Table of Contents

Educational Psychology and Counseling

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Michael D. Eisner College of Education

Staff

  • Maria King (Administrative Coordinator)
  • Salvador Topete (Graduate Secretary)

Faculty

  • Beverly Cabello
  • Stanley Charnofsky
  • Diane Gehart
  • Pete Goldschmidt
  • Adele Eskeles Gottfried
  • Charles Hanson
  • Gregory Jackson
  • Carolyn Jeffries
  • Doris Jones-Nicol
  • Wilda Laija-Rodriguez
  • Michael Laurent
  • Rie Rogers Mitchell
  • Alberto Restori
  • Carrie Rothstein-Fisch
  • Luis Rubalcava
  • Tovah Sands
  • Jonah Schlackman
  • Merril Simon

Emeritus Faculty

  • Michael Auer
  • Rose Bromwich
  • Marvin Chernoff
  • Elizabeth Crane
  • Robert Docter
  • Don Dorsey
  • George Ferrell
  • Janet Fish
  • W. Dean Mc Cafferty
  • Sarah Moskovitz
  • Bernard Nisenholz
  • Margaret Thompson
  • Allen Webb

Programs Offered

  • M.S. in Counseling with Options in:
  • Career Counseling
  • College Counseling and Student Services
  • Marriage and Family Therapy
  • School Counseling
  • School Psychology
  • M.A. in Education – Educational Psychology Option with concentrations in:
  • Development
  • Learning
  • and Instruction
  • Early Childhood Education

Mission

The Department of Educational Psychology and Counseling prepares students for highly effective, ethical, and satisfying careers as professional educators and counselors working with individuals, families, and groups in educational, organizational, and community settings. The aim of our programs is to reflect an ecological and developmental life-span approach to theory, research, and practice centered on the study and application of major concepts and skills from counseling, early childhood education, educational psychology, and psychological foundations of education. Department faculty is committed to continuous evaluation and improvement of our courses and programs.

Accreditation

The Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Education Programs (CACREP), a specialized accrediting body recognized by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA), has conferred accreditation upon the following program areas in the Department of Educational Psychology and Counseling: Career Counseling (M.S.); College Counseling and Student Services (M.S.); Marriage and Family Therapy (M.S.); and School Counseling (M.S.) The National Association of School Psychology (NASP) has conferred accreditation upon the School Psychology (M.S.) program. All programs are also accredited by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CCTC) and the National Council on the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE).

State Licensure

Students seeking state licensure as a marriage and family therapist must complete the 60-unit master’s degree in counseling, option in Marriage and Family Therapy, and 3,000 hours of fieldwork and internship prior to applying for the State examination. Students seeking licensure as an educational psychologist must complete requirements for the School Psychology credential, and subsequently meet additional fieldwork requirements. For additional information, contact program advisors.

Marriage and Family Therapy: Stanley Charnofsky

School Psychology: Shari Tarver-Behring, Doris Jones-Nicol, Wilda Laija-Rodriguez, Alberto Restori.

State Credential

Department programs lead to State credentials in Pupil Personnel Services in two areas: School Counseling or School Psychology. Students seeking one of these credentials through CSUN must complete course work equivalent to the master’s degree in counseling, option in either school counseling or school psychology, respectively, and hold a master’s degree. For additional information, consult this catalog, department website: (www.csun.edu/edpsy), graduate advisor, or program coordinators.

Careers

Graduates completing a master’s degree may qualify for private practice or positions in public schools, social agencies, community colleges and universities, business and industry, career development, marriage and family therapy, and related areas. With the completion of state requirements, students can receive a credential in pupil personnel services in either school counseling or school psychology and/or a license as a marriage and family therapist or an educational psychologist.

Academic Advisement

Information for students interested in department programs is available by accessing the website or by calling or visiting the graduate advisor and/or department office. Students admitted to a master’s degree, certificate, or credential program should contact program coordinators for advisement. In addition, first year practicum instructors serve as advisors for students in all the master’s degree programs in counseling.

Graduate Advisor’s Office: ED 1223

Graduate Advisor: Todd Wolfe

(818) 677-5719

Graduate Coordinator: Merril Simon

Program Advisors: Career Counseling: Greg Jackson

College Counseling and Student Services: Merril Simon,

Rie Rogers Mitchell

Development, Learning, and Instruction: Adele Gottfried,

Carolyn Jeffries, Pete Goldschmidt

Early Childhood Education: Carrie Rothstein-Fisch

Marriage and Family Therapy: Stanley Charnofsky, Luis Rubalcava, Michael Laurent, Diane Gehart

School Counseling: Charles Hanson, Tovah Sands

School Psychology: Doris Jones-Nicol, Wilda Laija-Rodriguez,

Alberto Restori

Student Learning Outcomes of the Graduate Program

To fulfill the department mission, faculty engages in university and professional activities to develop and provide undergraduate and graduate programs for the preparation of professionals. At the conclusion of their program of study, students should be able to:

  • 1. Develop and apply expertise in their fields of study.
  • 2. Think critically and engage in reflective
  • ethical
  • and legal practice throughout their education and professional lives.
  • 3. Develop empathic
  • respectful
  • and congruent interpersonal skills and abilities to work successfully with groups and individuals from diverse backgrounds in educational
  • community
  • and mental health settings.
  • 4. Communicate effectively using oral
  • written
  • listening
  • and non-verbal attending and observational skills.
  • 5. Become information competent scholars and researchers capable of utilizing current technology in work environments while engaging in and disseminating creative
  • empirical
  • and applied research studies and program evaluations.
  • 6. Collaborate skillfully and respectfully as leaders
  • consultants
  • and team members in a variety of settings.
  • 7. Develop skills necessary to assess and evaluate individuals and groups
  • and to utilize current technology in work environments.
  • 8. Maintain a multicultural and global perspective
  • emphasizing social justice
  • gender and educational equity
  • access
  • and support.
  • 9. View their roles as preventative
  • educative
  • and therapeutic in promoting well-being
  • healthy relationships
  • academic success
  • and career mastery.
  • 10. Provide service through a wide variety of field-based partnerships informed by theory
  • research
  • and practice.
  • 11. Act as advocates with initiative
  • perception
  • and vision to lead and transform the practices and policies of those who provide services to individuals
  • families
  • schools
  • organizations
  • community
  • and policymakers.
  • 12. Pursue lifelong professional and personal development through such mediums as continuing education
  • information
  • technology
  • psychological counseling
  • participation and leadership in professional organizations
  • and doctoral study.

University Certificate Programs

In addition to M.A. and M.S. degree programs, the department offers five certificate programs: 1. Certificate in Career Development or Career Education and Counseling, 2. Certificate in College Counseling and Student Services, 3. Infant-Toddler-Family Mental Health Post B.A. Certificate, 4. Certificate in Instructional Design and Adult Development and, 5. Certificate in Parent-Child Specialization/Consultation. Contact the Program Coordinators for more information.

Admission Requirements for Classified Standing in Department Programs

  • 1. Complete University application and requirements:
  • a. Have earned a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university.
  • b. Have been in good standing at the last institution attended.
  • c. Have at least a 2.5 grade point average (GPA) in last 60 semester/ 90 quarter units attempted.
  • d. If cumulative undergraduate GPA is less than 3.0
  • score at or above the 50th percentile on one of the three sections of the aptitude test of the Graduate Record Examination
  • [i.e.
  • verbal
  • quantitative
  • or analytical or the Miller Analogies Test (MAT). (Except for applicants to the school psychology program
  • who are all required to take the GRE
  • applicants to other department programs with a cumulative undergraduate GPA of 3.0 or above do not have to take the GRE or MAT).
  • e. Pass Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam.
  • 2. Complete Department application for admission to graduate programs.
  • a. Submit two recommendations
  • either as letters or on departmental form.
  • b. Participate in an admission’s interview.
  • c. Be accepted by departmental Student Affairs Committee.
  • 3. Complete required prerequisite courses with a grade of “B-” or better.

