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Child and Adolescent Development

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College of Health and Human Development

  • Sequoia Hall (SQ) 285
  • (818) 677-3385
  • www.csun.edu/hhd/cadv

Faculty

  • Rosemary Gonzalez, Joyce Munsch, Whitney Scott Lewis, April Taylor, W. David Wakefield

Emeritus Faculty

  • Carol Kelly, Barbara Polland

Programs

  • Undergraduate Degree:
  • B.A. in Child and Adolescent Development*

Major

The Department of Child and Adolescent Development offers an interdisciplinary liberal arts degree program which leads to a Bachelor of Arts in Child and Adolescent Development. Students explore the scientific study of human development from birth through adolescence with an interdisciplinary focus that includes psychological, educational, and social-behavioral perspectives. A critical component of the degree program includes connecting theories to practice through fieldwork and internships with community organizations and schools throughout the San Fernando Valley and greater Los Angeles area.

Students in the major complete coursework from multiple academic departments across the Cal State Northridge campus that center around (a) an overview of the field, (b) the domains of social and cognitive development, (c) modes of inquiry and research in development, (d) cultural and linguistic influences on development, (e) professional development and training, and (f) a range of elective coursework that may be based on students’ interests.

The major provides a strong foundation for post-baccalaureate graduate programs in child and adolescent development, educational psychology, developmental psychology, school psychology, early childhood education, special education, educational leadership, marriage and family therapy, clinical social work, clinical psychology, and teaching credential programs.

Careers

The major will be of interest to a wide range of students, including those who are interested in direct-service careers with children and families (i.e., teaching, counseling, therapy, social work, etc.) as well as indirect-service professions (i.e., educational researchers, lobbyists, consultants, school administrators, politicians, etc.).

Many professional careers in the field of child and adolescent development require advanced degrees and/or credentials as well as relevant work experience. After completing the Bachelor of Arts degree, students can pursue advanced degrees and credentials leading to careers including, but not limited to: early childhood education teachers, elementary, middle and high school teachers, special education teachers, school counselors and school psychologists, school principals and administrators, school board members, educational researchers, child and family attorneys, child psychologists and therapists, licensed clinical social workers, pediatricians and obstetricians, registered nurses, child life specialists, genetic counselors, college/university professors, community/youth agency administrators, educational consultants, policy and legislative analysts, and politicians.

Academic Advisement

Students are encouraged to visit the department website for the most current information and news in the department. Electronic versions of forms and worksheets are also found at the department website. Students are strongly encouraged to make an appointment with the department academic advisor through the department website. The Department’s faculty advisor, Nancy Petry, can be reached at nancy.petry@csun.edu.

Students are encouraged to use the list of degree requirements listed below in planning and selecting coursework for the degree. One advantage of the interdisciplinary nature of the major is that students often have multiple options for courses that meet the same degree requirement. To select the best course, students should carefully read the catalog descriptions of each course option to ensure a strong match between students’ personal goals and the course learning objectives. Students are encouraged to enroll in courses taught by Child and Adolescent Development faculty whenever possible since the themes of (a) technological literacy, (b) critical thinking and writing, and (c) professional and career development are integrated throughout each of the CADV courses. These features will benefit students’ professional and academic preparation in the field of Child and Adolescent Development.

Transfer Students

Students interested in majoring in Child and Adolescent Development who are transferring from a community college or four year university are strongly encouraged to complete all of their General Education courses (e.g., become GE certified) before transferring to Cal State Northridge to help ensure timely graduation. It is helpful if transfer students complete the equivalent courses to CADV 150 (Foundations of Child and Adolescent Development), MATH 140 (Introductory Statistics), and PSY 150 (Principles of Human Behavior) before transferring. These courses are available at most colleges and universities. Students can use the ASSIST website (www.assist.org) to determine the correct course equivalencies.

Affiliated Student Organization

The Child and Adolescent Development Association (CADA) is a student organization affiliated with the Department of Child and Adolescent Development. CADA strives to enrich the lives of its members by providing career, academic, and professional development activities. The Association also provides opportunities for students to develop social and professional networks within the field of child and adolescent development, education, and child psychology. For more information, visit www.csun.edu/cada or send an email to cada@csun.edu.

