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Art

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Mike Curb College of Arts, Media, and Communication

  • Chair: Edward Alfano
  • Associate Chair: Samantha Fields
  • Art and Design Center (ADC) 120
  • (818) 677-2242
  • www.csun.edu/art

Faculty

  • Edward Alfano
  • Tokuroh Arimitsu
  • Betty Ann Brown
  • Owen Doonan
  • Patsy Cox
  • Mark Farquhar
  • Paula DiMarco
  • Samantha Fields
  • Norman Fullner
  • Lynette Henderson
  • James Kelley
  • Lesley Krane
  • Peri Klemm
  • Laurel Long
  • Dave Moon
  • Edie Pistolesi
  • Ron Saito
  • Kenneth Sakatani
  • Mary Ann Trujillo
  • Joy von Wolffersdorff
  • Meiqin Wang

Emeritus Faculty

  • Kim Abeles
  • Robert Bassler
  • Saul Bernstein
  • Jean-Luc Bordeaux
  • Kenon Breazeale
  • John Canavier
  • Bernice Colman
  • Mary Ann Danin
  • William Davis
  • David Elder
  • Bruce Everett,Tom Fricano
  • Marvin Harden
  • Anne Heath
  • Mark Jurey
  • Louise Lewis
  • Donal Lumbert
  • Tom McMillin
  • Philip Morrison
  • Gilbert Rios
  • Donna Ruedy
  • Ruth Schrier
  • Robert Smith
  • Donald Strong
  • Don Sudlow
  • Howard Tollefson
  • Ernest Velardi
  • Robert von Sternberg
  • Art Weiss
  • Birgitta Wohl
  • Morris Zaslavsky

Programs

Undergraduate:

  • B.A., Art
  • Minor in Art

Graduate:

  • M.A., Art
  • Option I: Art Education
  • Option II: Art History
  • Option III: Visual Arts
  • M.F.A., Art
  • Visual Arts
  • Credential in Art

Accreditation

The Department is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design.

The Major

The Department of Art offers a curriculum designed for students wishing a liberal arts education in art and design. Emerging artists have numerous opportunities available to them for expressing their creativity and obtaining employment after graduation. Students may explore several areas of art making and choose the field that best fits their interests and talents.

The curriculum leading up to the B.A. degree is designed for students who are interested in (1) a liberal arts program with an emphasis in art, (2) specialized study in art, (3) preparation for graduate study in art, (4) preparation for academic and professional fields, and/or (5) Art teaching credential preparation.

The lower and upper division core program is required of all Art majors. Students select a minimum of 18 upper division elective units from 1 or more areas of concentration offered in the Art Department in order to complete the B.A. program in their chosen area of study. Experiences are also available outside specialty areas offering students opportunities to sharpen professional skills and increase their marketability.

Careers

The programs in the Department of Art prepare students for a broad range of opportunities in today’s academic, professional, and entertainment fields which include: animation, art writing, art publishing, computer-arts and graphics, graphic design, illustration, museum and gallery practices, packaging design, photography, prototypes, public art, studio arts, teaching and video/film. The Art Education program has a long and successful history of teacher preparation.

Academic Advisement

All art majors are recommended to meet with a faculty advisor each semester. Lower division art majors (29-59 unites) will have a mandatory hold placed on their class registration each semester, requiring an appointment with the department academic advisor for clearance. All students are highly recommended to meet with the academic advisor and their faculty advisor to assure the completion of requirements for graduation. Appointments are booked through the Art Advisement Center located in AC100, (818) 677-2348.

Student Learning Outcomes of the Undergraduate Program

All students will learn:

  • 1. Acquire a basic knowledge, theories, and concepts about art; develop a foundation of art skills and a high level of craftspersonship; communicate ideas and concepts through writing, speaking and art making; acquire a competency with the tools and technologies associated with the visual arts.
  • 2. Broaden knowledge of ancient through contemporary art; develop an understanding of the theoretical, cultural, and historical contexts of art.
  • 3. Apply processes of generating and solving problems in art; analyze, interpret and question traditional methodologies and preconceived notions of art and art making.
  • 4. Explore and engage in interdisciplinary forms of art making.
  • 5. Develop an appreciation and tolerance of diverse perspectives dealing with art, culture, teaching and learning.
  • 6. Become involved in both individual and collaborative art experiences with other students, faculty, and community.
  • 7. Develop a career path for an art profession or an art-related field; develop an understanding of the demands and expectations of that area of art profession or art field.

Student Learning Outcomes of the Master of Arts and Master of Fine Art in Visual Arts Program

All students will:

  • 1. Basic Skills:
  • Master advanced knowledge, theories, and concepts about art; communication ideas and concepts through writing, speaking, and art making.
  • 2. Art Knowledge:
  • Broaden the knowledge of contemporary art and the understanding of the theoretical, cultural and historical contexts of art through writing, speaking, and art making on advanced levels.
  • 3. Critical Thinking:
  • Master processes of generating and solving problems in art; analyze, interpret, and question traditional methodologies and preconceived notions of art and art making on an advanced level.
  • 4. Interdisciplinary Connections:
  • Explore and engage in interdisciplinary forms of art making.
  • 5. Global Perspectives:
  • Develop an appreciation and tolerance of diverse perspectives dealing with art, culture, teaching, and learning.
  • 6. Collaboration:
  • Become involved in both individual and collaborative art experiences among students, faculty, and community.
  • 7. Professional Preparation:
  • Master an understanding of what it means to be a professional artist; develop an advanced understanding of the demands and expectations of the art profession and art field.

Student Learning Outcomes of the Master of Arts in Art History Program

All students will learn:

  • 1.Basic Skills:
  • Master advanced knowledge, theories, and concepts about art history; acquire the ability to develop a research topic in a specific field of art history.
  • 2. Art Knowledge:
  • Broaden the knowledge of historical and contemporary art and the understanding of the theoretical, cultural and historical contexts of art through researching, speaking, and writing on advanced levels.
  • 3. Critical Thinking:
  • Master processes of generating and solving problems in art history writing; analyze, interpret, and question traditional methodologies and preconceived notions of art and art making on an advanced level.
  • 4. Interdisciplinary Connections:
  • Explore and engage in interdisciplinary methodologies through art writing, conversing, or curating.
  • 5. Global Perspectives:
  • Develop an appreciation and tolerance of diverse perspectives dealing with art, culture, teaching and learning.
  • 6. Collaboration:
  • Become involved in both individual and collaborative art experience among students, faculty, and community.
  • 7. Professional Preparation:
  • Master an understanding of what it means to be a professional art historian; develop an advanced understanding of the demands and expectations of the art profession and art field.

We teach our students to experience and value visual thinking and creative problem solving in art, as well as recognize the concurrent importance of perception, experimentation, innovation and critical thinking. Understand the history and traditions of art with their relevance to social and community concerns as well as the art of different cultures. Utilize and interact with the services, facilities and technologies offered throughout the University as well as those provided by the Art Department.

Credential Information

An approved subject matter program leading to a Single Subject teaching credential in art (K-12) is available. The purpose of the subject matter program in art education is to provide students with a strong foundation in and understanding of visual art, and with coursework and field experiences necessary to teach visual art to the diverse public school student populations in the secondary schools of California. The academically rigorous and intellectually stimulating Art Education Program curriculum reflects and builds upon the Visual and Performing Arts Content Standards for California Public Schools K-12: Visual Art (2001) and California State Visual Art Curriculum Framework, and establishes a basis for continued professional development during their teaching career.

For questions about the program, prospective candidates should make an appointment with an advisor in the Art Department Advisement Center by calling (818) 677-2348.

International Study

The Mike Curb College of Arts, Media, and Communication supports the concept of international education and encourages students to investigate opportunities for overseas study. Certain courses taken at CSU International Program Study Centers in foreign countries are equivalent to courses in the Mike Curb College of Arts, Media, and Communication and may be used to fulfill some of the requirements for degree options offered by the College and/or certain general education requirements.

Students should consult the International Programs Bulletin available in Student Development and International Programs departmental advisor, or the campus International Programs Advisor for more information.

Requirements for the B.A. in Art

1. Lower Division Required Courses (15 units)

  • ART 124A Drawing I (3)
  • ART 124B Drawing I (3)
  • ART 140 Beginning 2-Dimensional Design (3)
  • ART 141 Beginning 3-Dimensional Design (3)
  • ART 200 Art, Media, and Visualization (3)
Select two of the following courses: (6 Units)
  • ART 110 World Arts: The Western Tradition (3)
  • ART 112 World Arts: Africa, Oceania, and the Americas (3)
  • ART 114 World Arts: Asia (3)

2. Lower Division Electives (minimum of 6 units)

  • Art electives (100 and 200-level courses)

The selection of lower division electives will be for the purpose of satisfying prerequisites for upper division courses or for sampling areas in which the student might wish to specialize.

3. Upper Division Required Courses (9 units)

  • ART 438 Senior Projects (3)
Art History: Select two of the following:

ART 313, 318, 401, 403, 404, 412, 413, 414, 415, 416, 420, 421, 423, 425, 426, 428, 431, 432, 433, 441, 445, 448, 461, 462, 464, 468

4. Upper Division Electives (18 units)

A minimum of 18 units of upper division courses shall be selected with the aid of an art advisor from 1 or more areas of concentration. It is recommended that students planning to do graduate study in Art complete a minimum of 12 upper division units in 1 area of concentration.

  • ART 200 Introduction to Visual Technology is a prerequisite or co-requisite to the following upper division non-General Education studio courses:
  • ART 301, 302, 308, 322A, 324A, 326, 327, 328, 330, 333, 335, 337B, 337C, 339, 341, 342, 343, 344, 354 and 356.
  • Total Units in the Major
  • 54
  • General Education Units
  • 48
  • Additional Units
  • 18
  • Total Units Required for a B.A. Degree
  • 120

Areas of Concentration

Lower and upper division courses are listed by Areas of Concentration. Students may take any course listed in any area of concentration (provided that they have satisfied course prerequisites or have instructor’s consent.)