Requirements for the Master of Science Degree in Counseling

The Master of Science (M.S.) in Counseling offers five options: 1) Career Counseling, 2) College Counseling and Student Services, 3) Marriage and Family Therapy, 4) School Counseling, and 5) School Psychology. Students must take prerequisite courses before formal admittance to a master’s degree program. Only students admitted to a Master of Science degree program may take classes in that program.

1. Career Counseling Option:

This option within the Master of Science (M.S.) in Counseling offers graduate-level training in career counseling theory; career resources and program development; approaches to developing organizational based career development programs; consulting; individual and group career assessment; ethical and legal issues; and the career development of special populations. These areas have been identified by the National Career Development Association (NCDA) as essential competency areas for individuals to qualify for national certifications as a Master Career Counselor (MCC) [www.ncda.org]. Graduates are eligible to take the National Counselor’s Examination (NCE) in order to qualify for certification as a National Certified Counselor (NCC) [www.nbcc.org]. As an alternative, graduates may choose to pursue the certification as a Registered Professional Counselor (RCC) and a Registered Professional Career Counselor (RPCC) through the California Registry for Professional counselors and Paraprofessionals [california-registry.org]. Graduates may also choose to pursue certification as a Master Career Counselor through the National Career Development Association. For those graduates who have an interest in preparing for a clinical practice as a psychotherapist, the option of becoming a Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor (LPCC) is available. Graduates preparing to be licensed will have to complete additional coursework beyond the career counseling coursework AND additional clinical fieldwork/internship and a state examination. Graduates of the program will be prepared for employment as career counselors in the following settings: education (community colleges, colleges, and universities); business, industry, and government; community-based agencies and organizations; career counseling/consulting firms; and private practice as a career counselor. This program meets the accreditation standards of and is approved by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP).

Prerequisites (9 Units)

  • EPC 430 Development and Learning in Early Childhood Education (3)
  • or EPC 612 Advanced Study in Child/Adolescent Development (3)
  • EPC 451 Fundamentals of Counseling and Guidance (3)
  • EPC 600 Educational Statistics for Research and Measurement (3)

(Equivalent courses may be substituted for prerequisites.)

1. Core Program (21 Units)

  • EPC 601 Individual and Group Assessment.(3)
  • EPC 602 Research Principles (3)
  • EPC 643 Counseling in Cross-Cultural Settings (3)
  • EPC 655 Seminar in Counseling Theory and Practice (3)
  • EPC 657A Seminar in Career Counseling Theory (3)
  • EPC 659A Counseling Practicum: Communication (3)
  • EPC 659B Counseling Practicum: Skills (3)

2. Option (31 Units)

  • EPC 609 Human Development: Life Span Perspective (3)
  • EPC 607 Motivation in Learning and Development (3)
  • EPC 653 Measurement for School and Career Counseling (3)
  • EPC 657B Seminar in Career Counseling Resources (3)
  • EPC 658 Group Counseling (3)
  • EPC 658L Group Counseling Lab. (1)
  • EPC 659C/D Fieldwork in Career Counseling (1-6)
  • EPC 660 Counseling for Career Adjustment and Change (3)
  • EPC 662 Current Issues in Career Education and Counseling (3)
  • or SPED 622 Career Education for Learners with Special Needs (3)
  • EPC 671 Law and Ethics (3)
  • MGT 620 Behavior in Organizations (3) or SOC 400 Organizational Analysis (3)

3. Electives (0-2 Units) (Electives approved by Program Coordinator)

4. Culminating Experience (3-6 Units)

  • EPC 697 Comprehensive Exam (3)
  • or EPC 698C Thesis/Graduate Project (3-6)
Suggested Sequence of Courses by Semester is:
  • Semester 1: EPC 601
  • 655
  • 657A 659A
  • Semester 2: EPC 643
  • 653
  • 657B 659B
  • Semester 3: EPC 609
  • 658/658L
  • 659C
  • MGT 620 or SOC 400
  • Semester 4: EPC 602
  • 607
  • 659D
  • 662 or SPED 622
  • Semester 5: EPC 660
  • 697 or 698C
  • Total Units Required for the Degree
  • 60

2. College Counseling and Student Services(CCSS)

The Master of Science (M.S.) in Counseling with an option in CCSS is a full-time program designed to prepare students for career opportunities in higher education with particular emphasis on positions serving university and community college students on urban campuses. Special attention is given to working with diverse student populations, including returning, historically underrepresented, and disabled students. This program is designed for two types of students: (1) for those individuals who desire training for entry level positions in student affairs, and (2) for those who are already experienced professionals in student affairs and wish to increase their theoretical background and range of experience. This program meets the accreditation standards of and is approved by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP). Graduates are eligible to take the National Counselor’s Examination (NCE) in order to qualify for certification as a National Certified Counselor (NCC) [www.nbcc.org].

Prerequisites (12 Units)

  • EPC 430 Development and Learning in Early Childhood Education (3)
  • PSY 310 Behavior Disorders (3)
  • or EPC 612 Advanced Study in Child and Adolescent Development (3)
  • EPC 451 Fundamentals of Counseling and Guidance (3)
  • EPC 600 Educational Statistics for Research and Measurement (3)

(Equivalent courses may be substituted for prerequisites.)

1. Core Program (21 Units)

  • EPC 601 Individual and Group Assessment (3)
  • EPC 602 Research Principles (3)
  • EPC 643 Counseling in Cross-Culture Settings (3)
  • EPC 655 Seminar in Counseling Theory and Practice (3)
  • EPC 657A Seminar in Career Counseling Theory (3)
  • EPC 659A Counseling Practicum: Communication (3)
  • EPC 659B Counseling Practicum: Skills (3)

2. Option (20 Units)

  • EPC 695S Capstone: College Counseling and Student Services (3)
  • EPC 606 Seminar in Adult Development (3)
  • or EPC 609 Human Development: A Life-Span Perspective (3)
  • EPC 620 College Counseling and Student Services Profession (3)
  • EPC 622 American College Student and Campus Environment (3)
  • EPC 659JB Fieldwork in CCSS (2)
  • EPC 659JC Fieldwork in CCSS (3)
  • EPC 659JK Fieldwork in CCSS (3)

3. Electives (1-6 Units) (Electives approved by Program Coordinator)

4. Culminating Experience ( 6 Units)

  • EPC 696 Directed Graduate Research (3)
  • EPC 697 Comprehensive Exam (3)
  • or EPC 698C Thesis/Graduate Project. (3)
Suggested Sequence of Courses by Semester:
  • Summer 1: EPC 657A
  • 671
  • Semester 1: EPC 622
  • 655
  • 659A
  • 659JB
  • Semester 2: EPC 602
  • 620
  • 643
  • 659B
  • Summer 2: EPC 609
  • 658/L
  • Elective
  • Semester 3: EPC 601
  • 659JC
  • 696
  • Semester 4: EPC 659KC
  • 695S
  • Elective
  • 697 or 698C
  • Total Units Required for Degree
  • 60

3. Marriage and Family Therapy Option

This option within the Master of Science (M.S.) in Counseling is an approved program and provides students with competency in the content areas required by the State Board of Behavioral Science. Upon completion of coursework and being awarded the degree, students are eligible to apply to the State Board for internship registration when endorsed by an officer of the University. Following completion of 3,000 hours of supervised field experience and successful passage of examinations administered by the State Board, candidates are awarded a license as a Marriage and Family Therapist by the State. Additionally, the CSUN program meets the accreditation standards of and is approved by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP). Graduates are eligible to take the National Counselor’s Examination (NCE) in order to qualify for certification as a National Certified Counselor (NCC) [www.nbcc.org].

Prerequisites (9 Units)

  • EPC 430 Development and Learning in Early Childhood Education (3)
  • or EPC 612 Advanced Study in Child and Adolescent Development (3)
  • EPC 451 Fundamentals of Counseling and Guidance (3)
  • EPC 600 Educational Statistics for Research and Measurement (3)
  • PSY 310 Behavior Disorders (3)
  • (Equivalent courses may be substituted for prerequisites.)

1. Core Program (21 Units)

  • EPC 601 Individual and Group Assessment (3)
  • EPC 602 Research Principles (3)
  • EPC 643 Counseling in Cross-Cultural Settings (3)
  • EPC 655 Seminar in Counseling Theory and Practice (3)
  • EPC 657A Seminar in Career Counseling Theory (3)
  • EPC 659A Counseling Practicum: Communication (3)
  • EPC 659B Counseling Practicum: Skills (3)

2. Option (36 Units)

  • FCS 441 Human Sexuality (3)
  • or SOC 456 Proseminar on Sexual Dysfunction (3)
  • EPC 609 Human Development- Life Span Perspective (3)
  • EPC 656 Seminar in Child and Adolescent Counseling (3)
  • EPC 658 Group Counseling (3)
  • EPC 658L Group Counseling Lab. (1)
  • EPC 659C/D Fieldwork in Counseling Services. (1-6)
  • EPC 670 Family Counseling (3)
  • EPC 671 Law and Ethics (3)
  • EPC 675 Counseling and Chemical Dependency (3)
  • EPC 677 Counseling Couples in Relationships (3)
  • EPC 678 Psychopharmacology. (2)
  • EPC 695B* Advanced Behavior Disorders for Counselors (3)
  • or PSY 610* Advanced Behavior Disorders (3)

*EPC 695B and PSY 610 require the prerequisite PSY 310 or equivalent 3 units

3. Culminating experience (3-6 Units)

  • EPC 697 Comprehensive Exam (3)
  • or EPC 698C Thesis/Graduate Project (3-6)
Suggested Course Sequence by Semester- CSUN
  • Semester 1: EPC 601
  • 609 655
  • 659A
  • Semester 2: EPC 643
  • 659B
  • 670
  • 671
  • Semester 3: EPC 602
  • 658/658L
  • 659C
  • 695B or PSY 610
  • Semester 4: EPC 656
  • 657/A
  • 659D
  • 670
  • FCS 441 or SOC 456
  • Semester 5: EPC 675
  • 677
  • 678
  • 697 or 698C
  • Semester 6: EPC 698C
  • if needed to complete thesis/project
Suggested Course Sequence for Part-time Students
  • Semester 1: EPC 655
  • 659A
  • Semester 2: EPC 643
  • 659B
  • Summer: EPC 609
  • 671
  • Semester 3: EPC 658
  • 658L
  • 659C
  • Semester 4: EPC 656
  • 659D
  • Summer: EPC 601
  • 670
  • Semester 5: EPC 602
  • 695B
  • Semester 6: SOC 456 or FES 441
  • EPC 678
  • 697 or 698
  • Summer: EPC 657A
  • 675
  • Semester 7: EPC 677
  • 697 or 698
  • Total Units Required for the Degree
  • 63-66

4. School counseling

The Master of Science (M.S.) degree in Counseling with an option in School Counseling is designed to prepare school counselors for work in K-12 public schools. The program is driven by a vision for counselors who can develop comprehensive, reality-based school counseling programs that promote educational equity and high academic achievement for all students. Program courses are integrated with school-based experiences and activities that prepare counselors to address the personal, social, career, and academic development of K-12 students. The program meets the accreditation standards of and is approved by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP). Graduates receive the Pupil Personnel Services Credential in School Counseling and are eligible to take the National Counselor’s Examination (NCE) in order to qualify for certification as a National Certified Counselor (NCC) [www.nbcc.org].

Prerequisites (9 Units)

  • EPC 314 Psychological Foundations of Education (3)
  • or EPC 430 Development and Learning in Early Childhood Education (3)
  • EPC 451 Fundamentals of Counseling and Guidance (3)
  • EPC 600 Educational Statistics for Research and Measurement (3)
  • (Equivalent courses may be substituted for prerequisites)

1. Core Program (18 Units)

  • EPC 602 Research Principles (3)
  • EPC 605 Advanced Psychological Foundations of Education (3)
  • EPC 643 Counseling in Cross-Cultural Settings (3)
  • EPC 655 Seminar in Counseling Theory and Practice (3)
  • EPC 659A Counseling Practicum: Communication (3)
  • EPC 659B Counseling Practicum: Skills (3)

2. Option (34 Units)

  • SPED 400 Introduction to Special Education (3)
  • EPC 648 Consultation with Parents
  • Teachers and Other Human Service Professionals (3)
  • EPC 658 Group Counseling (3)
  • EPC 658L Group Counseling Lab (1)
  • EPC 659C/D Fieldwork in School Counseling (1-6)
  • EPC 682 Foundations of School Counseling (3)
  • EPC 683 Collaborations with Families in Educational Settings (3)
  • EPC 684 Educational Program Evaluation and Assessment (3)
  • EPC 687 Career Guidance
  • College Selection and Technology in School Settings (3)
  • EPC 688 Measurement and Assessment in School Settings (3)
  • EPC 689 Leadership in School Counseling (3)

3. Culminating experience (3 Units)

  • EPC 698C Thesis/Graduate Project (3)
  • (EPC 698C may be taken an additional semester)
Suggested Course Sequence By Semester:
  • Summer: EPC 682
  • Semester 1: EPC 605
  • 643
  • 655
  • 659A
  • Semester 2: EPC 602 658/658L
  • 659B
  • 683
  • Summer: SPED 400
  • Semester 3: EPC 648
  • 659C
  • 684
  • 687
  • Semester 4: EPC 659D
  • 688
  • 689 698C
  • Semester 5: If needed for conclusion of Culminating Experience
  • Total Units Required for the Degree
  • 55

5. School Psychology

This option within the Master of Science (M.S.) in Counseling prepares school psychologists for careers within school-based teams to help all children, including those of linguistically and cultural diverse backgrounds, attain academic and social success. Students attain skills in consultation, assessment, and intervention, including counseling. Working at both the individual and systems level of service delivery, students develop the skills to facilitate collaboration among families, schools, and communities. They creatively use evaluation methods and culturally compatible solutions to dissolve barriers that impede the learning process. Through personal and educational development in the program, graduates become competent professionals, lifelong learners, innovators, and leaders in the field. On completion of the program, the student applies for the Advanced Pupil Personnel Services Credential: School Psychology Credential.

Prerequisites (9 Units)

  • EPC 314 or 314BL Psychological Foundations (3)
  • (Waived for applicants who have a teaching credential)
  • EPC 430 Development and Learning in Early Childhood Education (3)
  • or EPC 612 Advanced Study in Child and Adolescent Development (3)
  • PSY 313/L Developmental Psychology and Lab (3/1)
  • EPC 451 Fundamentals of Counseling and Guidance (3)
  • EPC 600 Educational Statistics for Research and Measurement (3)
  • or PSY 320/L Statistical Methods in Psychological Research and Lab (3/1)
  • or PSY 420/L Advanced Statistical Methods and Lab (3/1)
  • (Equivalent courses may be substituted for prerequisites)

1. Core Program (18 Units)

  • EPC 601 Individual and Group Assessment (3)
  • EPC 602 Research Principles (3)
  • EPC 643 Counseling in Cross-Cultural Settings (3)
  • EPC 655 Seminar in Counseling Theory and Practice (3)
  • EPC 659A Counseling Practicum: Communication (3)
  • EPC 659B Counseling Practicum: Skills (3)

2. Option (49 Units)

  • EPC 611 Seminar in Educational Psychology (3)
  • EPC 647 Assessment and Intervention with Child
  • and Family (3)
  • EPC 659E/F Fieldwork in School Psychology (1-6)
  • EPC 659G/H Internship in School Psychology (1-6)
  • EPC 661 Multi-Systemic Behavioral Intervention (3)
  • EPC 663A/L Clinical and Psychometrics Assessment Techniques (3/2)
  • EPC 663B/L Clinical and Psychometrics Assessment Techniques (3/2)
  • EPC 664 Neurodevelopmental
  • Emotional and Behavior Disorders (3)
  • EPC 665 School-Based Counseling of Children and Teens (3)
  • EPC 667 Introduction to School Psychology (3)
  • EPC 680 Seminar in School Psychology (3)
  • EPC 684 Educational Program Evaluation and Assessment (3)
  • SPED 610 Program Planning for Exceptional Children and Youth (3)
  • Total Units Required for the Credential
  • 67

Curriculum for the Master of Arts in Education with an Option in Educational Psychology: The Master of Arts (M.A.) in Education with an option in Educational Psychology offers two emphases: 1) Early Childhood Education, and 2) Development, Learning and Instruction. Students must take prerequisite courses before formal admittance to a master’s program.