Student Learning Outcomes for the Undergraduate Program

Graduates of the undergraduate program in Child and Adolescent Development should be able to:

  • 1. Demonstrate knowledge of the theories, concepts, and methodology that underlie the study of the physical, cognitive, and social development of children and adolescents and the multiple contexts in which they live.
  • 2. Apply developmental theories in community settings.
  • 3. Write critically about theories and constructs of child and adolescent development.
  • 4. Orally deliver information in a manner that engages an audience.
  • 5. Facilitate the development of humans from birth through adolescence in a culturally pluralistic society.
  • 6. Gain knowledge of culture, race and ethnicity while increasing their personal self-awareness and discovering strategies for implementing social justice within the larger community.
  • 7. Demonstrate technological literacy that allows both access to and dissemination of information electronically. Demonstrate effective management of information by utilizing media sources and complying with the ethics of manipulating and presenting information.
  • 8. Describe, critique, and practice various empirical methodologies used to study child and adolescent development including design, data analysis, and interpretation.
  • 9. articulate and participate in the importance of developing professionalism including the areas of career exploration, ethical issues of direct services to youth, and service learning in the community.

Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts Degree

1. Lower Division Required Courses
Introduction to the Field (13 units)
  • CADV 150 Foundations of Child and Adolescent Development (3)
  • CADV 250 The Child and Adolescent Development Profession (3)
  • MATH 140 Introductory Statistics (4)*
  • PSY 150 Introduction to Psychology (3)*
  • *Also count as General Education courses, Social Sciences
2. Upper Division Required Courses
Choose one Modes of Inquiry courses (3-4 units):
  • CADV 380 Methods of Child and Adolescent Study (3)
  • PSY 320/L Statistical Methods in Psychological Research (3/1)
  • FCS 431/L Child and Family Assessment (3/1)
Domains of Development (9 units)
  • CADV 350 Applied Cognitive Development (3)
  • CADV 352 Applied Social Development (3)
Choose one of the following:
  • LING 417 Language Development and Acquisition (3)
  • EPC 315 Psychological Foundations of Learning and Teaching (3)
  • FCS 432 Family Theories (3)
  • PSY 304 Cognitive Psychology and Instruction (3)
  • PSY 464 Cognitive and Behavioral Techniques (3)
Cultural/Linguistic Contexts of Child and Adolescent Development (9 units)
  • CADV 460 Race, Ethnicity, Gender and Culture in Development (3)
Choose one of the following Cultural Contexts courses:
  • AAS 355 Biracial and Multiracial Identity (3)
  • AAS 450 The Asian American Child and the Schools (3)
  • AAS 453 Asian American Families (3)
  • ARMN 440 The Armenian American Child (3)
  • CHS 430 The Chicano/a Child (3)
  • CHS 431 The Chicano/a Adolescent (3)
  • CHS 432 Counseling the Chicano/a Child (3)
  • PAS 420 The Black Child (3)
  • PAS 421 Strategies for Black Child Development (3)
Choose one of the following Linguistic Contexts courses:
  • ANTH 310 Language in Culture: Anthropological Linguistics (3)
  • CHS 433 Language Acquisition of the Chicano (3)
  • CHS 482 Language of the Barrio (3)
  • DEAF 360 American Deaf Culture (3)
  • ENG 301 Language and Linguistics (3)
  • ENG 405 Language Differences and Language Change (3)
  • LING 441 Sociolinguistics (3)
  • PAS 395 Bilingualism in the African American Community (3)
  • SPAN 310 Language and Contemporary Life (3)
Professional Development: all students must take CADV 470 and complete Option 1 or Option 2 (10-12 units)
  • CADV 470 Advanced Concepts and Theories (3)
  • Option 1

Take CADV 394B/494B* Child and Adolescent Development Internships (2/2), and choose one course from the Option 2.

  • Option 2
Choose any three of the following courses:
  • CADV/RTM 406/L Enhancing Childhood Creativity (2/1)
  • CADV 450 Helping Children Cope with Medical Environments (3)
  • CADV 451 Alternative Approaches to Discipline (3)
  • CADV 452 Child Advocacy (3)
  • CADV 495A* Child and Adolescent Development Graduate School Skills and Applied Research Training I (3)
  • CADV 495B* Child and Adolescent Development Graduate School Skills and Applied Research Methods II (3)
  • CADV 499C Independent Study (3)
  • FCS 480 The Helping Professional (3)
  • PSY 492SOC Professional Development in the Social Sciences I (1)
  • PSY 493SOC Professional Development in the Social Sciences II (1)
  • SOC 459 Child Welfare (3)

*Students interested in enrolling in these courses must complete an application available at the Department Office (SQ 281) and the Department website.

3. Electives (12 Units)

Choose any 12 units of coursework from the list below. Courses are organized by areas of interest. Courses are only counted once in the major, either as a required course or as an elective, but not as both.