Art Education: ART 380, 383, 385, 400, 479, 480, 481, 484, 485, 486 and 487. Note that 479, 484, 485, 486 and 590 are required for the Single Subject Credential in Art.

Art History: ART 311 (does not satisfy the Upper Division Core Requirement for Art majors), 313, 318, 401, 403, 404, 412, 413, 414, 415, 416, 420, 421, 423, 425, 426, 428, 431, 432, 433, 441, 445, 448, 461, 462, 468, 496A-Z.

A. Visual Arts

Ceramics: 267, 366, 367, 467

Drawing: 224AB, 230, 324AB, 330, 424, 430

Painting: 227, 228AB, 326, 327, 328, 427, 429

Printmaking: 237, 337AB, 437

Public Art: 488

Sculpture: 235, 335, 339, 435, 439

Animation: 263, 363A, 363B, 364, 365, 443, 463

Graphic Design: 201, 243, 244, 301, 341, 343, 344, 346, 354, 356, 444, 446, 458, 494, 496A-Z

Illustration: 222, 322ABC, 422

Photography: 250, 350AB, 351, 353, 355, 450, 455ABC.

Video/Digital: 202, 300, 302, 352, 402

Up to 6 units of upper division photojournalism in the Department of Journalism may be applied towards the Art Major when students have taken the prerequisites of ART 250 and one upper division photography class.

B. Additional Courses

Additional Course Offerings Available for Art Major Elective Credit:

  • ART 124C Drawing I (3)
  • ART 148 Color Theory (3)
  • ART 296A-Z Experimental Courses in Art (1-3)
  • ART 308/L Color Application (2/1)
  • ART 342 Exhibition Design (3)
  • ART 481 Art as Therapy (3)
  • ART 487 Puppetry (3)
  • ART 494 Internship in Art (3-3)
  • ART 495 Extended Study (3-3)
  • ART 496A-Z Experimental Topics in Art (1-3)
  • ART 499 Independent Study (maximum of 6 units toward Art degree requirements)

Art courses that do not qualify as credit toward the Art Major:

ART 100, 151, 205, 305, 315

Minor in Art

The Minor has two options, the Standard Option and the Art History Option.

A. Standard Option

1. Lower Division Requirements (12 units)

  • ART 124A Drawing I (3)
  • ART 124B Drawing I (3)
  • ART 140 Beginning 2-Dimensional Design (3)
  • ART 141 Beginning 3-Dimensional Design (3)

2. Upper Division Requirements (12 units)

  • ART 305 Art Today (3)
  • or upper division art history course with consent of advisor (3)
  • Additional Art Electives with consent of advisor
  • 9
  • Total Art Minor (Minimum)
  • 24

B. Art History Option

1. Lower Division Requirements (6-9 units)

  • ART 110 World Arts: The Western Tradition (3)
  • ART 112 World Arts: Africa, Oceania, and the Americas (3)
  • and/or ART 114 World Arts: Asia (3)
  • and/or any lower division studio course.

2. Upper Division Requirements (15-18 units)

Select art history courses and upper division studio courses with approval of an Art History advisor.

  • Total Art Minor (Minimum)
  • 24

Requirements for the Master of Arts Degree

  • Total Units Required: 30

The Master of Arts degree is offered in the following options and areas of concentration:

Option I: Art Education

Option II: Art History

Option III: Visual Arts

(With areas of concentration in Ceramics, Drawing, Illustration, Painting, Photography, Printmaking, Public Art, Sculpture and Video/Digital.)

A. Entrance Requirements

Art Education, Visual Arts Option Requirements:

Bachelor’s in Art from an accredited institution or a Bachelor’s degree with a minimum of 24 units of upper division art or the equivalency as determined by the appropriate Department Graduate Committee. Those who choose Visual Arts option must have completed a minimum of 12 upper division units in one area of concentration.

An undergraduate grade point average of 3.0. Students who have less than 3.0 undergraduate grade point average must complete the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) with a departmentally accepted score.

Students applying to Art Education or Visual Arts areas of concentration who do not meet the undergraduate GPA of 3.0 and do not take the GRE must fulfill the following in-lieu requirements:

  • 1. Submit 3 letters of recommendation from former professors or other persons adjudged by the Department to be competent to evaluate the student’s potential for graduate level performance;
  • 2. Submit a written philosophical statement of intention or purpose (1 or 2 pages);
  • 3. Complete ART 611 or 615 with a minimum grade of B. Art Education students substitute ART 590 for ART 611.

Art History Option Requirements:

  • 1. B.A. in Art History or the equivalent, with a GPA of 3.0 or better, and a minimum of 18 units of upper division art history. If ART 311 Bibliography, Research Methods and Historiography of Art History or its equivalent was not taken as part of the undergraduate major, it must be taken as part of the minimal art history requirements.
  • 2. Three professional recommendations.
  • 3. Written statement of purpose.
  • 4. Personal or telephone interview with an Art History faculty member.
  • 5. Passing score on the GRE (Graduate Record Examination).
  • 6. Two samples of academic writing which demonstrate art historical research skills.

B. Required for Classified Graduate Status

  • 1. Pass the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam.
  • 2. Students who choose the Art Education option must have their portfolio evaluated and approved by the appropriate Art Education Graduate Committee. They must pass a personal screening interview conducted by the appropriate Art Education Graduate Committee [or designee(s)].
  • 3. Students who choose the Visual Arts option must have their portfolio evaluated and approved by the Visual Arts Graduate Committee. If the student’s portfolio is not accepted, 2 additional submissions are allowed.
  • 4. Students who choose the Art History option must pass the Foreign Language Reading Exam in French or German and the Art History Comprehensive Exam. In addition, they must complete 12 units of Art History at the 400-level or above, including at least 1 class at the 500 or 600-level. Upon reaching Classified status, students must form a thesis committee and select a thesis advisor. Students must complete an additional 12 units at the 500 or 600-level which must include ART 611, ART 615, and two semesters of ART 619.
  • 5. Students in Art Education, Visual Arts options whose undergraduate GPA was below 3.0, and do not take the GRE, must have fulfilled all in-lieu requirements.

C. Requirements for the Degree

  • 1. Select a graduate advisor and thesis committee.
  • 2. Complete the Program for Master of Arts form with approval of Graduate Advisor.
  • 3. Meet at least once a semester with thesis committee to demonstrate satisfactory progress toward the degree.
  • 4. Completion of a minimum of 30 units of approved graduate work comprised of the following:

Approved student programs shall include a minimum of 21 units of graduate coursework (500 and 600-level) .

A. Required Courses (6 units)
  • ART 611 History and Philosophy of Art (3)
  • or ART 590 History and Philosophy of Art Education (3)
  • ART 615 Art Analysis and Criticism (3)
  • B. For the Visual Arts option, select courses in area of concentration. Student must select an area of concentration from the following (12 units):

Ceramics, Drawing, Graphic Design (MFA only), Illustration, Painting, Photography, Printmaking, Public Art, Sculpture, and Video/Digital Art.

C. Graduate Level Elective Courses

  • ART 500 History of Art Museums and Collecting in Western Civilization (3)
  • ART 502 Art Museum Practices (3-3)
  • ART 520 Studio Problems: Video/Digital Art (3-3-3-3)
  • ART 521 Studio Problems: Painting (3-3-3-3)
  • ART 522 Studio Problems: Illustration (3-3)
  • ART 524 Studio Problems: Drawing (3-3-3-3)
  • ART 525 Studio Problems: Printmaking (3-3-3-3)
  • ART 535 Studio Problems: Sculpture (3-3-3-3)
  • ART 544 Studio Problems: Graphic Design (3-3-3-3)
  • ART 550 Studio Problems: Photography (3-3-3-3)
  • ART 540 Studio Problems: Design (3-3-3-3)
  • ART 560 Studio Problems: Ceramics (3-3-3-3)
  • ART 588 Studio Problems: Public Art (3-3-3-3)
  • ART 619 Seminar in Art History (3-3)
  • ART 620 Advanced Studio Problems: Video/Digital Art (3-3-3-3)
  • ART 621 Advanced Studio Problems: Painting (3-3-3-3)
  • ART 622 Advanced Studio Problems: Illustration (3-3)
  • ART 624 Advanced Studio Problems: Drawing (3-3-3-3)
  • ART 625 Advanced Studio Problems: Printmaking (3-3-3-3)
  • ART 635 Advanced Studio Problems: Sculpture (3-3-3-3)
  • ART 640 Advanced Studio Problems: Design (3-3-3-3)
  • ART 644 Advanced Studio Problems: Graphic Design (3-3-3-3)
  • ART 650 Advanced Studio Problems: Photography (3-3-3-3)
  • ART 660 Advanced Studio Problems: Ceramics (3-3-3-3)
  • ART 688 Advanced Studio Problems: Public Art (3-3-3-3)
  • ART 681A/B Seminar in Art Education (3-3)
  • ART 686 Research in Art Education (3-3)
  • ART 696A-C Directed Graduate Research (1-3)
  • ART 699A-C Independent Study (1-3)

Students in Art Education and Art History may apply approved 400-level courses toward their area of concentration.

(Not applicable in the Studio areas of concentration)

D. Courses in related and/or outside field (9 units)

These are to be selected, with the approval of the advisor, from 400, 500, 600- level courses in art or related fields.

  • 5. Thesis, project or artistic performance
  • ART 698C (3)
  • Art History Option: ART 698C (3-3)
  • 6. Oral examination, if deemed necessary by the appropriate departmental Graduate Committee.
  • Total Units Required for the M.A. Degree
  • 30

Requirements for the Master of Fine Arts Degree

  • Total Units Required: 60 Units

Selection for admission into the MFA program is conducted by the Visual Arts Graduate Committee. This selection occurs once a year, with applications submitted directly to the Art Department, due the second Friday in February for admission the following Fall semester. The Master of Fine Arts (MFA) in Art is offered in the following areas of concentration: Visual Arts Option with areas of concentration in Ceramics, Drawing, Graphic Design, Illustration, Painting, Photography, Printmaking, Public Art, Sculpture, and Video/Digital Art.

A. Requirements for Classified Graduate Status

  • Students must meet all Classified Graduate Status requirements in order to enter the program.
  • 1. Bachelor’s degree in Art from an accredited institution or a bachelor’s degree with a minimum of 24 units of upper division art, or the equivalency, as determined by the Visual Arts Graduate Committee.
  • 2. Undergraduate grade point average of 3.0. Students who do not meet the undergraduate GPA of 3.0 must do the following:
  • a. Complete the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) with a departmentally accepted score.
  • b. Students who do not meet the undergraduate GPA of 3.0 and do not take the GRE must fulfill the following in-lieu requirements:
  • i. Submit 3 letters of recommendation from former professors or other persons adjudged by the department to be competent to evaluate the student’s potential for graduate- level performance;
  • ii. Submit a written philosophical statement of intention (1 to 2 pages);
  • iii. Complete Art 611 or 615 with a minimum grade of B;
  • iv. Pass a personal screening interview conducted by the Visual Arts Graduate Committee [or designee(s)].
  • 3. Completion of 18 advisor approved units of upper division and/or graduate course work in the proposed emphasized area of concentration.
  • 4. Completion of a minimum of 12 units of Art History, 6 units of which must be upper division.
  • 5. With the approval of the Visual Arts Graduate Committee, up to 30 units of previously completed graduate course work with a grade of B or better may be allowed towards the MFA degree (thesis grade excluded).
  • 6. Successful completion of a Qualifying Portfolio Evaluation approved by the Visual Arts Graduate Committee, with emphasis in the proposed area(s) of concentration. A Statement of Intent and a resume will be submitted with the portfolio.
  • 7. Pass the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam.

B. Classified Student Requirements

  • 1. Select a graduate advisor and thesis committee.
  • 2. Complete the Program for Master of Fine Arts form with approval of graduate advisor.
  • 3. Meet at least once a semester with thesis committee to demonstrate satisfactory progress toward Advancement to Candidacy.
  • 4. Completion of a minimum total of 60 units of graduate work in approved graduate courses

Department Graduate Level Courses

Visual Arts (39 units*)
  • 1. All student programs must emphasize one to three area(s) of concentration.
  • 2. The student’s graduate advisor must be from one of the selected area(s) of concentration.
  • 3. All units taken from the program must be approved by a graduate advisor.
  • 4. A minimum of 12 units must be from the area(s) of concentration specifically emphasized in the student’s Qualifying Portfolio Evaluation. Students wishing to change their emphasized area of concentration must retake the Qualifying Portfolio Evaluation and demonstrate entry-level competence in the area of concentration they would like to organize. They should then request a graduate advisor in that area of concentration.
  • 5. All student programs must emphasize from one to three specialization(s), two to three are recommended. The student’s graduate advisor must be from one of the selected specializations.

Visual Arts

Ceramics, Drawing, Graphic Design, Illustration, Photography, Printmaking, Public Art, Sculpture, Video/Digital Art

A minimum of 36 units must be completed from one to three specialization(s).

Required Courses (9 units)
  • ART 611 History and Philosophy of Art (3)
  • ART 615 Art Analysis and Criticism (3)
  • ART 691A-Z MFA Seminar** (3)
Department Graduate Level Courses

In addition to the courses listed under the M.A. program under III Requirements for the Degree, the MFA program also includes the following:

  • ART 690A-Z MFA Studio*** (3-3-3-3)
  • ART 698 MFA Thesis/Artistic Performance (3)

*39 unit total includes 3 units of ART 698 Thesis/Artistic Performance.

**Three units required; repeatable as an elective for a total of 12 units.

***ART 690 MFA Studio is not a separate area of concentration. It allows continued course work for classified MFA students in their area(s) of concentration.

Electives (12 units)

All elective courses must be selected in consultation with graduate advisor. Select from the following:

  • ART 400-699C Elective Courses in Art (3-3)
  • ART 691A-Z MFA Seminar (3-3-3-3)
  • ART 696A-C Graduate Directed Research (1- 3)

Additional elective courses outside the area(s) of concentration may be selected with advisor approval.

C. MFA Advancement to Candidacy

  • 1. Advancement to Candidacy takes place when the required preparatory course work is completed, and the student is prepared to advance to the final Thesis/Artistic Performance phase of the degree requirements.
  • 2. Prerequisites to Advancement to Candidacy are:
  • a. Successful completion of periodic work-in-progress evaluations.
  • b. Classified graduate standing with a minimum grade point average of 3.0 in all work undertaken for the program.
  • c. The removal of any incompletes or completion of satisfactory progress (SP) grades.
  • d. Successful completion of the Advancement to Candidacy Portfolio Evaluation approved by the student’s thesis committee.
  • e. Department approval of the Plan for Thesis Project, prior to registration for ART 698 MFA Thesis or Artistic Performance.

MFA Transfer and Residency Policy

  • 1. Transfer credit allowable toward the MFA is not to exceed 30 graduate units. The Visual Arts Graduate Committee approves all transfer credits.
  • 2. Only courses in which the student receives a minimum grade of B may be transferred.
  • 3. Only courses completed in the last 7 years may apply to the degree.
  • 4. MFA candidates must complete a minimum residency consisting of 18 graduate units in their designated area(s) of concentration.
Elective Courses

Refer to the Graduate-Level Elective courses. Students may take 400-level courses outside their area(s) of concentration with graduate advisor approval. No new elective courses are needed for implementation

  • Total Units Required for the MFA Degree
  • 60

Credential Information

Contact the Art Department Advisement Center at (818) 677-2348 for information about the Art Subject Matter Program for the Single Subject Credential.

  • 1. Choose an Area of Concentration
  • 2. Lower Division Core Program
  • 3. Upper Division Core program
  • 4. Grade of B or better in ART 479, 484, 485, 486 and 590
  • 5. Minimum of 54 units in Art
  • 6. Art Department Contract form, approved by an Art Advisor
  • 7. Portfolio review and interview
  • 8. Overall GPA of 2.75 or higher
  • 9. GPA of 2.75 or higher in Art Subject Matter Program courses for the Single Subject Credential

Course List

ART 100/L. Introduction to Art Processes and Lab (1/2)
Corequisite: ART 100L. Not available for Art Major credit. Experiences for the non-art major in drawing, painting, sculpture and other art processes. Provides an understanding of the place of art in life through actual participation. 1 hour discussion; 4 hours studio. (Available for General Education, Arts and Humanities)
ART 110. World Arts: The Western Tradition (3)
Survey of the visual arts of the Western cultural tradition from ancient to modern times emphasizing historical, religious and socio-cultural contexts. Discussion, research, and writing on the visual arts, including painting, sculpture, architecture, book arts, ceramics, textiles, and body arts. For non-art major. (Available for General Education, Arts and Humanities)
ART 112. World Arts: Africa, Oceania and the Americas (3)
Survey of the visual arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas emphasizing historical, religious and socio-cultural contexts. Discussion, research and writing on the visual arts, including painting, sculpture, architecture, book arts, ceramics, textiles, and body arts. For non-art major. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultures)
ART 113. Architectural Drafting (3)
Prerequisite for Art majors: ART 141. Non-art majors consult department for equivalency. Developing skills in documenting architectural concepts through the use of models, designs, plans, and symbols. Developing an awareness of current concepts and conventions in architecture through practice, discussion, and direct observation. Media include pencil, ink, ozylite and computer assisted drafting. Emphasis on working drawings, models. Six hours per week.
ART 114. World Arts: Asia (3)
Survey of the visual arts of India, China, Japan, Korea and Southeast Asia emphasizing historical, religious and socio-cultural contexts. Discussion, research, and writing on the visual arts, including painting, sculpture, architecture, book arts, ceramics, textiles, and body arts. (Available for General Education, Arts and Humanities)
ART 120/L. Arts Immersion: Visual Art and Lab (1/1)
Prerequisite: Restricted to students in the ITEP Freshman Option Program. Corequisite: ART 120L. Introduction to the study of visual arts foundation skills, concepts, and ideas, based upon the Visual and Performing Arts Framework, and the Visual and Performing Arts Content Standards for California Public Schools. Foundation study in the visual arts includes application of the creative processes and skills, responding to and deriving meaning from works of art, and developing an understanding of art in historical and cultural context. One hour of lecture per week; two hours of lab per week.
ART 124A. Drawing I (3)
Introduction to basic drawing experiences. Graphic representation of objects stressed through a variety of techniques and media. Emphasis on form, structure, values, line, and systems of perspective and space. For non-art major; 5 hours lab. (Available for General Education, Arts and Humanities)
ART 124B. Drawing I (3)
Prerequisite: ART 124A. Basic drawing experiences dealing with the human figure. Emphasis on form, structure, proportions, gesture, and systems of perspective and space. 5 hours per week.
ART 124C. Drawing I (3)
Prerequisite: ART 124A or instructor consent. Introduction to rendering as it applies to various fields of design. Projects include rendering materials and techniques and methods of design presentation. 5 hours per week.
ART 140. Beginning Two-Dimensional Design (3)
Introduction to the elements and principles of 2-dimensional design which are common to the visual arts. Foundation course stressing visual perception and an effective knowledge of the graphic means of expression and communication. 5 hours per week. (Available for General Education, Arts and Humanities)
ART 141. Beginning Three-Dimensional Design (3)
Study of the elements and principles of 3-dimensional design and their applications, with emphasis on form in space, design systems, and contemporary art concepts. Experimentation in both natural and synthetic material. For non-art major; 5 hours per week. (Available for General Education, Arts and Humanities)
ART 148. Color Theory (3)
Prerequisite: ART 140. Introduction to basic theories of color. Investigations of color harmony and its development as applied to two and 3-dimensional visual form. Introductory studies of physiological and psychological aspects of color are investigated. 5 hours per week.
ART 151. Photography as Art (3)
Not available for Art Major credit. Students must provide their own digital camera (SLR or compact digital). Introduction for non-art majors to the subject matter and aesthetics of photography. Review of artists’ works that have been a major influence in the field and which reflect broader issues in visual culture. Assignments include learning basic camera anatomy, functions, and digital applications. Students need basic working knowledge of computer operation. (Available for General Education, Lifelong Learning)
ART 200. Art, Media, and Visualization (3)
Practical study of the way art, technology, and theories in visual representation shape contemporary visual practice.
ART 201. Introduction to Web Art (3)
This course is an introduction to web art and design. In addition to an exposure to the history of the web/internet, the course will cover basic web development tools, terminology and aesthetics. Students will create web pages using current computer web applications. For non Art majors. (Available for General Education, Lifelong Learning).
ART 202. Introduction to Video/Digital Art (3)
Prerequisite: ART 200. Introduction to the uses of time-based media as a means of personal expression. Investigations into basic concepts in digital media result in short artistic statements presented in video/digital format. 5 hours lab.
ART 222. Illustration Materials and Techniques (3)
Prerequisites: ART 124B. Introduction to the use of materials and techniques used in a variety of art areas and specifically in the field of illustration. Emphasis on understanding media potential and the development of refined technical skills required for the successful execution of illustrations. Covers wide range of wet and dry media tools and techniques. 5 hours lab.
ART 224A Drawing II: Anatomy (3)
Prerequisite: ART 124B. Study of the human form and its graphic representation. Problems dealing with anatomy, form and structure introduced by studies of the posed model. 5 hours per week.
ART 224B. Drawing II: Portraiture (3)
Prerequisite: Art 124B. Study of human form with emphasis on hands and the head. Investigation of traditional techniques and concepts of portraiture. 5 hours per week.
ART 227. Painting I (3)
Prerequisite: Art majors. Recommended Corequisite or Preparatory: ART 140. Non-art majors consult department for equivalency. Emphasis on 2-dimensional pictorial structure. Application of design fundamentals to graphic space, organization and imagery. Use of various painting media. 5 hours per week.
ART 228A. Painting Techniques and Media (3)
Prerequisites: ART 140; 227. Study of 2-dimensional media and materials with emphasis on traditional concepts, form, imagery. Materials such as encaustic, tempera, watercolor, oils, etc., are used. 5 hours per week.
ART 228B. Painting Techniques and Media (3)
Prerequisite: Art majors. Recommended Corequisite or Preparatory: ART 140. Non-art majors consult department for equivalency. Study of 2-dimensional media and materials with emphasis on new materials and their expressive potential. Uses contemporary materials such as acrylics, plastics, fabric, natural and modern industrial materials. 5 hours per week.
ART 230. Perspective (3)
Prerequisite: Art majors, ART 124A. Non-art majors consult department for equivalency. Understanding and use of various systems of perspective. Emphasis upon linear perspective and applications to rendering which are based upon uses of perspective. 5 hours per week.
ART 235. Sculpture I (3)
Prerequisites: Art majors; ART 141. Non-art majors consult department for equivalency. Introduction to a variety of sculptural concepts. Involvement in basic processes, including modeling, casting, carving, and construction. 5 hours lab.
ART 237. Printmaking I (3)
Prerequisites: Art majors; ART 140. Non-Art majors: 140. Introduction to the materials and basic processes of printmaking with a thorough exploration of monotypes and relief techniques, including wood and linoleum cutting and other processes. 5 hours lab.
ART 243. Introduction to Typography (3)
Prerequisites: ART 140; Corequisite: ART 200. History, theory and practice of letter forms and typography as they apply to graphics, advertising and other areas of design and visual communication. Projects cover principles of typography, letter structure, typeface selection, fundamentals of computer typesetting, and typographic layout. Fee required. 5 hours lab.
ART 244. Graphic Design I (3)
Introductory survey to the professional field of advertising and graphic design as related to print, multimedia, entertainment, environmental and other areas of visual communications. Emphasis on fundamental principles and skills with a broad approach to the application of techniques and concepts of the field. 5 hours lab. Course fee.
ART 250. Photography I (3)
Basic instruction in the creative use of the camera and printing techniques. Instruction in basic principles and darkroom experience. Emphasis on photography as a fine art, stressing beginning visual awareness and craftsmanship. 5 hours lab.
ART 263. Animation I (3)
Introduction to the fundamental principles of animation which are the basis for traditional and computer animation. Hand drawn exercises are utilized to learn timing, motion and weights. Covers introduction to the early history of animation. 5 hours lab.
ART 267. Introduction to Ceramics (3)
Basic methods of hand building and wheel-forming. Emphasis on designing, decorating, glazing, and firing procedures. 5 hours lab.
ART 272. Fiber Art/fabric Design I (3)
Prerequisites: Art majors: ART 141. Non-art majors consult department for equivalency. Introduction to fabric and fiber processes and materials. Basic concepts, materials and methods of fabric and fiber. Emphasis on design and execution. 5 hours lab.
ART 277. Design in Wood I (3)
Prerequisite: Art majors: ART 141. Non-art majors consult department for equivalency. Basic course exploring the use of wood as a design medium. Studio experiences. Emphasis on design within the limitations of the material and tools. 5 hours lab.
ART 296A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in Art (1-3)
Experimental courses in Art with course content to be determined.
ART 300. Digital Technologies in Art (3)
Prerequisite: ART 200. Exploration of the use of digital media in art and design. Provides practical experience in designing digital media products. 5 hours lab.
ART 301. Web Design (3)
Prerequisite: ART 200; Art 201 or 244 preparatory. Introduction to principles and techniques for visual and information design for websites. Includes an introduction to website animation technologies. 5 hours lab.
ART 302. Video/Digital Art (3-3)
Prerequisite: ART 200 or 202. Studies into artistic concepts and technologies involved in the creation of video art, and digital time-based art forms. Investigations into digital imaging, non-linear compositing and visual effects result in the creation of short artistic statements presented in video/digital format. 5 hours lab.
ART 304/L. Visual Art and the Child (1/1)