1. Educational Psychology: Early Childhood Education Option:

The specific objectives of the Master of Arts in Education with an option in Educational Psychology and a concentration in Early Childhood Education (ECE) are:

  • A. To prepare students to assume leadership positions in early childhood care and education in a variety of educational
  • health and mental health settings institutions concerned with children from the prenatal stage through age eight. Academic career choices of students selecting this option typically include:
  • 1. instructor of child development courses in community colleges;
  • 2. parent educator in public adult education or in a variety of private settings;
  • 3. specialist working with hospitalized children and in programs serving families with high risk infants and young children;
  • 4. coordinator of community program services for young children and their families;
  • 5. lead teacher
  • supervisor
  • or director of programs; and
  • 6. child advocate working in various social policy agencies.
  • B. To prepare students to enter doctoral programs in early childhood education with a view to teaching at a university level
  • conducting research in child development
  • planning
  • and administering programs
  • or developing public policy.
  • C. To provide students with knowledge of child development
  • adult-child interaction
  • cultural and language diversity
  • biological and environmental factors influencing families and their young children
  • and community staff-family collaborations.

This program is aligned with the Professional Standards for Advanced Students (master’s level) as specified by the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) in concert with the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE).

Students must complete these courses with the grade of “B” or better in order to make satisfactory progress in the program. Students earning less than a grade of “B,” will be required to meet with their faculty advisor to determine if they may continue in the program.

Prerequisites (6 Units)

Admission to the University and to the Program.

  • EPC 430 Development and Learning in Early Childhood Education (3)
  • EPC 600 Educational Statistics for Research and Measurement (3)
  • (Equivalent courses may be substituted for prerequisites.)

1. Core Program (21 units)

  • EPC 602 Research Principles (3)
  • EPC 609 Human Development
  • A Lifespan Perspective (3)
  • EPC 632 Issues
  • Theories and Current Practices in Early Childhood Education (3)
  • EPC 635 Foundations of Developmental Curriculum for Early Childhood (3)
  • EPC 639C Fieldwork in Early Childhood (3)
  • EPC 683 Collaboration with Families in Educational Settings (3)
  • EPC 668 Partnerships for Excellence in Early Childhood Education (3)
  • or EPC 642 Assessment and Evaluation in Early Childhood Education (3)

2. Electives (6 units)

  • Electives must be approved by an Early Childhood Education Program Coordinator

3. Culminating Experience (3-6 units)

  • EPC 697 Comprehensive Exam.3-6
  • or EPC 698 Thesis/Graduate Project .3-6
  • Suggested Course Sequence by Semester:
  • Semester 1: EPC 639C
  • EPC 632
  • Semester 2: EPC 635
  • elective
  • EPC 602
  • Semester 3: EPC 683
  • EPC 609
  • elective
  • Semester 4: EPC 688 or EPC 642
  • and either 697 or 698
  • Semester 5: EPC 697 or 698 if needed
  • Electives – Concentrations of Study (optional)
  • Students are not required to have a sub-specialization in their choice of electives
  • but areas of sub-specialties have been identified as one way to fulfill electives
  • depending upon a student’s area of interest.
  • Cognition and Language – Electives selected from: EPC 605
  • 607
  • 634 This sub-specialty is ideal form masters students who may be teaching at the elementary school level or for those with a special interest in learning
  • motivation or language
  • Infant-Toddler-Family Mental Health – Electives selected from:
  • EPC 630
  • 631
  • 633
  • 636
  • 644 The Infant-Toddler-Family Mental Health Certificate provides recognition for a specialized course of study to enhance knowledge of the most recent research and practice related to working with very young children and their families in a variety of educational and health-related settings. The full certificate requires 5 courses
  • of which two courses can be completed as electives in the Masters in Early Childhood Education. Three additional courses are also required to earn the Certificate. This is not a license
  • credential
  • or other government-recognized certificate.

2. Educational Psychology: Development, Learning And Instruction Concentration

  • The Development
  • Learning and Instruction (DLI) Program offers graduate study of theory
  • research
  • and applications in human life-span development
  • motivation
  • learning
  • instruction
  • development
  • teaching processes
  • affective processes
  • individual and group differences
  • assessment
  • evaluation
  • and instructional design. The specific objectives of the M.A. in Education Degree Program with specialization in Educational Psychology/ Development
  • Learning and Instruction are stated as follows:
  • a. To prepare students according to current academic demands for entry into doctoral programs in educational psychology and education.
  • b. To offer preservice and inservice teachers the opportunity to improve their teaching through in depth study of the psychology of learning as well as by learning how to do research about students
  • family
  • teacher
  • school
  • community
  • and teaching-instruction variables.
The degree prepares candidates for the following career goals:
  1. 1. establish a foundation for doctoral study in a variety of fields
  2. 2. become a more effective classroom teacher or mentor
  3. 3. design instructional materials
  4. 4. conduct educational research and program assessment
  5. 5. open a private
  6. educationally-related business
  7. 6. become an educational consultant
  8. 7. work in businesses with an educational or training dimension
  9. 8. evaluate educational programs in various settings such as business, education or government

Prerequisites for the M.A. Program in Development, Learning, and Instruction:

A course in Psychological Foundations, which may be any of the following (3 units):
  • EPC 314 Psychological Foundations (3)
  • EPC 315 Psychological Foundations of Learning and Teaching (3)
  • EPC 420 Educational Psychology of Adolescence (3)
  • EPC 500 Fundamentals for Beginning Teachers (3)
  • and EPC 600 Educational Statistics for Research and Measurements (3)
  • and Admission to the University and Admission to the Program (3 units)

The Admission Requirements for Classified Standing in all Degrees are:

  • 1. Completion of application and meeting admissions requirements of the University. (Application available at the Admissions Office.) Requirements include:
  • a. Acceptable score on the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) or the Miller Analogies Test (MAT)if undergraduate GPA is below 3.0.
  • b. Successfully pass the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam.
  • c. A Bachelors degree from an accredited college or university.
  • 2. Completion of application for admission to the Department graduate programs. See program advisors for specific details. This includes:
  • a. Two letters of recommendation
  • b. An admission interview
  • c. Approval by the Department Student Affairs Committee
  • d. Satisfactory completion of prerequisite courses pertinent to the specialization selected
  • with a grade of B-or better

Basic Program for the M.A. in Education with a specialization in Development, Learning, and Instruction:

1. Required Courses (18 units):

  • EPC 602 Research Principles (3)
  • EPC 605 Advanced Psychological Foundations of Education (3)
  • EPC 607 Motivation in Learning and Development:
  • Theories and Applications in Educational Psychology (3)
  • EPC 609 Human Development: Life-Span Perspective (3)
  • EPC 615 Introduction to Instructional Design (3)
  • EPC 695D Seminar in Selected Studies: Development
  • Learning
  • and Instruction (3)

2. Elective Courses (9 units):

Electives must be chosen in consultation with and must be approved by the Program Coordinator. Students may choose courses covering the following: Human Development Statistics, Measurement, Evaluation Cognition, Instructional Design, and Teaching (Electives are developed in concert with your advisor and are Individualized for each student).

3. Culminating Experience (3 units):

  • EPC 697 Comprehensive Exam (3)
  • or EPC 698C Thesis/Graduate Project (3); may be taken for an additional 3 units if the culminating activity requires an additional term to complete.
  • Note: A total of 30 units are required for the M.A. degree.

All programs must be approved by the program coordinator. This listing is provided for information purposes only, is subject to change without notice, and is not guaranteed to be correct. The student should consult the university catalog and the program coordinator for further details and course descriptions.

Course List

EPC 314. Psychological Foundations, K-12 (3)
Fulfills the requirement for the CLAD program. Study of the theory and research of educational psychology to learn principles that are basic to the successful teaching of students of all ages, backgrounds, and needs. These principles of educational psychology form a foundation of knowledge about teaching that is built upon in subsequent courses in teaching methods and practice teaching. Topics studied include learning, motivation, development (cognitive, language, socio-emotional, physical, and moral), cognition, assessment, instruction, classroom management, and individual and group differences (language, ability, ethnicity, social class, gender, exceptionality, and family pattern). Implications for teaching students from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds are considered throughout the course. During the course, students are required to spend a minimum of 20 hours participating and/or observing in public schools.
EPC 314BL. Psychological Foundations, K-12 (3)
(Bilingual Emphasis) (Fulfills the requirement for the BCLAD, Spanish Emphasis Program) Prerequisite: Admission to credential program. Same course as EPC 314 except the course is taught in Spanish and is designed primarily for Single and Multiple Subjects-Bilingual Emphasis Credential. Requires a minimum of 20 hours of participation in public schools.
EPC 315. Psychological Foundations of Learning and Teaching (3)
Study of the theory and research of educational psychology to backgrounds, and needs. These principles of educational psychology form a foundation of knowledge about teaching that is built upon in subsequent courses in teaching methods and practice teaching. Topics studied include learning, motivation, development (cognitive, language, socio-emotional, physical and moral) and their relationship to learning and instruction, cognition, assessment, classroom management, and individual and group differences in learning. Implications for teaching students from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, as well as students with special needs, are considered throughout the course. Students begin to develop a professional portfolio which course, students are required to spend a minimum of 20 hours participating and/or observing in public schools. Integration of coursework and field work provides students the opportunity to complete various assignments in preparation for meeting Teacher Performance Expectations (TPE).
EPC 420. Educational Psychology of Adolescence (3)
Study of theory and research in educational psychology for successful teaching of adolescents. Subjects include learning, development, motivation, instruction, assessment, classroom management, individual/group differences, peer interactions, family and community influences. Issues particularly pertinent to adolescence include identity development, self-esteem, suicide, crisis prevention, and conflict resolution. Implications for teaching students from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds are considered throughout the course. Students are required to complete two field-based assignments: an adolescent case study and a secondary classroom learning environment analysis. Course may be offered online or in a classroom setting. (Required of candidates in the Single Subject Credential Program.)
EPC 423. School-Family Interpersonal Relations (3)
Dynamics of family-school relationships as they affect the interaction of teachers, parents, and pupils. Techniques and materials for parent conferences, group meetings, home visits in working toward solutions to problems of home, school, and neighborhood.
EPC 430. Development and Learning in Early Childhood Education (3)
Examination of theoretical positions in development and learning including; relevant research and implications for educational practice in early years. Some sections of this course may offer a community service opportunity with activities relating to concepts and theories presented. Check the schedule of classes for the CS designation.
EPC 430F. Fieldwork in Development and Learning in Early Childhood (1)
Recommended Corequisite or Preparatory: EPC 430. Observation, child study, and participation in a variety of preschool programs, including public schools, University Lab schools, Government and State sponsored programs and private schools. Academic Internship course.
EPC 451. Fundamentals of Counseling and Guidance (3)
Overview of several approaches to counseling in school and community settings. Understanding of case study methods in assessing individual children is included. Overall guidance programs are studied, with emphasis on counseling relationships. (Admission restricted to seniors, PBUs, and conditionally classified graduate students.)
EPC 496A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in Educational Psychology (3)
EPC 499ABC. Independent Study (1-3)

Graduate Division

The following courses are open to graduate students only. They may not be taken for undergraduate credit.
EPC 500. Fundamentals for Beginning Teachers (3)
(Fulfills requirement for Multiple Subjects Teaching Credential) This course emphasizes major concepts, principles, theories, and research in development and learning with a strong application component in the design and implementation of instruction, assessment, and equitable, healthy classroom learning communities.
EPC 600. Educational Statistics for Research and Measurement (3)
Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in basic mathematics and algebra, or permission of the instructor. Current graduate standing in the University. Introduction to basic descriptive and inferential statistics for applications to graduate courses in educational psychology, counseling, general graduate level educational courses in tests and measurements, and research. Normally a prerequisite to EPC 601, Fundamentals of Measurement; and EPC 602, Principles of Educational Research, except when waived by instructor or when equivalent course taken.
EPC 601. Individual and Group Assessment (3)
Prerequisite: EPC 600 or equivalent. Examination of individual and group assessment instruments and their application in the evaluation of intellectual performance, personality constructs, career interest, and interpersonal relations. Includes historical foundations, non-discriminatory procedures, ethical standards, and social issues. Lab Fee Required.
EPC 602. Research Principles (3)
Prerequisite: EPC 600. Introductory course in techniques, use, presentation, and understanding of research principles in education and counseling and the contributions of research to the solution of problems.
EPC 605. Advanced Psychological Foundations of Education (3)
Focuses on the interaction of the learning-teaching process. Emphasis on pertinent learning theories, individual differences in capacities and development of learners, and evaluation of learning and instructional models.
EPC 606. Seminar in Adult Development (3)
Focus on adult stages, life crises, biological, psychological and social development; includes antecedents from childhood and adolescent years. Course may be offered online or in a classroom setting.
EPC 607. Motivation in Learning and Development: Theories and Application in Educational Psychology (3)
Prerequisite: One of the following: EPC 314, 600, 430, PSY 313, or an equivalent course. Theories of motivation and research findings with specific relevance to learning process and human development within the context of educational psychology are examined. Psychological, social, cognitive and biological foundations of such motives are included. Topics include intrinsic motivation, achievement and career motivation, anxiety, causal attributions, extrinsic incentives and contingencies, and motivation in social learning. Applications of motivation theories to practical situations in educational psychology, counseling, teaching and supervising are made.
EPC 608. Social Psychological Education (3)
Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Intensive study of social psychological theories, research and types of social intervention that can be used in leadership training and group development. Includes such topics as socialization in school and family; organizational climate, roles and stereotypes in educational settings; understanding of group process and group skills in relation to goal structures; group facilitation skills; and the theory, research and practice of consultation and negotiation skills. Structured group lab experiences are included.
EPC 609. Human Development: A Life-Span Perspective (3)
Prerequisite: EPC 430 or an equivalent course. Advanced course focusing on development from infancy through later adulthood. Theories and research with special relevance to the life-span are examined. Topics include cognitive, social, and personality development, and will examine biological, environmental, and family influences. Relevance of a life-span approach to development for those in human services professions will be emphasized.
EPC 611. Seminar in Educational Psychology (3)
Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Exploration and synthesis of the issues in metacognition, information processing, and evaluation of school-age learners.
EPC 612. Advanced Study in Child and Adolescent Development (3)
Recent contributions in research, practical experimentation, or theory which have important bearing upon the problems of human development; the significance of the developmental approach in working with children and youth and their impact throughout the life-span.
EPC 613. Assessment and Evaluation of Learning (3)
Prerequisite: EPC 600 or instructor consent. Investigation of the nature of evaluation and the rationale for translating general objectives into behaviors and into measurement operations in the form of different types of tests in the different fields of knowledge. Lab fee required for residential course.
EPC 614/L. Advanced Educational Statistics (3/1)
Prerequisite: EPC 600 or equivalent and EPC 602. Provides statistical background necessary to critically analyze and carry out research in educational contexts. It extends knowledge and skills of frequently used statistical concepts including analysis of variance and covariance, regression analysis, and nonparametric analysis. Applications of these concepts are pursued in the laboratory with data sets utilizing SPSS to prepare students to complete research and evaluation studies in educational settings.
EPC 615. Introduction to Instructional Design (3)
This course is a study of theory, research, and principles of instructional design as applied to the successful development of effective instructional materials and media for learners of all ages, backgrounds, and needs in educational settings. Topics studied include instructional design, theories and models, assessment, proposals, layout principles, mockups, presentation techniques, and instructional strategies, materials, products, and media. University graduate students will find this course helpful in the development of master’s projects, such as handbooks, workshops, and web sites. Course may be offered online or in a classroom setting.
EPC 620. College Counseling and Student Services Profession (3)
Examines theories and research in the field of student affairs. Introduces specialty areas, roles, and functions of college counselors and student services professionals. Analyzes current problems, future trends, professional standards, legal issues, and ethical concerns, as well as organizational patterns and the interactions of academic, business, and student affairs areas.
EPC 622. American College Student and Campus Environment (3)
Examines personal characteristics and attitudes, social-cultural factors, and developmental theory as they pertain to traditional and non-traditional college students. Explores student development, student service, and campus ecology approaches. Surveys environmental assessment and needs analysis techniques, program planning, intervention strategies, and program evaluation relevant to the college population.
EPC 630. The Infant-Parent Dyad and The Social/ Emotional Development of The Infant-Toddler (3)
Prerequisite: EPC 430 or equivalent. Examination of the infant-parent dyad is a fundamental building block to understanding the social/emotional development of the infant and toddler. Students learn the most current research regarding affective regulation, shared attention and two-way communication in the context of parent-infant interaction. Attention is given to understanding individual differences in coping styles supporting optimal development of social/emotional competence.
EPC 631. Family, Culture, and Ecological Influences On Early Childhood Mental Health Development (3)
Prerequisite: EPC 430 or equivalent. Exploration of a broad range of family, cultural, and ecological factors that influence early childhood development and mental health. Drawing upon current research and promising practices from the fields of education and mental health, students will increase their understanding of protective and risk factors that strengthen or weaken families within psychological, cultural and ecological contexts and strategies to support the development and maintenance of optimal mental health of young children and their families.
EPC 632. Issues, Theories, and Current Practices in Early Childhood (3)
Prerequisite: EPC 430. Current issues and trends in Early Childhood Education; examination of relationships between basic assumptions, theory, and practice.
EPC 633. Neurobiological Development, Sensory Issues and Challenges in Early Childhood (3)
Prerequisites: EPC 430 or equivalent. Understanding the interaction of biology and early experience in achieving developmental milestones. Neurodevelopmental and sensory profiles help parents, teachers and related professionals to understand children’s early experience of themselves, others and their world.
EPC 634. Language and Concept Development in The Early School Years (3)
Prerequisite: EPC 430. Study of research and current theoretical positions in language and concept development with major emphasis on the implications for learning in the school setting.
EPC 635. Foundations of Developmental Curriculum for Early Childhood (3)
Prerequisites: EPC 430 and 632 or instructor consent. To be taken concurrently with experiences in the field either teaching or field work.
EPC 636. Systems and Policies in Infant-Toddler-Family Mental Health (3)
Focus on the systems and policies that support optimal infant-toddler-family mental health. Students participate in researching the national, state and local legislation that influences the related child care, education and service delivery systems. This includes the exploration of private and public agencies in place to administer and/or deliver services for young children and their families. Mapping these systems of care and education as well as constructing the professional’s role in the system culminates in an increased knowledge of and understanding of the policies that support optimal infant-toddler-family mental health. Finally, understanding the role of these systems as seen from a family’s perspective informs and supports the family’s successful navigation to obtain appropriate care and education resources for their child.
EPC 637. Comparative Early Childhood Education and Care (3)
Prerequisites: EPC 430, 632, and a course in child psychology or child development; Graduate standing. Seminar in early education and child care in different countries. Topics include: division of responsibility for child between family and state, predominant national values and goals, and the way in which these are reflected in the methodology and curricula of early childhood education.
EPC 638. Infant Development, Care and Education: Issues, Programs, Directions (3)
Prerequisite: EPC 430 or FCS 335 or equivalent 3 unit course. Basic course in infant or early childhood development. Theory and research on various aspects of infant development care and education. Assessment of infants from birth to age 3, with and without handicaps, for educational planning. Infant intervention and infant day care issues, programs, problems, and directions.
EPC 639A-F. Fieldwork in Early Childhood (1-6)
Prerequisites: EPC 430 and formal admittance into the Masters Program in Early Childhood Education. Supervised Fieldwork in a variety of early childhood and parent-child settings. Students are required to spend 20 hours in the fieldwork per academic unit (e.g. three units requires 60 hours of fieldwork) and participate in a two-hour weekly seminar with their fieldwork professor. Normally, students will enroll in this course for 3 units (639C) during their first semester, requiring work directly with young children. Successful completion of this course is required for students to be fully classified in the Masters Program in Early Childhood Education. Additional semesters may be taken as program electives in settings approved by the course professor.
EPC 640. Creativity and The School (3)
Focus on identifying, generating, and extending a range of behaviors and conditions that will increase creative productivity in the classroom. Examines various models of the creative process as well as the social/historical influences that have affected school practices. (Crosslisted with EED 652) (Offered spring semester)
EPC 641. Evaluation in The Bilingual Classroom (3)
Basic course designed to deal with evaluation of the Bilingual student. Primary emphasis is placed on the purpose of educational evaluation; the relationship between students identified needs; instructional objectives (cognitive, socio-emotional and psychomotor) and assessment strategies, criteria for instrument construction/selection, strategies for individual diagnosis, prescription and evaluation of the Bilingual learner.
EPC 642. Assessment and Evaluation in Early Childhood Education
Prerequisite: 639C or consent of instructor. Theories of child assessment and program evaluation related to children from birth to age 8 are studied. Practical applications of theory, design, and ethical use of assessment and evaluation are applied in a field-based case project.
EPC 643. Counseling in Cross-Cultural Settings (3)
Prerequisite: EPC 451 or equivalent 3 unit course. Principles of effective cross-cultural counseling including applicable theories, goals, skills and techniques. Emphasis on historical and theoretical frameworks, culture conflict and personal identity, coping vs. personal empowerment, and effective intervention models when working with ethnic and linguistic minorities. Designed for mental health personnel in school and community settings.
EPC 644. Current Issues in Infant-Toddler-Family Mental Health (3)
Exploration of new advances in infant-toddler-family development, noting technological advances in measurement leading to increased understanding of neurodevelopment. The interaction of the development of emotion and cognition and influences of environmental factors. Consideration of multiple factors affecting development in the child’s context of meaningful attachment relationships.
EPC 645. Introduction to Humanistic Education (3)
Designed to assist teachers and counselors in integrating the “affective” spectrum in the lives of students by applying insights gained from humanistic psychology. The integration of affective concerns into the cognitive content of lessons through the use of role playing, simulations, fantasy and group process is discussed and demonstrated.
EPC 646. Applied Child Development for Parent and Child Educators (3)
Prerequisite: A course in Child Development. Recommended Course: EPC 638 or 633. Seminar on behavior of children that creates problems for them and that adults find difficult. Examination of factors that contribute to emotional and behavior problems. Interaction between temperament and environment, and early signs of vulnerability for later pathology. The major focus is on applications of knowledge to effective and growth-supporting ways of dealing with children, geared to prevention of serious problems.
EPC 647. Assessment and Intervention with Child and Family in Various Settings (3)
Prerequisite: A course in Child Development. Recommended Course: EPC 646. Study of stress and problems that impinge upon parents and children and interfere with healthy intra-family interactions. Structured observations as assessment. Examination of methods of assessing strength and problems of child, parents, teacher/care provider and environments. Adapting assessment to settings: home, school, child care settings. Planning strategies for assessment-based intervention and evaluation of effectiveness.
EPC 647L. Lab in Parent-Child Assessment and Intervention (1)
Prerequisite: Concurrent or prior enrollment in EPC 647. Applications of assessment of children and adults-child interactions (studied in EPC 647) with an emphasis on techniques of observational assessment, and planning of intervention strategies for individual cases.
EPC 648. Consultation with Parents, Teachers and Other Human Service Professionals (3)
Prerequisite: A course in Child Development. Recommended Course: EPC 646 or 647. Exploration and study of theory-derived practices regarding communication and consultation with parents and teachers with respect to problems they encounter with children. Educational and clinical applications. Issues regarding information sharing with other professionals. Collaborating with other professionals and making referrals.
EPC 648L. Lab in Consulting with Parents, Teachers and Other Professionals (1)
Prerequisite: Concurrent or prior enrollment in EPC 648. Practice in consulting with parents and professionals, based on the study of the content of EPC 648 of which this lab is an adjunct. Practice occurs both in the form of role playing and peer consulting and, when possible, with parents, child care providers or teachers in the field.
EPC 649. Practicum in Parent-Child Consultation (1-4)
Each unit requires 40 hours of work in the field. Prerequisite: EPC 647 or 648. Recommended Courses: EPC 647 and 648. Supervised practice of assessment, intervention planning and consulting with parents and/or other adults caring for child. Practicum in the field includes individual and group consulting with parents (both with and without children present) and, when appropriate, with other adults (teachers, caregivers). (Credit/No Credit Only)
EPC 650. The Counselor in The Community (3)
Prerequisites: EPC 451 or undergraduate major in social or behavioral science and department acceptance into M.S. program in Counseling or final acceptance into Pupil Personnel Services Credential Program. Introduction to precepts of community counseling in the emerging fields of Human Services. Theories of counseling, cultural diversity, career choice, perception, motivation, women, aging, are covered. Institutions: schools, the world of work, families, partnerships, and case study methods are included.
EPC 651. Seminar in Pupil Personnel Services in Elementary and Secondary Schools (3)
Prerequisites: EPC 654; 656. Comprehensive study of pupil personnel services within elementary and secondary schools including: role and function of the counselor; development and organization of guidance services; program evaluation strategies; model guidance programs; individual evaluation instruments specific to children; techniques of consulting with teachers, parents, and other school personnel; appropriate referral agencies; professional resources; and current issues.
EPC 652. Family Law (3)
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Consideration of the statutory regulations and community and social provisions relating to families, and of their implementation. Coordination of legal and social agencies.
EPC 653. Measurement for School and Career Counseling (3)
Prerequisite: EPC 600. Investigation of standardized group tests, with emphasis on their sources, evaluation, selection, administration, scoring and interpretation of results. Lab Fee Required.
EPC 655. Seminar in Counseling Theory and Practice (3)
Prerequisite: EPC 451. Advanced course in counseling theory and practice. Influential theories of counseling are analyzed, evaluated and compared. Techniques associated with each theory are examined and practiced. Refinement of the student’s personal counseling style is emphasized.
EPC 656. Seminar in Child Counseling (3)
Prerequisite: EPC 451. Includes child and adolescent counseling theories and research, evaluation approaches, therapeutic techniques, legal and ethical problems, parent and teacher consultation techniques and community resources. Child abuse, suicide prevention, crisis intervention approaches, peer group interactions, and substance abuse are also studied.
EPC 657A. Seminar in Career Counseling Theory (3)
Prerequisite: EPC 451. Comprehensive review and critique of current career development and decision theories; exploration of changing concepts of work and careers, and their implications for career planning. Focus on the relationship of career to other issues of counseling and development. Lab Fee Required.
EPC 657B. Seminar in Career Counseling Resources (3)
Prerequisite: EPC 451. Application of career/life planning concepts and strategies in various career education and counseling settings; sources of educational and career information and career counseling referral agencies. Focus is on the use of objective information in career counseling. Meets Pupil Personnel Services course requirement in career education and counseling. Lab Fee Required.
EPC 658/L. Seminar in Group Counseling and Lab (3/1)
Prerequisites: 659A. Corequisite: EPC 658L. Preparatory: EPC 451; 655; instructor consent. Theory and practice of group counseling: group work and group development in various settings. Designed to develop and increase understanding and skills related to group counseling; to stimulate interest in working with groups; to enable counseling personnel to consider appropriate uses for group counseling and to evaluate its effectiveness in demonstration and practice. Lab: Extensive practical experience in group counseling entailing supervised feedback. Theory is applied to the actual practice of group work.
EPC 659A. Counseling Practicum Communication (3)
Recommended Corequisite: EPC 655. Communication theory and skills, designed to help students develop greater self-knowledge and become aware of their impact on others through participation in group experiences and peer counseling; emphasis on verbal and non-verbal cues, refinement of basic response skills, and the subtleties of language and style.
EPC 659B. Counseling Practicum: Skills (3)
Prerequisite: EPC 659A. Recommended Corequisite: EPC 643. Supervised application of counseling skills in classroom and fieldwork settings, including peer counseling and field counseling sessions. Normally students enroll in EPC 659A and 659B for 2, 3-unit semesters. A 3rd semester may be approved with consultation with the advisor.
EPC 659C and D. Fieldwork in Counseling Services (1-6)
Prerequisites: EPC 643; 655; 659A; 659B. Supervised field training in an organized program for those specializing in pupil personnel services at either elementary or secondary level, or those in community-based counseling programs. Flexible units with consent of advisor. Normally students enroll in EPC 659C and EPC 659D for 2, 3-unit semesters. A 3rd semester may be approved with consultation with the advisor. (Credit/No Credit Only)
EPC 659E and F. Fieldwork in School Psychology (1-6)
These two courses are designed to help the student learn the job of the School Psychologist through actual fieldwork experience. Primary emphasis is on learning the function of a School Psychologist; increasing psycho-diagnostic skills to a point where the student is able to select, administer, and interpret appropriate assessment measures; learning to work with children, parents, teachers, and administrators; acquiring skill in administrative and coordinating aspects of the job. Students work closely with the field and campus supervisors. Normally students enroll in EPC 659E and 659F for 2, 3-unit semesters. A 3rd semester may be approved with consultation with the advisor. (Credit/No Credit Only)
EPC 659G AND H. Internship in School Psychology (1-6)
Prerequisites: EPC 659E and 659F or PSY 655C. Intensive supervised internship in a multi-cultural school for those completing the Pupil Personnel Services Credential/ School Psychologist Authorization. Course objectives require vigorous application of diagnostic prescriptive and consultative skills. Students complete a total of six units. Actual number of units per semester is determined by instructor and student. Normally students enroll in EPC 659G and 659H for 2, 3-unit semesters. (Credit/No Credit Only)
EPC 659J AND K. Fieldwork in College Counseling and Student Services (1-6)
Prerequisites: EPC 620, 659A/B. Intensive supervised fieldwork experience in an organized program for those specializing in college counseling and student services. Students are required to develop a comprehensive learning plan and spend at least two hours per week in individual and /or group supervision. Actual number of units per semester is determined by instructor and student. Normally students will enroll in EPC 659JK for two, 3-unit semester. (Credit/No Credit Only)
EPC 659L AND M. Internship in Counseling in Business, Industry and Government (1-6)