Development
  • CADV/RTM 406/L Enhancing Childhood Creativity (2/1)
  • CADV 451 Alternative Approaches to Discipline (3)
  • ENG 301 Language and Linguistics (3)
  • LING 417 Language Development and Acquisition (3)
  • FCS 335 Prenatal and Infant Development (3)
  • FCS 438 Adolescents in the Family Context (3)
  • PSY 361 Adolescence (3)
Atypical Development
  • PSY 310 Behavior Disorders (3)
  • PSY 317 Psychopharmacology (3)
  • PSY 406 Developmental Disabilities (3)
  • PSY 454 Clinical Psychology (3)
  • PSY 464 Cognitive and Behavioral Intervention Techniques (3)
  • SOC 348 Juvenile Delinquency (3)
  • SPED 400 Introduction to Special Education (3)
  • SPED 401A Instruction in Special Education: Assessment and Instruction (3)
  • SPED 402A Behavior Assessment and Positive Behavior Support (3)
  • SPED 431 Atypical Development of Infants and Toddlers (3)
Education
  • CADV 406/L Enhancing Childhood Creativity (2/1)
  • CADV 452 Child Advocacy (3)
  • CADV 451 Alternative Approaches to Discipline (3)
  • ART 383 Art in Early Childhood (3)
  • ART 479 Art Education Across Cultures (3)
  • ENG 428 Children’s Literature (3)
  • ENG 429 Adolescent Literature (3)
  • EPC 315 Psychological Foundations of Learning and Teaching (3)
  • FCS 433 Administration of Children’s Programs (3)
  • FCS 436 Parental Development (3)
  • KIN 370/L Physical Education in Early Childhood Education (2/1)
  • KIN 470/L Physical Education for Children (2/1)
  • RTM 305 Dynamics of Early Childhood Play (3)
  • RTM 352 Play and Human Potential (3)
  • MUS 361/L Music Literature for Children (2/1)
  • MUS 362/L Music for Early Childhood (2/1)
  • PSY 312 Psychological Aspects of Parenthood (3)
Counseling
  • CADV 450 Helping Children Cope with Medical Environments (3)
  • FCS 340 Marriage and Family Relations (3)
  • FCS 480 The Helping Professional (3)
  • ART 481 Art as Therapy (3)
  • EPC 451 Fundamentals of Counseling and Guidance (3)
  • PSY 460 Counseling and Interviewing (3)
  • PSY 483 Principles of Human Relations (3)
  • SOC 345 Social Psychology (3)
  • SOC 426 Social Legislation and Social Policy (3)
  • SOC 459 Child Welfare (3)
  • SOC 481 Counseling, Interviewing and Intervention (3)
Culture, Language and Development
  • AAS 355 Biracial and Multiracial Identity (3)
  • AAS 450 The Asian American Child and the Schools (3)
  • ANTH 310 Language in Culture (3)
  • ARMN 440 The Armenian-American Child (3)
  • CHS 430 The Chicano/a Child (3)
  • CHS 431 The Chicano/a Adolescent (3)
  • CHS 432 Counseling the Chicano/a Child (3)
  • CHS 433 Language Acquisition of the Chicano/a and ESL Speakers (3)
  • DEAF 485 Issues in American Sign Language (3)
  • ENG 301 Language and Linguistics (3)
  • LING 417 Language Development and Acquisition (3)
  • PAS 420 The Black Child (3)
  • PAS 421 Strategies for Black Child Development (3)
  • SPAN 310 Language and Contemporary Hispanic Life (3)
Research, Methodology and Assessment
  • CADV 380 Methods of Child and Adolescent Study (3)
  • CADV 495A Graduate School Skills and Applied Research I (3)
  • CADV 495B Graduate School Skills and Applied Research II (3)
  • CADV 499C Independent Study (3)
  • RTM 403 Evaluation Research in Recreation and Human Services (3)
  • PSY 320/L Statistical Methods in Psychological Research and Lab (3/1)
  • PSY 321/L Experimental Psychology (3/1)
  • PSY 420/L Advanced Statistical Methods and Lab (3/1)
  • PSY 492SOC Professional Development in the Social Sciences I (1)
  • PSY 493SOC Professional Development in the Social Sciences II (1)
  • FCS 431/L Child Growth and Development II (3/1)

General Education

Several major courses also meet GE requirements. CADV 150 meets Social Sciences Lower Division GE. MATH 140 is a Basic Skills course. ANTH 310, FCS 340 and RTM 352 meet Upper Division General Education requirements.