Prerequisites: ART 120/L; restricted to students in the ITEP?Freshman Option Program. Provides students with the opportunity to revisit visual art and apply their knowledge of this area to working with children in a school setting. Students extend and integrate their knowledge of visual arts foundation skills, concepts, and ideas, based upon the Visual and Performing Arts Framework, and the Visual and Performing Arts Content Standards for California Public Schools. Experiences include planning, teaching, assessing art lessons in field based settings. Students also engage in critical analysis and reflection to discover ways to guide children in both the creation of art and thoughtful appreciation of art.
ART 305. Art Today (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Not available for Art Major credit. Art majors may take this course for university elective credit. Introduction for the non-art major to the art, design and architecture of our time. Illustrated lectures explore the development, techniques and ideas underlying the contemporary visual environment. (Available for General Education, Arts and Humanities) (IC)
ART 306. Motion Graphics (3)
This course is an introduction to Motion Graphics, which includes the categories of commercial, broadcast, main sequence and music video. The course will include lectures, showcases and demonstrations of the history, techniques and applications of motion graphics. Projects will cover design, composition, narrative and sound development. Current industry standard computer applications will be introduced and applied. This course may be repeated twice for credit. 5 hours lab.
ART 308/L. Color Application and Lab (2/1)
Prerequisite: ART 140; ART 200, Corequisite ART 308L. Exploration of the theories of color with emphasis on its application to a wide range of artistic formats. Functions of color and its associative aspects are studied in studio activities. Two hours discussion; two hours studio.
ART 311. Bibliography, Research Methods and Historiography of Art History (3)
Prerequisites: ART 110. Seminar designed to acquaint the student with basic bibliography, methods of research, and the historiography of art history. Required of all students who specialize in Art History within the art major. Does not satisfy upper division core requirement for Art majors.
ART 313. History of Design (3)
Study of important developments in the history of design: architecture and ornament, interior and furniture, decorative arts, textile design, industrial design, product design and graphic design. (Offered Fall semester)
ART 314. Furniture Design and Construction (2)
Prerequisites: ART 141; 124C. Wood and metal construction for Interior Design students. Study of wood, metal and synthetics and their nature in the processes and techniques of furniture and object making. 5 hours lab.
ART 315. Perspectives in Art History (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement. Not available for Art Major credit. Introduction for non-art majors. Art as a means of examining western civilization from prehistory to the present. Comparative study of the visual/plastic arts from the historical perspectives of their function in society. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies) (IC)
ART 318. Survey of 19th and 20th Century Arts (3)
Prerequisite: Art 110. A survey of major movements in nineteenth- and twentieth-century art and art theory with reference to social, political, economic, and ideological contexts. Included are visits to major museums, galleries, and performance art venues in the Los Angeles area.
ART 322A. Illustration I (3)
Prerequisites: ART 222; Art 200. Basic principles and practices of publication and advertising illustration. Projects emphasize conceptual problem-solving, composition and the development of personal style. Projects are designed for inclusion in a professional portfolio. 5 hours lab.
ART 322B. Illustration II (3)
Prerequisite: ART 322A. Techniques used in illustration, emphasis upon problem solving and the development of skills necessary in illustration for publication and advertising. 5 hours lab.
ART 322C. Digital Illustration (3-3)
Recommended Preparatory Course: ART 322A. The study and practice of digital illustration that uses both traditional fine art media and digital technology. Emphasis is on illustration problem-solving, experimental techniques and the development of portfolio quality illustrations. 5 hours of laboratory.
ART 324A. Drawing III: Figure Drawing (3)
Prerequisites: ART 124A; 124B; ART 200. Study of the human figure using models. Emphasis on creative interpretation of structure, gesture and space as they relate to the elements of line, form, value and color. 5 hours per week.
ART 324B. Drawing III: Figure Drawing and (3)
Prerequisite: ART 324A. Study of the human figure using models. Emphasis on creative interpretation of structure, gesture and space as they relate to the elements of line, form, value and color. Introduction to a broad range of problems in the combined area of drawing and painting which are non-linear and apply to the study of human form. 5 hours per week.
ART 326. Painting II: Abstract Painting (3)
Prerequisites: ART 227; ART 200. Emphasis on an individuality of response to contemporary problems in painting incorporating a variety of media, techniques and concepts related to abstract painting. 5 hours per week.
ART 327. Painting II: Representational Imagery (3)
Prerequisites: ART 227; ART 200. Emphasis on individuality of response to contemporary problems in painting, incorporating a variety of media, techniques, and content related to representational imagery.
ART 328. Water Color (3-3)
Prerequisites: ART 200. Corequisite: upper division standing; portfolio review required for repeat credit. Transparent and opaque watercolor techniques. Emphasis on technical proficiency and creative expressions. 5 hours per week.
ART 330. Drawing III: Composition (3-3)
Prerequisites: ART 124A, 124B, 140; ART 200. Problems, utilizing various drawing media and techniques, stressing the elements of 2-dimensional composition and pictorial organization. 5 hours per week.
ART 335. Sculpture II (3-3)
Prerequisites: ART 141 and 235; ART 200. Further exploration of sculpture concepts and media, with emphasis on individual invention. 5 hours lab.
ART 337A. Printmaking II: Intaglio (3)
Prerequisite: ART 237. Intaglio methods, including collagraph, on metal and related materials. Color processes. 5 hours lab.
ART 337B. Printmaking II: Serigraphy (Silkscreen) (3)
Prerequisites: ART 237; ART 200. Methods and materials used to create stencils for multi-color registration and printing including photo processing. Nine hours lab.
ART 337C. Printmaking II: Lithography (3)
Prerequisites: ART 237; ART 200. Lithographic methods on stone or metal plates. Black/white and color processes. 5 hours lab.
ART 339. Figure and Portrait Sculpture (3-3)
Prerequisites: ART 235; ART 200 Corequisite. Preparatory: 124B. Exploration of various 3-dimensional means of expression utilizing the human body. Direct modeling from life in clay and wax. Emphasis on structural analysis and personal interpretation of the figure. Experience in armature construction, mold making and casting techniques. Nine hours lab.
ART 341. Graphic Design Production (3)
Prerequisites: ART 244; ART 200. Production mechanics of designed projects are prepared for offset printing and digital reproduction. In-depth review of color separations, ink, paper, and current trends in print production as well as digital reproduction and multi media. 5 hours lab.
ART 342. Exhibition Design (3)
Prerequisites: ART 140 or 141; ART 200. Study of techniques of exhibition design. Problems of design and production in projects that emphasize creating gallery and related exhibitions or venues. Some sections of this course may offer a community service opportunity with activities relating to concepts and theories presented. Check the schedule of classes for the CS designation. 5 hours per week.
ART 343. Advanced Typography (3-3)
Prerequisites: Art 243; 244. Theory and practice of letter forms and typography as they apply to graphics, advertising and other areas of design and visual communication. Projects cover principles of typography, letter structure, type face selection, fundamentals of computer typesetting, and typographic layout. 5 hours lab.
ART 344. Graphic Design II (3-3)
Prerequisite: ART 244; Corequisite: ART 200. Preparatory: ART 341 or equivalent. Introduction to intermediate skills and conceptual problems of the field. Stressed is the integration of theory with practical applications. Projects demand creative solutions to typical problems faced by the graphic designer. 5 hours lab.
ART 350A-B. Photography II (3-3)
Preparatory for (A): ART 200; 250. Preparatory for (B) ART 350A. Continuation of the principles learned in Photography I with more advanced problems. Students explore the medium more fully through experience with slide making, multiple imagery, solarization, and other techniques. History and heritage of photography is integrated into the course. 5 hours lab.
ART 351. Digital Photo Imaging (3-3)
Prerequisite: ART 250; ART 200 Preparatory. Exploration of digital photography, integrating established principles of the photo medium with digital technologies. Photo images are created and manipulated through digital software processes for both fine art and commercial application. Assignments result in a portfolio. May be repeated once for credit; 5 hours lab.
ART 352. Visual Effects (3-3)
Prerequisite: ART 302. Studies in the conceptualization and techniques of digitally generated visual effects in time-based media. Creative self-expression is emphasized in the production of experimental short videos.
ART 353. Color Photography (3-3)
Preparatory: ART 200, 250 or equivalent. Investigation into the various aspects of color photography which include: exposure and development of negative film; printing with color materials utilizing the subtractive color principles which underlie color filtration and correction; a brief survey of contemporary color photographers with an emphasis on the aesthetics of their works; refinement of the students’ visual eye while pursuing their own stylistic expression. May be repeated once for credit. 5 hours lab.
ART 354. Computer Graphics (3-3)
Prerequisites: ART 200; 244. Non-art majors consult department for equivalency. Application and principles of computer graphics as a creative technological medium. Practical experience with micro-computers in studying the potentials of graphic communication and visual expression. 5 hours lab.
ART 355. Large Format Photography (3)
Exploration of the various aspects of large format (4” x 5”) photography including camera operation, darkroom techniques, and artificial lighting. Emphasis on exercising control over all aspects of the image making process, including recognizing visual problems and selecting the appropriate techniques to bring about their solution. Addresses wide range of photographic situations. 5 hours lab.
ART 356. Computer Publishing Design (3-3)
Prerequisite: ART 244; Corequisite: ART 200. Application of graphic design principles to computer generated page layout. Using current software applications, covers design of text documents, graphic elements, and their incorporation into page layouts. Emphasis on the use of the computer for decision-making and experimentation. 5 hours lab.
ART 363A. Animation II (3)
Prerequisite: ART 263. Further study of animation skills for both traditional and computer animation. Introduction to storyboard process, character design, story development. Intermediate level animation principles including, character expression, lip sync, and staging. Continuation of animation history 1943 to the present. 5 lab hours.
ART 363B. Animation II (3)
Intermediate animation emphasizing concept development in preparation for a 3-D computer or 2-D animation project. Includes research, story development, character design, timing studies, scenic design and storyboards. Work culminates in a process book and animatic. 5 hours lab.
ART 364. 3-D Computer Animation (3-3)
Prerequisite: ART 263. Investigation of 3-D computer animation with emphasis on animation timing, modeling and lighting. 5 hours lab.
ART 365. 3-D Computer Animation II (3-3)
Prerequisite: ART 364. Intermediate study of 3-D Computer Animation with focus on 3-D Character creation and animation. Includes: design, modeling, rigging, key-frame lip sync acting, background, lighting, texturing, coloring and critical analysis of 3-D characters from the Game and Animation field. 5 hours lab.
ART 366. Ceramics II (3-3)
Prerequisites: ART 267. Investigation of the use of clay as a medium with an emphasis on sculptural applications. Discussion of ideas, technical processes and approaches as they relate to clays use as a non-utilitarian medium. Experimentation with mold making, casting, clay bodies, glaze formulation and surface treatments. 5 lab hours. Course fee.
ART 367. Ceramics III (3-3)
Prerequisites: ART 267. Further investigation of the use of clay as a medium with emphasis on experimental practice. Further discussion of ideas, technical processes and approaches as it relates to the work and contemporary visual art. Continued experimentation with wheel forming, hand building, clay bodies, glaze formulation and surface treatments. 5 lab hours. Course fee.
ART 368. Game Animation and Design (3)
Investigation of the creative process of game design and game animation. Practical, theoretical, and global aspects of game design will be explored by creating game assets and producing animation work. 9 hours lab. Recommended preparatory courses: ART 365.
ART 372. Fiber Art/Fabric Design II (3)
Prerequisites: ART 200; 272. Continuing study of fiber art and fabric design processes involving weaving, off loom, basic printing and dyeing with emphasis on aesthetics and design. 5 hours lab.
ART 377. Design in Wood II (3-3)
Prerequisites: ART 141; 200; 277. Studio problems in wood design and fabrication. Emphasis on problem solution consistent with principles of good design and artistic technical proficiency. Contemporary solutions will require review of historical developments in the medium. 5 hours lab.
ART 380/L. Children’s Art and Lab (2/1)
Prerequisite: Junior standing. Corequisite: ART 380L. Recommended for Multiple Subjects Credential Candidates. Development of fundamentals and principles for determining art experiences for children. Understanding the significance of art in the child’s development. Emphasis on developing basic art skills in criticism, aesthetics, history, and studio production. Two hours discussion, two hours studio, and visits to art exhibitions.
ART 383/L. Art in Early Childhood and Lab (2/1)
Prerequisite: Junior standing. Corequisite: ART 383L. Analysis and discussion of the significance of art in the development of young children ages 3 through 8 combined with studio experiences in two and 3-dimensional materials. Two hours discussion, two hours studio.
ART 385/L. Children’s Crafts and Lab (2/1)
Prerequisite: Junior standing. Corequisite: ART 385L. Basic skills and understandings which provide meaningful craft experiences for children. Emphasis on the educational value of crafts. Beginning techniques and processes involving 3-dimensional materials. Two hours discussion, two hours studio.
ART 396A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in Art (1-3)
ART 400/L. Developing Visual Literacy and Lab (2/1)
Prerequisites: ART 380; Junior standing. Corequisite: ART 400L. In-depth exploration of selected art processes culminating in a significant research paper or project. Two hours discussion, two hours studio.
ART 401. History of Native North American Art (3)
The visual arts of North American native cultures from the Eskimo to Canada, the Northwest and Southwest areas of the United States, the Plains, and Eastern Indian societies.
ART 402. Advanced Video/digital Art (3-3)
Preparatory: ART 302. Advanced studies into video/digital art involve exploration into a broad range of artistic concepts and visual technologies utilized in video/digital media, and time-based art forms. Investigation into art software applications and experimental methods lead to the production and refinement of artistic statements presented in video/digital format. 5 hours lab.
ART 403. History of Latin American Art (3)
Survey of Latin American arts from pre-classic cultures in Central and South America through the evolution of high cultures to the Conquest. Art and architecture of the colonial period to the modern.
ART 404. History of African and Oceania Art (3)
Visual arts of sub-Saharan tribal Africa considered in their cultural context, including related art forms, such as literature, music, and ritual observances. Arts of the South Pacific, the tribal societies of Melanesia, Polynesia, Micronesia, and Australia.
ART 412. History of Korean Art (3)
Prerequisite: Upper division standing. Arts of Korea from the Neolithic period through the Choson period. Intensive investigation of the visual arts of the Korean peninsula including the definition of native characteristics, the understanding of the impact of Buddhism and Confucianism, a look at the relationships between elite and popular art, and the examination of the country’s greatest artistic legacy, ceramics.
ART 413. History of Chinese Art (3)
Prerequisite: Upper division standing. Art and architecture of China from the Neolithic period to the fall of the Manchu Dynasty.
ART 414. History of Japanese Art (3)
Prerequisite: Upper division standing. Art and architecture of Japan from the Neolithic period to the end of the Edo (Tokugawa) period.
ART 415. History of the Art of India (3)
Prerequisite: Upper division standing. Art and architecture of India from prehistoric times to the 19th century. Intensive investigation of Buddhist and Hindu art forms and their expansion in Asia and an examination of the Indian Islamic arts.
ART 416. History of Ancient Near Eastern Art (3)
Prerequisite: Upper division standing. Study of the architecture, sculpture, and related art forms of the ancient Near East, Mesopotamia, Anatolia, and Iran from prehistoric times to the beginning of the Sassanian Empire.
ART 420. History of Greek Art and Architecture (3)
Prerequisite: Upper division standing. Art and architecture of the Aegean area from the early Archaic to the end of the Hellenistic Periods.
ART 421. History of Roman Art and Architecture (3)
Prerequisite: Upper division standing. Art and architecture of the Roman World from circa 700 B.C. to 400 A.D.
ART 422. Illustration III (3-3-3-3)
Prerequisites: ART 322B. Advanced study of specific problems in publication and advertising illustration. Projects require the creative implementation of the ideas, media and techniques used by illustrators. 5 hours lab.
ART 423. History of Early Christian and Medieval Art (3)
Prerequisites: Upper division standing, ART 110. A study of the art and architecture of Europe and the Mediterranean from the 3rd century to the end of the 14th century.
ART 424. Drawing IV: Life Drawing (3-3)
Prerequisite: ART 324B. Advanced problems in draftsmanship, and study of the human figure, with special emphasis on freedom of expression and experimentation. (Portfolio review is required to be eligible for enrollment for 3rd and 4th semester repeat credit.) 5 hours per week.
ART 425. History of Italian Renaissance Art (3)
Prerequisite: Upper division standing. Study of the developments in art and architecture of Italy from 1300 to 1520 with particular emphasis on the relationship between the visual tradition and cultural context. Regular written assignments are required.
ART 426. Art and Architecture of Italy and Spain During the Sixteenth Century (3)
Prerequisite: Upper division standing. Comprehensive survey of architecture, painting and sculpture in Italy (High Renaissance and Mannerism) and Spain during the 16th century. Particular emphasis on the relationship between style and cultural context.
ART 427. Painting III (3-3-3-3)
Prerequisites: ART 326; 327. Emphasis on individuality and invention through independent research and experimentation. Guidelines and objectives to be established with individuals. (Portfolio review is required to be eligible for enrollment for 3rd and 4th semester repeat credit.) 5 hours per week.
ART 428. History of Northern Renaissance Art (3)
Prerequisite: Upper division standing. Study of the developments in art and architecture of Northern Europe from the 14th through the 16th centuries. Particular emphasis on the relationship between the visual tradition and cultural context. Regular written assignments required.
ART 429. Advanced Study in Contemporary Painting (3-3-3-3)
Prerequisites: ART 326. Portfolio review required upon entering the course. Projects emphasize conceptual development in painting through visual and material based research, development of advanced critique and presentation skills, and exposure to contemporary painting. Students are encouraged to explore contemporary painting media including installation, 3-D elements, and non-traditional materials and processes, in addition to traditional painting technique. Portfolio development is emphasized. 5 hours per week.
ART 430. Drawing IV: Composition (3-3)
Prerequisite: ART 330. Advanced drawing problems in 2-dimensional composition and pictorial organization. 5 hours per week.
ART 431. History of Baroque Art (3)
Prerequisite: Upper division standing. Preparatory: ART 426. A study of the arts from the Counter Reformation (1563) to the death of Louis XIV (1715). Painting, sculpture, and architecture in Europe with a special emphasis on the arts of Italy, the Netherlands, and France. Regular written assignments required.
ART 432. History of European Art 1720-1850 (3)
Prerequisite: Upper division standing. Development of painting, sculpture, architecture and the decorative arts in Europe from c. 1720 to 1850.
ART 433. History of European Art 1850-1900 (3)
Prerequisite: Upper division standing. Development of painting, sculpture, and architecture in Europe during the second half of the 19th century. Emphasis on major figures of Impressionism, Post-Impressionism, Art Nouveau, and the close relationship between the visual arts, literature, and political history.
ART 435. Sculpture III (3-3-3-3)
Prerequisite: ART 335. Advanced study with special consideration of conception, media, and techniques through emphasis on individual projects. (Portfolio review is required to be eligible for enrollment for third and fourth semester repeat credit) 5 hours lab.
ART 437. Printmaking III (3-3-3-3)
Preparatory: ART 337A. Intensive study of etching, collagraph, silkscreen, lithography or experimental processes and combinations, stressing individual growth and aesthetic control imagery and technique. (Portfolio review required to be eligible for enrollment for 3rd and 4th semester repeat credit) 5 hours lab.
ART 438/L. Senior Projects and Lab (2/1)
Prerequisite: Senior-standing. Corequisite: ART 438L. Projects which afford students the opportunity to assess their training, summarize their achievements, and analyze their place in the visual arts. Some sections of this course may offer a community service opportunity with activities relating to concepts and theories presented. Check the schedule of classes for the CS designation.
ART 439. Bronze Casting Sculpture (3-3)
Prerequisite: ART 235. Lost-wax bronze casting foundry projects. Students create sculpture to be cast in bronze. 5 hours per week.
ART 441. History of American Art (3)
Prerequisite: Upper division standing. Study of the American tradition of art and architecture from 1620 to the early 20th century. (Offered fall semester)
ART 443. Animation Drawing (3-3)
Prerequisite: ART 224A. Exploration of the various forms of drawing related to the field of animation. Direct drawing of the human figure from models; drawing a variety of animals from live observation; and development of layout drawing used for background painting. Emphasis on volume, mass, weight, movement/gesture, conveying attitude, dramatic expression, action poses, acting, anatomy, consistent perspective and economy of line. 5 class hours per week.
ART 444. Graphic Design III (3-3)
Prerequisite: ART 344. Advanced and complex problem-solving consistent with those of graphic designers in the field. Emphasis on project of substantive scope, integration of skills and presentation. Students should have developed a professional resume and portfolio by the end of this series. 5 hours lab.
ART 445. History of Modern Art (3)
Prerequisite: Upper division standing. Investigation of major movements in 20th century painting, sculpture, architecture with reference to the social, economic, and ideological context.
ART 446. Packaging Design (3-3)
Prerequisite: ART 344. Designing for product containers, identification graphics, product line packaging, and related display. Coordination of the fundamental elements of packaging such as typography, color, imagery, and package structure. 5 hours lab.
ART 448. History of Contemporary Art (3)
Prerequisite: ART 110. Deals with American and European art from mid-century to the present. Includes a study of developments in non-traditional media, crafts and popular arts as well as painting and sculpture. Regular written assignments required.
ART 450. Photography III (3-3-3-3)
Preparatory: Art 350AB. Advanced problems in photography. Emphasis on content; the student is encouraged to apply technical and expressive skills in photography toward some original and meaningful use of the medium. Students required to present an original project to the class for discussion and is then required to execute it. May be repeated 3 times for credit. Portfolio review required for eligibility for enrollment for third and fourth semester repeat credit. 5 hours lab.
ART 455A. Advertising Photography I (3)
Preparatory: ART 250. Professional problems, techniques and equipment of advertising photography. Activities include: the use of large format camera, equipment, professional lighting, environmental and studio product photography, professional printing, and print finishing techniques. 5 hours lab.
ART 455B. Advertising Photography II (3)
Prerequisite: ART 455A. Advanced projects in advertising photography. Emphasis on problems of large product and exterior photography, portrait and figure studies and uses of complex lighting. 5 hours lab.
ART 455C. Advanced Advertising Photography (3-3)
Preparatory: Art 455B. Investigation of advanced advertising problems in photography exploring both the technical and conceptual challenges of visual communication. Advanced projects in portraiture, fashion, table-top, photo-illustration, editorial will be addressed. Computer imaging introduced as an important area of investigation. May be repeated once for credit. 5 hours lab.
ART 458. Graphics Seminar (2)
Prerequisites: Senior-standing ART 344; six additional units of upper division advertising graphics. Review of career options that relate to advertising graphics. Study of particular problems faced by the graduate in selecting, planning and becoming established in a profession. Discussions and assignments are designed to aid the student in meeting professional requirements. Some sections of this course may offer a community service opportunity with activities relating to concepts and theories presented. Check the schedule of classes for the CS designation.
ART 461. History of Graphic Arts (3)
History of the development of the original print as a work of art from the 15th century to the present, including relief, intaglio, and planographic media. (Offered spring semester)
ART 462. History of Photography (3)
Emphasizes the aesthetics of photography and its emergence and acceptance as a fine art. In addition to slide lectures and discussions, students are required to attend several photography exhibitions and lectures at galleries and museums in the area.
ART 463. Animation III (3-3)
Prerequisite: ART 363B. Advanced level development and production of an original animation project. Students may utilize 3-D computer animation or 2-D methods. May be repeated once for credit. 5 hours lab.
ART 467. Ceramics IV (3-3-3-3)
Prerequisite: ART 367. Advanced investigation of the use of clay as it relates to a personal direction. Advanced refinement of ideas, technical processes and approaches as they relate to a unified body of work and to contemporary visual art. Continued experimentation with technical processes, clay bodies, glaze formulation and surface treatments. Development of portfolio materials and documentation of the unified body of work. (Portfolio review is required to be eligible for enrollment for 3rd and 4th semester repeat credit). Course fee. 5 hours lab.
ART 468. History of Women in the Visual Arts (3)
Prerequisite: upper division standing. Preparatory: WS 200. Covers the history of women as artists in the European and American traditions. Art by women in non-Western cultures is also studied, together with related issues such as images of women and feminist art analysis.
ART 470. Design On Fabric III (3-3)
Prerequisite: ART 372. Advanced problems in design on fabric. Emphasis on creative design and execution of hand printed and dyed fabrics. 5 hours lab.
ART 472. Studio Problems in Fabric As Art (3-3-3-3)
Prerequisites: ART 470 or 474 or 475. Advanced projects in design and structure of fabric with emphasis on concept and individual expression. Two and 3-dimensional forms and advanced pattern development are explored. (Portfolio review is required to be eligible for enrollment for 3rd and 4th semester repeat credit.) 5 hours lab.
ART 474. Decorative Design/textiles and Related Surfaces (3)
Prerequisites: upper division standing and portfolio. Development of original designs suitable for mass-produced textiles and related surfaces such as paper goods, china, and stationery using various color media on paper. Limitations relating to function, style, production, and other technical considerations will be explored. 5 hours lab.
ART 475. Fiber Art II (3-3)
Prerequisite: ART 372. Advanced problems in fiber structure methods and processes both loom and non woven. Emphasis on design. 5 hours lab.
ART 477. Design in Wood III (3-3-3-3)
Prerequisite: ART 377. Advanced studio problems in wood design and fabrication. Particular emphasis upon the maturity and depth of design solutions. (Portfolio review is required to be eligible for enrollment for 3rd and 4th semester repeat credit) 5 hours lab.
ART 479/L. Art Education Across and Lab (2/1)
Prerequisite: Junior-standing. Corequisite: 479L. Provides knowledge and practice in planning and relating art experiences and increases teacher effectiveness in cross-cultural teaching of the arts. Meets requirement for multicultural education for Multiple and Single Subject Credentials; Category B for the Clear Credential. Two hours discussion; two hours studio.
ART 480/L. Art Experiences for Exceptional Children and Lab (2/1)
Corequisite: ART 480L. Significance of art for exceptional children including the deaf, blind, emotionally disturbed, learning handicapped, hospitalized children and the gifted. Meets the Special Education requirement for a Clear Credential for Single Subject Credential; Art only. Some sections of this course may offer a community service opportunity with activities relating to concepts and theories presented. Check the schedule of classes for the CS designation. Two hours discussion, two hours studio.
ART 481. Art as Therapy (3)
Prerequisite: Senior-standing. Study of main theoretical trends in Art Therapy, practice and historical development. Studio experiences with appropriate art materials. Some sections of this course may offer a community service opportunity with activities relating to concepts and theories presented. Check the schedule of classes for the CS designation. (Offered fall semester) two hours discussion, two hours studio.
ART 485/L. Studio Problems in Teaching Crafts and Lab (1/2)
Prerequisite: Junior-standing. Corequisite: 485L. Required for a Single Subject Credential in Art. Emphasis on the development of basic skills in a variety of crafts, such as: weaving, textiles, ceramics, wood, and paper. Introduction to principles of design and craftsmanship. Discussions of aesthetics, criticism, and cultural heritage related to the crafts accompany the studio component. Develops strategies for integrating these skills and understandings into a variety of education and recreational settings. One hour discussion; 4 hours of studio.
ART 486/L. Studio Problems in Teaching Art Lab (2/1)
Prerequisite: Junior-standing. Corequisite: ART 486L. Required for a Single Subject Credential in Art. Skills and understandings related to organizing and developing strategies for teaching art in a variety of educational settings. Emphasis upon 2-dimensional media such as drawing, watercolor painting, poster painting and printmaking. (Offered spring semester) two hours discussion; two hours studio.
ART 487. Puppetry (3)
Prerequisite: Junior-standing. Examines the art of the puppet in its various forms: rod, string, hand, and shadow. Application to schools, libraries, hospital, recreation, special education and other settings. Two hours discussion, two hours studio.
ART 488CS. Public Art (3-3)
Development and completion of art forms in the public realm. Public art investigated in a workshop format that includes speakers, demonstrations, field trips, and art products. Emphasis on studio skills, proposal development, and service learning activities. Some sections of this course may offer a community service opportunity with activities relating to concepts and theories presented. Check the schedule of classes for the CS designation. 5 hours per week.
ART 494. Internship in Arts (3-3)
Prerequisites: Senior or graduate-standing; portfolio review. Available for Art Major credit. Academic Internship course. Experiential education in appropriate aspects of specific area of interest. Six units maximum. (Credit/No Credit Only)
ART 495A-Z. Extended Study (3-3)
PrerequisiteS: Senior-standing; prerequisite course in selected study area (listed below); consent of instructor, art advisor and Department Chair. Portfolio required by course instructor. Continued study in designated studio areas. Students attend the scheduled class of the prerequisite course. Only one Extended Study is permitted in each study area. Maximum of six units may be applied toward a degree requirement.
Activity courses: 6 hours per week
(A) Anatomy (Prerequisite ART 224A), (B) Portraiture (Prerequisite ART 224B), (C) Design Visualization (Prerequisite ART 325), (D) Watercolor (Prerequisite ART 328), (E) Design Projections (Prerequisite ART 333), (F) Exhibition Design (Prerequisite ART 342), (G) Process and Materials (Prerequisite ART 349), (I) Animation Drawing (Prerequisite ART 443). Lab courses: 9 hours per week; (N) Large Format Photography (Prerequisite ART 355), (P) Animation III (Prerequisite ART 463)
ART 496A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses in Art (1-3)
Experimental courses in Art with course content to be determined.
ART 499. Independent Study (1-6)
Enrollment in Independent Study is by department chair’s consent and instructor’s consent to act as sponsor. Admission based on evidence of ability to pursue in-depth Independent Study and approval of a project submitted at the time of registration. Regular progress meetings and reports are required throughout the semester. Completion of the project is required before credit may be received. No more than six units of credit in 499 may be earned toward the Bachelor’s Degree in Art. Enrollment in Independent Study is not allowed for the purpose of substitution for an existing course.

Graduate

Note that 300-level courses in Art do not carry credit for a Master’s in Art; 400-level courses in Art carry credit for a Master’s in Art only if they are approved by the department and graduate advisor. Qualified undergraduate seniors may take 500-level courses with consent of the instructor. Previous successful completion of units in the same studio specialization are required prior to graduate level studio course enrollment.

ART 500. History of Art Museums and Collecting in Western Civilization (3)
Prerequisite: ART 110; 111; two 400-level courses in art history. Study of how the museum concept has developed through the centuries. Survey of the world’s most important public museums and their content. Importance of art collecting since the 19th century and problems in museology.
ART 502. Gallery and Museum Practices (3)
Introduction to problems in gallery and museum organization, management, and administration, including preparatorial and curatorial functions.
ART 520. Studio Problems Video/ Digital Art (3-3-3-3)
Investigation into artistic studio problems in video/digital art. Explorations lead to resolution of personal artistic statements. Increasing complexity in concept, media, and presentation is required in the sequence of course work. Available for repeat credit. Six hours per week in supervised studio work.
ART 521. Studio Problems: Painting (3-3-3-3)
Prerequisites: Graduate-standing; instructor consent. Investigation of artistic problems in painting, exploration leading to resolution in artistic statements. Problems of increasing complexity and evidence of greater depth of artistic concept required in the sequence of course work. One hour per week in seminar; 5 hours per week in supervised studio work.
ART 522. Studio Problems: Illustration (3-3-3-3)
Prerequisites: Graduate-standing; instructor consent. Investigation of artistic problems in illustration with exploration leading to concrete resolutions. Problems of increased complexity and greater depth of practical problem solving required in the sequence of course work. 5 hours lab.
ART 524. Studio Problems: Drawing (3-3-3-3)
Prerequisite: ART 424. Investigation of advanced problems in drawing or in drawing and related art disciplines. Projects of increasing complexity which require evidence of greater depth and skill in the resolution of visual statements. One hour per week in seminar; 5 hours per week in supervised studio work.
ART 525. Studio Problems: Printmaking (3-3-3-3)
Prerequisite: Graduate standing; instructor consent. Investigation of artistic problems in printmaking, exploration leading to resolution in artistic statements. Problems of increasing complexity and evidence of greater depth of artistic concept required in the sequence of course work. One hour per week in seminar; 5 hours per week in supervised studio work.
ART 535. Studio Problems: Sculpture (3-3-3-3)
Prerequisite: Graduate-standing; instructor consent. Investigation of advanced problems in sculpture.
ART 539. Advanced Figure Study (3-3-3-3)
Prerequisite: ART 339. Advanced sculptural problems dealing with the human figure. Large scale sculpture from the model emphasizing expressive content. 5 hours lab.
ART 542CS. Advanced Exhibition Design (3)
Prerequisite: Graduate-standing. Advanced study of the primary components of exhibition design including curating, budgeting, installation and promotion. Focuses on public relations, education, community service, tours, publicity and publication as they pertain to the CSUN and or community galleries and their functions. Several class meetings held in each of the Art Galleries, as well as other venues. Offers a community service opportunity with activities relating to concepts and theories presented. 5 hours per week.
ART 544. Studio Problems: Graphic Design (3-3-3-3)
Prerequisites: ART 444 or equivalent; graduate-standing; instructor consent. Investigation of advanced problems in graphic design exploring both the technical and conceptual challenges of visual communication. Projects of increasing complexity and evidence of greater depth of artistic concept required in the sequence of course work. 5 hours lab.
ART 550. Studio Problems: Photography (3-3-3-3)
Prerequisites: Portfolio review; graduate-standing; instructor consent. Investigation of advanced problems in photography exploring both the technical and conceptual challenges of visual communication. Projects of increasing complexity and evidence of greater depth of artistic concept required in the sequence of course work. 5 hours lab.
ART 560. Studio Problems in Ceramics Design (3-3-3-3)
Prerequisite: Graduate-standing; instructor consent. Investigation of artistic problems in ceramics and/or glass design, exploration and experimentation leading to resolution in artistic statements. Problems in increasing complexity and evidence of greater depth of artistic concept required in the sequence of course work. One hour per week in seminar; 5 hours per week in supervised studio work.
ART 565. Studio Problems in Wood (3-3)
Prerequisite: Graduate-standing; instructor consent. Investigation of artistic problems in wood exploration and experimentation leading to resolution in artistic statements. Problems in increasing complexity and evidence of greater depth of artistic concept required in the sequence or course work. One hour per week in seminar; 5 hours per week in supervised studio work.
ART 570. Studio Problems in Fiber and Fabrics (3-3)
Prerequisite: Graduate-standing; instructor consent. Investigation of artistic problems in fiber and fabrics, exploration and experimentation leading to resolution in artistic statements. Problems in increasing complexity and evidence of greater depth of artistic concept required in the sequence of course work. One hour per week in seminar; 5 hours per week in supervised studio work.
ART 588. Studio Problems in Public Art (3-3-3-3)
Prerequisite: 400-level Art course; 488; instructor consent. Development and completion of art forms planned for placement in the public realm. Increasing complexity and evidence of greater depth required in the sequence of course work. Public art investigated in a workshop format that includes speakers, demonstrations and field trips. Emphasis on studio activities, proposal development, and service learning. Some sections of this course may offer a community service opportunity with activities relating to concepts and theories presented in the course. Check the schedule of classes for the CS designation. 5 hours per week.
ART 590. History and Philosophy of Art (3)
Prerequisite: Junior-standing. Required for Single Subject Credential in Art. May be used as upper division art elective for B.A. degree. Intensive study of the historical and chronological development of Art Education in America and abroad. Emphasis on significant trends and movements which have affected its growth and present structure.
ART 611. History and Philosophy of Art (3)
Prerequisite: Minimum 1 year history of art (2 years recommended); graduate-standing. Seminar examining the development of movements and ideas in 20th century art. Research in modern art and artists. (Offered fall semester)
ART 615. Art Analysis and Criticism (3)
Prerequisites: Minimum 1 year history of art; graduate-standing. Seminar exploring the critical approach to the work of art in terms of form, content, and expression. Aesthetic and methodological problems will be treated in particular relationship to contemporary art and its criticism. (Offered spring semester)
ART 619. Seminar in Art History (3-3-3)
Prerequisites: Classified graduate-standing; ART 311 or equivalent; instructor consent. Restricted to graduate students in Art History. Research in depth on specific problems of art history. May be repeated twice for credit.
ART 620. Advanced Studio Problems: Video/ Digital Art (3-3-3-3)
Prerequisite: ART 502 or equivalent. Investigation into advanced concepts involved in the production of video/digital art forms. Explores resolution of problems dealing with media, technique and presentation. Increasing complexity and evidence of conceptual depth is required in the sequence of coursework. 5 hours per week in supervised studio work.
ART 621. Advanced Studio Problems: Painting (3-3-3-3)
Prerequisites: Classified graduate standing; instructor consent. Investigation of artistic problems in painting, exploration leading to resolution in artistic statements. Problems of increasing complexity and evidence of greater depth of artistic concept required in the sequence of coursework. May be repeated 3 times for credit. One hour per week in seminar; 5 hours per week in supervised studio work.
ART 622. Advanced Studio Problems: Illustration (3-3-3-3)
Prerequisites: Classified graduate-level standing and instructor consent. Investigation of advanced problems in illustration, exploration leading to resolution in artistic statements. Problems of increasing complexity and evidence of greater depth of artistic concept required in the sequence of course work. One hour per week in seminar; 5 hours per week in supervised studio work.
ART 624. Advanced Studio Problems: Drawing (3-3-3-3)
Prerequisites: Classified graduate-standing; instructor consent. Investigation of advanced problems in drawing and related art disciplines. Projects of increasing complexity which require evidence of greater depth and skill in the resolution of visual statements. One hour per week in seminar; 5 hours per week in supervised studio work.
ART 625. Advanced Studio Problems: Printmaking (3-3-3-3)
Prerequisites: Classified graduate-standing and instructor consent. Investigation of artistic problems in printmaking, exploration leading to resolution in artistic statements. Problems of increasing complexity and evidence of greater depth of artistic concept required in the sequence of course work. One hour per week in seminar; 5 hours per week in supervised studio work.
ART 635. Advanced Studio Problems: Sculpture (3-3-3-3)
Prerequisite: Classified graduate-standing; instructor consent. Investigation of advanced problems in sculpture.
ART 644. Advanced Studio Problems: Graphic Design (3-3-3-3)
Prerequisite: Classified graduate-level standing; instructor consent. Investigation of advanced problems in graphic design, exploration leading to resolution in artistic statements. Problems of increasing complexity and evidence of greater depth of artistic concept required in the sequence of course work. One hour per week in seminar; 5 hours per week in supervised studio work.
ART 650. Advanced Studio Problems: Photography (3-3-3-3)
Prerequisites: Classified graduate-standing; six units Art 550; portfolio review. Investigation of advanced problems in photography exploring both the technical and conceptual challenges of visual communication. Projects of increasing complexity with evidence of greater depth of artistic concept and proficiency required in the sequence of course work. 5 hours lab.
ART 665. Advanced Studio Problems in Wood (3-3-3-3)
Prerequisite: Classified graduate-standing; instructor consent. Investigation of artistic problems in wood exploration and experimentation leading to resolution in artistic statements. Problems in increasing complexity and evidence of greater depth of artistic concept required in the sequence or course work. One hour per week in seminar; 5 hours per week in supervised studio work.
ART 660. Advanced Studio Problems in Ceramics Design (3-3-3-3)
Prerequisite: Classified graduate-standing; instructor consent. Investigation of artistic problems in ceramics, exploration and experimentation leading to resolution in artistic statements. Problems in increasing complexity and evidence of greater depth of artistic concept required in the sequence of course work. One hour per week in seminar; 5 hours per week in supervised studio work.
ART 670. Advanced Studio Problems in Fiber and Fabrics (3-3-3-3)
Prerequisite: Classified graduate-standing; instructor consent. Investigation of artistic problems in fiber and fabrics, exploration and experimentation leading to resolution in artistic statements. Problems in increasing complexity and evidence of greater depth of artistic concept required in the sequence of course work. One hour per week in seminar; 5 hours per week in supervised studio work.
ART 681A. Seminar in Art Education (3)
Prerequisite: Classified graduate-standing. Graduate students from outside the department of Art permitted with consent of instructor. Study of the nature of creativity in art, place of art in the curriculum, improving teaching methods and inquiry into other disciplines for related implications. Identification of areas of greatest need for research.
ART 681B. Seminar in Art Education (3)
Prerequisite: Classified graduate-standing. Recommended Corequisite or Preparatory: ART 681A. Investigation and identification of areas in greatest need of research in art education. Special emphasis on selection of projects most appropriate for development and for advanced research.
ART 686. Research in Art Education (3-3)
Prerequisite: Graduate-standing; restricted to M.A. Art candidates. Recommended Corequisite: ART 681B. Current experiments and studies in art education; problems of conducting research unique to the area of investigation. Development of research studies with emphasis on design, criteria, measurement, and standards of proof.
ART 688. Advanced Studio Problems: Public Art (3-3-3-3)
Prerequisites: Classified graduate-standing; ART 588; instructor consent. Participation and leadership required in the development and completion of public art projects that are planned for the public realm. Increasing complexity and evidence of greater depth required in the sequence of course work. Public art investigated in a workshop format that includes speakers, demonstrations and field trips. Emphasis on studio activities, proposal development, and service learning activities. Some sections of this course may offer a community service opportunity with activities relating to concepts and theories presented in the course. Check the schedule of classes for the CS designation. Six hours per week.
ART 696A-C. Directed Graduate Research (1-3)
Prerequisite: Classified status; advisor consent.
ART 698C M.A. Thesis/Artistic Performance (3)
Prerequisites: Classified graduate-standing; completion of or current enrollment in all required Area of Concentration courses for the M.A. degree in Art; consent of graduate advisor and thesis committee; conformance to university standards for graduate thesis. Provides the M.A. degree candidate with a culminating experience, approved and supervised by the student’s Thesis Committee, to be undertaken only with the student’s Thesis Committee’s consent after all other requirements have been met. Encompasses the preparation, completion, and formal presentation of the culminating work for the degree. Within the M.A. in Art program, there are 4 areas of study: Art Education, Art History, Studio Arts. Each of these areas of study follows its own specific department-approved procedures. The final form of the thesis must adhere to University regulations for thesis presentation and be approved by the Office of Graduate Research and International Programs.
ART 698F. M.A. Thesis/Artistic Performance (6)
Prerequisites: Classified graduate-standing; completion of or current enrollment in all required courses.
ART 699A-C. Independent Study (1-3)
Enrollment limited to qualified classified graduate students with the consent of the department, graduate advisor and the departmental graduate committee. Intensive independent investigation into that area of the fine arts in which the graduate student is specializing.

Master of Fine Arts

ART 690A-Z. M.F.A. Studio (3-3-3-3)
Prerequisites: M.F.A.; Classified status; instructor’s and graduate advisor’s consent. Investigation of advanced artistic problems leading to a highly specialized and personal aesthetic. 5 hours per week.
ART 691A-Z. M.F.A. Seminar (3-3-3-3)
Prerequisite: M.F.A.; Classified status. Orientation to the procedures and requirements of the MFA professional degree programs in Studio or Visual communication Arts. Exploration into career development, professional issues, and writing about art. Philosophies pertaining to disciplines in the visual arts are examined through a series of guest lectures. Three hours per week.
ART 698MFA. MFA Thesis/ Artistic Performance (3)
Prerequisites: M.F.A.; Classified status; completion of or current enrollment in all required Area of Concentration courses for the M.F.A. degree; consent of Graduate Advisor and Thesis Committee; conformance to University standards for graduate thesis. Provides the M.F.A. candidate with a culminating experience, approved and supervised by the degree committee, which presents the artistic endeavors pursued during the graduate program. Consists of an exhibition and/or performance of the student’s work, photographic documentation and a written statement addressing the aesthetic, philosophical and, when appropriate, technical aspects of the work. The final form of the thesis must adhere to University regulations for thesis presentation and be approved by the Office of Graduate Research and International Programs.