Prerequisite: Instructor consent. 8 hours per week supervised placement in business or industrial setting with experience in employee assistance counseling, human resources development and career development counseling. Students attend weekly seminars and work closely with university and on-site supervisors, receiving one hour face-to-face supervision per week. Normally students enroll in EPC 659L and 659M for two, 3-unit semesters. A 3rd semester may be approved with consultation with the advisor. (Credit/No Credit Only)
EPC 659X. Counseling Practicum: Genetic Counseling Skills (3)
Prerequisite: Acceptance into the graduate program in Genetic Counseling, or permission from the instructor. Lectures and discussion covering the practice-based competencies required by the American Board of Genetic Counseling (ABGC), shown at www.faseb.org/genetics/abgc/acc-04b.htm. Supervised practical application of genetic counseling skills in the classroom
EPC 660. Counseling for Career Adjustment and Change (3)
Prerequisite: EPC 657A. Seminar to develop career counseling competencies uniquely related to the needs of adult clients who are faced with problems of career adjustment and change. Includes theoretical constructs and models to prepare career counseling professionals for work in business and industry, adult schools and higher education, and various private settings.
EPC 661. Multi-Systemic Behavioral Interventions (3)
Provides school psychology students with comprehensive research based information and best practices on how to assess children with behavioral disabilities and develop interventions. A multi-systemic behavioral approach to intervention is emphasized. Use of functional assessment, behavior intervention and prevention programs for students with behavioral disabilities is discussed. Additionally, students learn single-case methodology and begin learning about behavior consultation.
EPC 662. Current Issues in Career Education and Counseling (3)
Prerequisite: EPC 657A. Seminar to investigate current and emerging issues which affect the nature of career education and counseling. Focus is on the implications of the counseling needs of special populations, job market shifts and the availability of work, changing work patterns, and longitudinal career development research, for career counseling practices.
EPC 663A/L. Clinical and Psychometrics Assessment Techniques and Lab (3/2)
Prerequisites: EPC 601 and SPED 610. Recommended Corequisite: EPC 659E. History, theory and practice of individual assessment. Emphasis on cognitive/intellectual abilities testing as it relates to learning and adequate functioning. Supervised practice in test administration, interpretation of data from multiple sources and communication of results for program planning. (Limited to students accepted in the School Psychologist Credential Program.) Lab fee required.
EPC 663. B/L Clinical and Psychometric Assessment Techniques and Lab (3/2)
Prerequisite: EPC 663 A/L. Recommended Corequisite: EPC 659F. History, theory and practice of individual assessment. Emphasis on socio-emotional abilities and personality assessment related to learning and adequate functioning. Supervised practice in test administration, interpretation of data from multiple sources and communication of results for program planning. (Limited to students accepted in the School Psychologist
EPC 664. Neurodevelopmental, Emotional and Behavior Disorders (3)
The course provides a knowledge base of the etiology and characteristics of major neurodevelopmental, emotional, and behavior disorders in children and youth, as well as an understanding of current evidence-based interventions in the schools. Students will be introduced to the ecological factors in the development of common disorders, including: biological bases, family, school, peer, community, and school influences. Information learned will be used as guidelines for identifying children in the schools who need treatment. Lab fee required.
EPC 665. School-Based Counseling of Children and Teens (3)
Prerequisite: EPC 659A/659B. Emphasizes the use of creative, reflective, interpersonal, and critical thinking skills to counsel children and teenagers and to consult collaboratively with parents, teachers, and other professionals in a school-based, inclusive learning community. Research and theory are linked to best practices in wellness promotion, crisis intervention, and individual and group counseling. Application of developmental, diversity, and ecology theories, as well as legal and ethical principles is stressed.
EPC 667. Introduction to School Psychology (3)
Prerequisite: Admission into the program in school psychology. Corequisite: EPC 659A. School Psychology is a profession dedicated to enhancing the educational and mental health needs of all pupils. Provides an introduction to current roles and functions of school psychologists as these are guided by the history of the profession, the professional ethical and education standards, the state and national legal mandates, and future trends. Students spend a minimum of 50 hours in the schools getting to know the role of school psychologists and the organization of schools.
EPC 668. Partnerships for Excellence in Early Childhood Education (3)
Prerequisites: EPC 639C, formal application to enroll in the course, or permission of instructor prior to the beginning of the semester. Students meet with mentors and faculty to study, design, implement, and evaluate outcomes of quality improvement consultation/collaboration in center-based early care and learning programs. Field-based experience and weekly attendance in faculty-led seminar sessions are included. Students are required to submit a course application and be approved for enrollment prior to the beginning of the semester. The course may be taken up to three times with the approval of the course instructor and/or M.A. program coordinator(s).
EPC 670. Family Counseling (3)
Prerequisites: EPC 451; 650. Theory and practice of family counseling. Study of counseling problems and situations related to families. Analysis of transcriptions and actual demonstrations; examination of major theorists; theoretical formulations; analysis of family dysfunction; goals of family counseling and conditions for behavior changes.
EPC 671. Laws and Ethics for Counselors (3)
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing. Consideration of legal requirements and ethical principles related to families and students, including implementation of legal and ethical standards and coordination with legal and social agencies.
EPC 675. Counseling and Chemical Dependency (3)
Examination of counseling issues pertaining to chemically dependent, drug abusing clients with focus on etiology, historical and contemporary patterns of abusers and their families, assessment, and treatment.
EPC 676. Seminar in Genetic Counseling (3)
Prerequisite: Acceptance into the graduate program in Genetic Counseling, or permission from the instructor. Focuses on contemporary issues in genetic counseling including the social/cultural, ethical/legal, and individual/ family foundations. Attitudes and values of a diverse multicultural client population in the genetic counseling context will be examined. Crisis and grief counseling are included. Focus is on the relevance of these issues in the clinical setting.
EPC 677. Counseling Couples in Relationships (3)
Prerequisite: EPC 451 and admission to MFT program, or permission of instructor. Provides theories and skills in counseling couples, including family issues, parenting, domestic friction and violence, new marriages, non-traditional marriages, multi-cultural issues, partnerships, and divorce. Required for MFCC major.
EPC 678. Psychopharmacology. Therapists (2)
Prerequisites: EPC 601, EPC 659B, EPC 695B or Advanced Behavior Disorders. Psychopharmacological management of mental disorders. Covers basic nervous system functioning, biochemical theories of mental disorders, and various classes of psychoactive medications used to treat major mental disorders across the lifespan and within the context of gender, race, culture, and ethnic identity. Emphasis is placed on the role of the non-medical therapist in the assessment, referral, and management of clients treated with psychotropic medication.
EPC 680. Seminar in School Psychology (3)
In-depth review of topics in educational and social psychology relevant to the school psychologist. Exploration and analysis of personal requirements necessary for competence as a school psychologist. A culminating seminar required for the School Psychologist Credential.
EPC 681. Classroom Communication and Management Methods (3)
Prerequisites: Possession of Elementary School Teaching Credential; EPC 314 (or equivalent 3 unit course), or PSY 350. Focuses on a study of the theoretical bases and the implementation of a range of approaches to classroom communication and management; e.g., the behavioral modification approach, the socio-emotional climate approach, and the group-process approach. These approaches are used in role-playing and analyzing typical classroom problem situations. (Crosslisted with EED 681)
EPC 682. Foundations of School Counseling (3)
Overview and introductory program course in school counseling, covering the history of school counseling; academic, personal/social, and career development domains of school counseling; state and national standards; the mission and philosophy of the CSUN program; social justice issues, including inequity in education and achievement; model school counseling programs; and current research and trends in the field.
EPC 683. Collaboration with Families in Educational Settings (3)
Prerequisite: EPC 314 or EPC 430 or equivalent course or instructor consent. Principles and practices of collaborating with families in educational settings from infant and child care programs through high school. Considerations of attachment, family systems theory, family forms, the role of culture and the ecological perspective, the impact of family on child development and student achievement, and current research.
EPC 684. Educational Program Evaluation and Assessment (3)
Prerequisites: EPC 602.Basic principles and methods of educational program evaluation and measurement within the pre-K-12 schools. Includes evaluation models, current assessments used in schools, and current research in program evaluation. Addresses issues in measurement and evaluation, including bias in testing, test-based tracking, and alignment of standards and assessments.
EPC 687. Career Guidance, College Selection, and Technology in School Settings (3)
Application of concepts and strategies for providing career/life planning and college selection services using various aspects of technology. Focus is on the use of objective information in career counseling and college selection. Meets PPS course requirement in career education and counseling.
EPC 688. Measurement and Assessment in School Settings (3)
Prerequisite: EPC 600. Investigation of standardized group tests, with emphasis on their sources, evaluation, selection, administration, scoring and interpretation of results. Lab Fee Required.
EPC 689. Leadership in School Counseling (3)
Prerequisites: EPC 682 and 659A/B. Overview of the knowledge and skills required for effective leadership in schools by school counselors with an emphasis on organizing, implementing, managing, and evaluating comprehensive school guidance and counseling programs. Topics include: leadership theory and principles, current research in educational leadership, leadership skills, education reform movements, strategic planning, school climate and culture, school-based management and collaborative decision-making, school counseling management systems, and team building.
EPC 695A-Z. Seminar in Selected Studies (3)
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Special seminars in selected topics.
EPC 696. Directed Graduate Research (3)
Students are responsible for defining and organizing their own research problems. Reports on research are expected to be made to department faculty. (Credit/No Credit Only)
EPC 697. Directed Comprehensive Studies (3)
Prerequisite: Prior completion of all courses required in the program. Advanced studies of comprehensive topics. (Credit/No Credit Only)
EPC 698C. Thesis/graduate Project (3-6)
Prerequisite: Prior completion of all courses required in the program. Acceptance by a thesis committee. A thesis or project on an advanced topic in the field of education. (Credit/No Credit Only)
EPC 699A-C. Independent Study (1-3)