Table of Contents

Appendices

Appendix A. Enrollment Regulations

  1. A-1. Intrasystem and Intersystem Enrollment Programs
  2. A-2. Open University: Summer, Fall and Spring
  3. A-3. Academic Leave (Leave of Absence)
  4. A-4. Transcripts of CSUN Courses
  5. A-5. Grade Reporting
  6. A-6. Catalog Requirements (Catalog Rights)
  7. A-7. Student Responsibility for Catalog Information
  8. A-8. Credit by Challenge Examination Taken at CSUN
  9. A-9. Standardized Breaks In Classes
  10. A-10. Full-Time Enrollment
  11. A-11. Campus Service I.D. Card
  12. A-12. Academic Load Regulations
  13. A-13. