repeated once for credit.
ENGL 409. Advanced Verse Writing (3-3)
Preparatory: ENGL 309. Continued practice in the writing of poetry with emphasis on formal poetic patterns. Analysis and criticism of students’ work as well as study of selected published verse. May be repeated once for credit.
ENGL 410. Advanced Dramatic Writing (3-3)
Preparatory: ENGL 310. Continued practice in dramatic writing leading to the completion of a full length drama. Analysis and criticism of students’ work as well as study of selected plays. May be repeated once for credit.
ENGL 412. Literary Magazine (3)
Preparatory: Upper Division standing. Theoretical overview of literary publishing; practice in close reading and in the exercise of literary and aesthetic judgment; and editing and publishing of the Northridge Review, a literary magazine. May be repeated once with instructor’s consent. May be repeated once for credit.
ENGL 414. Chaucer (3)
Preparatory: six units of lower division literature courses or 3 units of lower division literature and ENGL 355. Study of The Canterbury Tales and other selected poems.
ENGL 416. Shakespeare: Selected Plays (3)
ENGL 416 and 417 may be taken separately or in any sequence. Close study of 3 to 5 plays.
ENGL 417. Shakespeare: A Survey (3)
ENGL 416 and 417 may be taken separately or in any sequence. Study of 8 to 15 of the major plays.
ENGL 419. English Drama 1660-1880 (3)
Study of significant plays in England, 1660-1880, with special emphasis on major dramatists such as Wycherley, Dryden, Congreve, Otway, and Sheridan.
ENGL 420. Milton (3)
Study of Paradise Lost, other poems, and selected prose.
ENGL 427. Drama From Ibsen to the Present (3)
Development of significant theater movements in Europe and America; intensive study of selected plays. (Crosslisted with FLIT 427)
ENGL 428. Children’s Literature (3)
Preparatory: One lower division course in literature. Study of form, content, and theme in children’s literature, classic and contemporary, from pre-school through 9th-grade level.
ENGL 429. Literature for Adolescents (3)
Critical analysis of selected literary works of interest to adolescents, including works commonly used in secondary schools (grades 7-12); development of principles for the evaluation of literature for adolescents.
ENGL 430. Literature and the Visual Arts (3)
Study of literature from the perspective of its relationships with the visual arts, including fields such as literary pictorialism, the sister arts tradition, inter-media stylistic, and book illustration.
ENGL 431. Images of Women in Literature (3)
Preparatory: Completion of 3 units of lower division literature. Study of the images of women in literature and criticism, primarily by women themselves. Emphasis on the diversity of contemporary portrayals and their traditional backgrounds.
ENGL 433. Women Authors (3)
Preparatory: six units of lower division literature courses or 3 units of lower division literature and ENGL 355. Study of literature (poetry and prose) by prominent English and American women authors from earliest times to the present.
ENGL 434. 19th Century Women Novelists (3)
Preparatory: six units of lower division literature courses or 3 units of lower division literature and ENGL 355. Study of selected novels by important 19th-century women novelists, both British and American, including such writers as Alcott, Austen, C. Brontë, E. Brontë, Chopin, Eliot, Gaskell, Gilman, and Stowe. Examines both text and context for each novel studied in order to suggest why these women chose to be writers, why they chose the subjects they did, and how their works have been received by readers.
ENGL 436. Major Critical Theories (3)
Study of major texts of literary criticism from Plato to the present. Emphasis on application of critical theories.
ENGL 438. Critical Approaches to Literature (3)
Application of basic topics of practical criticism –rhetorical, formal, contextual, psychological, and archetypal– to a selected core of literary texts. Emphasis on critical writing.
ENGL 443. English Literature of the Middle Ages (3)
Preparatory: six units of lower division literature courses or 3 units of lower division literature and ENGL 355. Study of the literature of England to 1500, including Beowulf and representative Old English secular and religious poems, and such Middle English authors as Chaucer, Langland, the Pearl Poet, Gower, and Malory, and such medieval genres as the romance, the lyric, the ballad, and the drama. Some works will be read in modern English versions.
ENGL 449. The English Renaissance (3)
Preparatory: six units of lower division literature courses or 3 units of lower division literature and ENGL 355. Study of the non-dramatic literature and of the culture of England from 1500 to 1603.
ENGL 452. 17th Century Literature (3)
Preparatory: six units of lower division literature courses or 3 units of lower division literature and ENGL 355. Study of the non-dramatic literature and of the culture of England from the death of Elizabeth I to the Glorious Revolution.
ENGL 455. Literacy, Rhetoric and Culture (3)
Study of current and past theories of literacy, including the nature of literacy itself; connections between rhetoric and literacy; the ways literacy is shared and used by individuals, families, and cultures; and the political, social, and personal ramifications of literacy. Core course for English Department minor in Writing and Rhetoric. Available for graduate credit.
ENGL 456. The Age of Enlightenment (3)
Preparatory: six units of lower division literature courses or 3 units of lower division literature and ENGL 355. Study of the literature and culture of England, 1660-1800. Emphasis on major authors such as Dryden, Pope, Swift, Montagu, Behn, and Johnson, with examples of the novel and the drama.
ENGL 457A-Z. Selected Topics in Creative Writing (3)
Prerequisite: English 308, 309, 310, or permission of instructor. Intensive consideration of a focused area of study as it proceeds from a literary or critical tradition that informs creative writing. Creative and critical writing required. Topics will change from semester to semester. May be repeated one time for credit.
ENGL 458. The Romantic Age (3)
Preparatory: six units of lower division literature courses or 3 units of lower division literature and ENGL 355. Study of the literature and culture of England during the Romantic period, with special emphasis on the major poets, including Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Keats, and Byron.
ENGL 459 A-Z. Selected Topics in Writing and Rhetoric (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Intensive study of a topic relevant to literacy, composition, or rhetoric. Analytic or critical writing required. Topics will change from semester to semester. May be repeated one time. Available for graduate credit.
ENGL 460. The Victorian Age (3)
Preparatory: six units of lower division literature courses or 3 units of lower division literature and ENGL 355. Study of the literature and culture of England, 1837-1901, with special emphasis on the major writers of the age, including Tennyson, Arnold, and Browning.
ENGL 461. Modern British Literature (3)
Preparatory: six units of lower division literature courses or 3 units of lower division literature and ENGL 355. Study of British Literature, 1900 to 1939, and of the cultural forces which helped shape it. Emphasis on major writers such as Yeats, Joyce, Lawrence, Woolf, and Shaw.
ENGL 462. Contemporary British Literature (3)
Preparatory: 6 units of lower-division literature and English 355. Study of British literature in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries (e.g. Stoppard, Beckett, Kureishi, Smith, Amis, Heaney, Adcock, McGuckian). The course will consider the historical and cultural forces currently shaping genres and ideas and may also discuss influences of mid-twentieth century writers.
ENGL 463A. Modern Poetry (3)
Intensive study and analysis of the poems of major English language authors between 1912-1955, including such writers as Yeats, Eliot, Pound, H. D., Crane, Jeffers, Toomer, L. Hughes, Lawrence, Auden, Moore, Stevens, Williams, and Cummings.
ENGL 463B. Contemporary Poetry (3)
Preparatory: six units of lower division literature courses or 3 units of lower division literature and ENGL 355. Intensive study and analysis of the poems of major English language authors since 1955, including such writers as Robert Lowell, Sylvia Plath, John Berryman, Adrienne Rich, Allen Ginsberg, James Wright, John Ashbery, Amiri Baraka, Maxine Kumin, Rita Dove, and Seamus Heaney.
ENGL 464. Theories of Poetry (3)
Intensive study of the theories and craft of poetry.
ENGL 465. Theories of Fiction (3)
Intensive study of the theories and craft of fiction.
ENGL 466. Major British Novelists I: 1700-1815 (3)
ENGL 466, 467, 468 may be taken separately or in any sequence. Study of selected major novels by authors such as Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Sterne, and Austen.
ENGL 467. Major British Novelists II: 1815-1900 (3)
ENGL 466, 467, 468 may be taken separately or in any sequence. Study of selected major novels by authors such as Scott, Dickens, C. Brontë, E. Brontë, Thackeray, George Eliot, Trollope, and Hardy.
ENGL 468. Major British Novelists III: 1900 to the Present (3)
ENGL 466, 467, 468 may be taken separately or in any sequence. Study of selected major novels by authors such as Conrad, Forster, Lawrence, Joyce, Murdoch, Bowen, and Woolf.
ENGL 470A-Z. Major Authors (3)
Preparatory: six units of lower division literature coursework or 3 units of lower division literature coursework and ENGL 355. Study in depth of a single author or a comparative study of two authors, such as Swift, Hawthorne, Woolf, Morrison/ Faulkner, Williams/ Lawrence. The author(s) studied will change from semester to semester.
ENGL 473. American Literature: 1607-1860 (3)
Preparatory: six units of lower division literature courses or 3 units of lower division literature and ENGL 355. Study of the literature and the culture of the colonial period, the early republic, and the romantic period.
ENGL 474. American Literature: 1860-1912 (3)
Preparatory: six units of lower division literature courses or 3 units of lower division literature and ENGL 355. Study of the literature and the culture of the age of realism.
ENGL 475. American Literature: 1912-1945 (3)
Preparatory: six units of lower division literature courses or 3 units of lower division literature and ENGL 355. Study of the literature and culture of earlier 20th century America from the poetic renaissance through World War II. Emphasis on major writers such as Frost, Hemingway, Eliot, Wharton, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, Stevens, Cather, Moore, and Porter.
ENGL 476. Contemporary American Literature (3)
Preparatory: six units of lower division literature courses or 3 units of lower division literature and ENGL 355. Study of the literature and culture of America from 1945 to the present. Emphasis on major writers such as Bellow, Albee, Lowell, Williams, Welty, Morrison, Rich, O’Connor, and Pynchon.
ENGL 477. Major American Novelists I: the 19th Century (3)
ENGL 477 and 478 may be taken separately or in any sequence. Study of selected works by major American writers such as Cooper, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, Chopin, and James.
ENGL 478. Major American Novelists II: the 20th Century (3)
ENGL 477 and 478 may be taken separately or in any sequence. Study of selected works by major American writers such as Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Cather, Wharton, Faulkner, McCullers, Bellow, Morrison, O’Connor, and Updike.
ENGL 483. European Literature: Modern Times (3)
Study of representative European works from 1700 to the present; consideration of their contribution to Western thought. (Crosslisted with FLIT 483)
ENGL 487. Latino/a Literatures of the Americas (3)
Preparatory: ENGL 275; 436. Study of selected works of Latina and/or Latino writers from both the U.S. and Latin America, as well as of issues raised by critics and theorists in the field. Analysis of primary texts will employ methods of contemporary literary criticism. Topic or theme selected by instructor.
ENGL 490. Senior Seminar in Narrative Writing (3)
Preparatory: Senior standing. Preparation of a collection of short stories or of a single longer work of narrative fiction. Students complete, revise, and supplement their work to produce a finished manuscript of narrative fiction.
ENGL 491. Senior Seminar in Verse Writing (3)
Preparatory: Senior standing. Preparation of a collection of poems or of a single long poem. Students complete, revise, and supplement their work to produce a finished manuscript of poetry.
ENGL 492A-Z. Senior Honors Seminar I (3-3)
Preparatory: Senior Honors standing. ENGL 492 and 493 may be taken in any sequence. Intensive study of a literary figure, age, movement, or problem. May be repeated once for credit.
ENGL 493A-Z. Senior Honors Seminar II (3-3)
Preparatory: Senior Honors standing. ENGL 492 and 493 may be taken in any sequence. Intensive study of a literary figure, age, movement, or problem. May be repeated once for credit.
ENGL 494IP. English Intern Program (3-3)
Preparatory: ENGL 407. Students are placed by the Faculty Supervisor with sponsoring organizations, where they work as writers approximately 10 hours per week. Specific duties are assigned by sponsors. Students compile a portfolio of writing done for the sponsor and a term report of the experience. May be repeated once for credit.
ENGL 494 TCE. High School Internship: Writing and the Classroom Experience (3)
Preparatory: completion of, or current enrollment in, at least one upper division writing course and consent of instructor. Interns are required to work for at least 10 hours per week with high school students at a high school site to develop and enhance writing skills. Interns are supervised on site by the high school English faculty and directed by the 494TCE instructor. Interns are also required to keep journals and are graded on assigned essays.
ENGL 495A-Z. Senior Seminar in Literature (3-3)
Preparatory: Senior-standing and either two lower division courses in literature or 3 units of lower division literature and ENGL 355. Intensive study of a major British or American author or of a literary theme or sub-genre. Reports and seminar papers required. Topics change from semester to semester. May be repeated once for credit.
ENGL 496A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in English (1-3)
ENGL 497. Honors Thesis (3)
Preparatory: Senior Honors standing. The writing of an Honors thesis in either American or English literature under the supervision of a member of the faculty. Requirements as to form are the same as those for the Master’s thesis; however, consult the Honors Advisor regarding programmatic changes.
ENGL 499A-C. Independent Study (1-3)
Preparatory: Upper Division standing, normally a 3.0 GPA in English, and prior approval of sponsoring instructor and Department Chair.

Graduate

Note that 300-level courses in English do not carry credit for the M.A. in English; a maximum of six units of 400-level courses in English may carry credit for the M.A. in English only if they are approved by the Graduate Advisor. Graduate standing is required as a prerequisite for enrollment in all 600-level courses.

ENGL 595A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in English (1-3)
Topics will be announced each semester in the Schedule of Classes.
ENGL 600AB. College Composition: Theory and Pedagogy (3)
600A and 600B restricted to Teaching Associates, or at the discretion of the composition Director. Study of theoretical and pedagogical issues that impact the teaching of writing at the college level. Review of current studies in rhetoric, composition, and literacy.
ENGL 601. Seminar in Scholarly Methods and Bibliography (3)
Study of traditional and electronic methods of scholarly research. Investigation and evaluation of major areas of bibliographic study, such as literature and “new historicism,” the editing of texts, and literary influence studies and intertextuality.
ENGL 604. Seminar in Language and Linguistics (3)
An introduction to linguistics for graduate students.
ENGL 605. Seminar in Descriptive Linguistics (3)
Discussion of the levels of analysis, phonology, morphology, and syntax from the viewpoint of such scholars as Saussure, Bloomfield, Sapir, Whorf, Harris, Hockett, et al.
ENGL 606. Principles of Interlanguage (3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 301 or equivalent, or 604. Basic principles of contrastive analysis, error analysis and language transfer as applied to processes and strategies used in learning additional languages. Focus on the acquisition of English as a second language.
ENGL 608. Seminar in Narrative Writing (3-3)
Prerequisite: Qualified standing in the graduate Creative Writing Option or instructor consent. Intensive practice in advanced writing and analysis of the short story and the novel. Course may be repeated once for credit. One enrollment in 608 or 609 may be used in the Rhetoric and Composition Theory option.
ENGL 609. Seminar in Poetry Writing (3-3)
Prerequisite: Qualified standing in the graduate Creative Writing Option or instructor consent. Intensive practice in the writing of poetry, with attention to both contemporary and historical techniques; analysis and criticism of students’ work. May be repeated once for credit. One enrollment in 608 or 609 may be used in the Rhetoric and Composition Theory option.
ENGL 610. Seminar in Syntax (3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 301 or equivalent, or 604. Preparatory: English 302 or LING 404. In depth study of current approaches to syntactic analysis.
ENGL 611. Seminar in Historical Linguistics (3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 301 or equivalent, or 400 or 405. Study of the principles of historical comparative methodology through changes in phonology, morphology, syntax, vocabulary, and semantics.
ENGL 612. Stylistics (3)
Contemporary theories of style with practice in examining stylistic choices in the language of literary and non-literary texts. Focus on the relationship between language form and discourse meaning. Comparative analysis of linguistic, rhetorical, and literary perspectives on style and their implications for students, writers and teachers of composition.
ENGL 617. Studies in Shakespeare (3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 417 or equivalent. Advanced study of several of Shakespeare’s works including formal, textual, or historical aspects. Topics will change from semester to semester.
ENGL 620A-Z. Seminar in Individual Authors (3-3-3)
Study in depth of 1 major British or American author, such as Swift, Hawthorne, or Woolf. The author studied will change from semester to semester.
ENGL 622. Seminar On Aspects of Poetry (3-3)
Intensive critical study of the province of poetry, providing opportunity for the scrutiny of individual poets as well as for concentration on the wider historical perspective.
ENGL 623. Seminar in Studies in Prose Fiction (3-3)
Seminar in the theory, forms, traditions, and techniques of prose fiction. Topics will vary from semester to semester.
ENGL 624. Studies in Dramatic Literature (3)
Advanced study in drama considered as literature, with special emphasis on historical developments and their relationship to literary periods and movements in other genres.
ENGL 630A-Z. Seminar in Literary Periods (3-3-3)
Study of a period of British or American literature with wide readings in a range of authors and their intellectual backgrounds.
ENGL 638. Seminar in Critical Approaches to Literature (3)
Study of major critical approaches to literature and their application to selected literary texts.
ENGL 650. 20th Century Rhetoric (3)
20th Century Rhetoric focuses on major rhetorical theories and their relationship to literary criticism, linguistics, and language philosophy; competing paradigms of the rhetoric of written composition; and implications of rhetorical theories for students and teachers of literature and composition.
ENGL 651. Rhetorical Theory and Composition (3)
Intense analysis of modern rhetorical principles with frequent writing. Concentration on writing for an audience and discovering and developing personal style.
ENGL 652. Creative Writing Studies (3)
Prerequisite: Qualified standing in the graduate creative writing option or instructor consent. Introduction to the theoretical, professional and institutional concerns of creative writers, especially in an academic context. Intensive practice in creative writing (multi-genre). Workshop format.
ENGL 653. Literary and Rhetorical Genre Theory (3)
Examination of scholarship concerned with genre, both the traditional concept of genre, which focuses on formal categories of literary texts, and the rhetorical notion of genre, which focuses on the rhetorical purpose and function of non-literary texts. Through extensive reading, class discussions, and research projects, students will explore the function of genre, the communities that genres serve, the relationship between literary and non-literary genres, the cultural elements in genre, the relationship between genre and power, and the ways in which genres are acquired.
ENGL 655. Styles and Forms of Professional Writing (3)
Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Introduction to professional writing in fiction and non-fictional prose. Writing practice on a short story, review, and essay; study of these forms. Emphasis on forming, revising, and editing in a workshop format.
ENGL 660. Writing and the Developmental Student (3)
Study of major issues in the developmental writing field of Composition Studies. Students examine the writing, reading and critical thinking processes and their implications for the developmental students, ESL and non-standard dialect issues, various classroom strategies and assessment procedures, and the political implications of developmental writing programs.
ENGL 661. Methods of Inquiry in Composition (3)
Introduction to the major modes of inquiry in composition both from a theoretical/philosophical perspective and from a research perspective. Hands-on engagement with bibliographical resources and major journals in the field will train students both to evaluate and to undertake appropriate research in the field.
ENGL 665. Reading-Writing Connections (3)
Preparatory: Prior or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 600A or instructor consent. Explores connections between reading and writing, work that has become a major research emphasis in literacy studies over the past 20 years. Addresses these issues from a theoretical point of view and from the perspective of training students to be able to use the academic and scholarly information in relevant teaching situations. Framework considers approaches to exploring connections between reading and writing as appropriate to literary studies, to composition studies, and to applied linguistics.
ENGL 685. Seminar in Contemporary World Literature (3)
Major trends in the literature of the West in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
ENGL 696A-C. Directed Graduate Research (1-3)
ENGL 697. Directed Comprehensive Studies (1-3)
ENGL 698. Thesis or Graduate Project (3)
ENGL 699A-C. Independent Study (1-6)
Prerequisite: At least 1 graduate course in English and Department Chair’s consent. Investigation of a significant problem in language or literature. Project selected in conference with sponsor.