  • Units in the Major:
  • 56-59

Honors Program in Child and Adolescent Development

This program provides students with opportunities to develop and strengthen specific competencies such as academic writing, research skills, and community engagement that are essential for entrance into post-baccalaureate degree granting programs. To receive the Child and Adolescent Development with Honors degree, a student must:

  • a. Declare Child and Adolescent Development major
  • b. Complete CADV Honors Program Application by application deadline
  • c. Complete a minimum of 45 units in letter graded courses at Cal State Northridge
  • d. Score of 10 or better on the Upper Division Writing Examination
  • e. Complete CADV 394B/494B or CADV 495A-B
  • f. Earn a “B” or better in CADV 470 (Honors)
  • g. Earn a 3.50 GPA or better in courses listed below:
  • CADV 150 or equivalent, CADV 250, CADV 350, CADV 352
  • CADV 380 or PSY 320 or FCS 431/L, CADV 460, ANTH 310 or ENG 301, LING 417, MATH 140 or equivalent, PSY 320/L, PSY 321/L.

Credentials

Child Development Permit: The Child Development Permit is a document which verifies that you have fulfilled the requirements established by the Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC) (www.ctc.ca.gov) for assisting, teaching, or supervising in a child development program (pre-kindergarten) in the State of California. The Child Development Training Consortium (www.childdevelopment.org) provides information related to these permits. Information is also available on the Child and Adolescent Development Website and in the department office in SQ 285.

California Teaching Credential: Teachers employed in public schools in California must hold a valid teaching credential authorized by the Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC) (www.ctc.ca.gov). Child and Adolescent Development majors who are interested in becoming elementary school teachers must also complete a teaching credential program. The Cal State Northridge Teaching Credential Program offers both the Multiple-Subject Teaching Credential and the Single-Subject Teaching Credential (See the Credential Program section of the catalog for more information).

NOTE: As a result of the “No Child Left Behind” federal legislation, individuals pursuing careers as elementary school teachers MUST pass the California Subject Examination for Teachers (CSET) (www.cset.nesinc.com) in order to work in public school classrooms. Child and Adolescent Development majors interested in becoming elementary school teachers should consider selecting elective courses which will prepare them for subject matter areas they will teach (see handouts available in the CADV Department Office and at the Department website).

Course List

CADV 150. Foundations of Child and Adolescent Development (3)
This course surveys typical and atypical child and adolescent development. Readings and coursework provide basic grounding in the major theories/ theorists of human development, an overview of major topics in cognitive, social and physical development as they relate to the culture in children’s development, and develop basic competencies for child observation as a study methodology. (Available for General Education, Social Sciences) (IC)
CADV 196A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses (1-6)
CADV 250. The Child and Adolescent Development Profession (3)
Provides an overview of the history, contemporary status, and projected future of child and adolescent development as a discipline. Contemporary professional issues, advocacy and professionalism in careers that use child and adolescent development as a foundation are investigated.

Upper Division

CADV 350. Applied Cognitive Development (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of lower division writing requirement; Preparatory: CADV 150. Students survey major topics of cognitive development from infancy to adolescence, review research literature about environmental factors that influence children’s cognitive development, and assess the implications for observing and working with children and their families. Students have an opportunity to learn how children’s developing ability to think and articulate can be used as a basis for communicating effectively with them.
CADV 352. Applied Social Development (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of lower division writing requirement; Preparatory: CADV 150. This course surveys human social development from infancy through adolescence. Several theoretical frameworks that inform the study of social development are presented as well as empirical evidence extending knowledge of the processes and content of social development. Emphasis is placed on connecting theories and constructs of social development to effective practice as child and adolescent professionals, the development of observation skills and use of developmentally appropriate practices with children and adolescents in naturalistic settings.
CADV 380. Methods of Child and Adolescent Study (3)
Prerequisites: Completion of lower division writing requirement, MATH 140; Preparatory: CADV 150, CADV 250. Designed to introduce students to the scientific process of studying children and adolescents. Through hands-on experiences, students gain insight into some of the key issues facing researchers, including problems of measurement, observation and interpretation, generation and testable questions, development of coding systems, and establishment of reliability. Students work in small groups to plan and carry out their own research projects at university-affiliated sites.
CADV 394B. Child and Adolescent Development Internship I (2)
Prerequisites: PSY 150, CADV 150, CADV 250; Pre or Co-requisite: CADV 350 OR CADV 352. Students must complete an application (available in Department Office SQ 285) in the spring semester prior to enrolling the following Fall. First of a two-semester internship sequence enabling students to apply theory to practice in a community setting. Internship includes 75 hours of service in a community organization/ setting in addition to regular class meetings. (Credit/No Credit)
CADV 406/L. Enhancing Childhood Creativity and Lab (2/1)
Prerequisite: Corequisite: 406/L. An Integrative seminar and lab experience focusing on the theoretical approaches for enhancing childhood creativity. The uses of play and fantasy are explored as means for developing programs that are child oriented. Regular written assignments are required. (Crosslisted with RTM 406/L)
CADV 450. Helping Children Cope with Medical Environments (3)
Prerequisites: Completion of the Lower Division writing requirement and CADV 150. The developmental impact of illness, disability and hospitalization on children and youth are studied. Methods used by child development specialists to help children cope with the emotional stress of ill health and disability will be presented.
CADV 451. Alternative Approaches to Discipline (3)
Investigation of literature on discipline in child development settings. Practical and theoretical approaches are related and integrated.
CADV 452. Child Advocacy (3)
Designed to increase student knowledge of local, state and national advocacy organizations and their influence on public policy. Focus is on the individual child development professional’s role as a child advocate.
CADV 460. Race, Ethnicity, Gender and Culture in Development (3)
Prerequisites: Completion of lower division writing requirement; Preparatory: CADV 150. Explores the development of ethnic minority children and adolescents in multicultural settings. Particular focus is placed on students’ exploration of their own understandings and awareness of culture, ethnicity, and gender, based on the premise that effective professionals must clearly understand their own personal biases and level of privilege before looking at traits and characteristics of other groups. Specific attention is given to exploring the practical application of these concepts and theories in community settings.
CADV 470. Advanced Theories in Child and Adolescent Development (3)
Prerequisites: Completion of upper division writing exam, CADV 350 or CADV 352. This capstone course is a culminating experience for majors. It facilitates professional development through high level discussions and thinking on concepts and theories of development for transition into graduate-level programs in human development or related fields and/or into a career. Designed to synthesize the broad concepts of child and adolescent development, to address contemporary issues in the field.
CADV 494B. Child and Adolescent Development Internship II (2)
Prerequisites: CADV 394B. The second semester internship builds upon the in-depth understanding of the program and experiences gained from the first semester internship. Individual goals enhance the professional development of students. Includes 75 hours of service in a community setting/organization in addition to regular class meetings. (Credit /No Credit)
CADV 495A. Child and Adolescent Development Graduate School Skills and Applied Research Training I (3)
Prerequisite: Students must complete Department Application. Recommended Preparatory: Completion of lower division writing requirement, and CADV 150, AND CADV 380 or PSY 320/L or FCS 431. This course will address issues associated with becoming a professional in the field of child and adolescent development through developing applied research skills that will facilitate entry into graduate and professional programs in related fields. Students will (1) develop competencies in qualitative and quantitative research methods in studying children and adolescents in both laboratory and field-based settings and (2) gain practical experience applying knowledge of these research methods on actual active Child and Adolescent Development faculty research projects.
CADV 495B. Child and Adolescent Development Graduate School Skills and Applied Research Training II (3)
Prerequisites: CADV 495A or consent of instructor. This course builds on the foundation of applied research methods in CADV 495A by providing opportunities for students to integrate the theories and constructs of applied research in the field of child and adolescent development towards further development of graduate school skills and training. Through participation in weekly seminars in addition to hands-on experience on research projects at varying stages of the research process, this course will provide students in-depth knowledge about particular phases of research (e.g., hypotheses generation, project design, data collection, data analyses, and dissemination). In addition, students will develop a personal statement of their (1) research interests and (2) theoretical grounding in child and adolescent development.
CADV 499. Independent Study (1-3)
Prerequisite: Arranged with the permission of the instructor. Enrollment in an Independent Study is by permission of the Department Chair and with the consent of the instructor who agrees to be a sponsor. Enrollment is granted based on evidence of the student’s ability to work independently on a project. Students who are on probation or who have been disqualified and have not yet completed academic readmission requirements may not enroll in CADV 499 courses. Regular progress meetings with the faculty sponsor and a final written report are required before credit can be given for the course. Please note that the maximum number of units from 499 courses that can be counted toward the baccalaureate degree is six (6) units in a major and three (3) additional units outside the major. Enrollment in an Independent Study is not allowed for the purpose of substitution for an existing course. An Independent Study is related to a major course or study and is not available for meeting a General Education requirement.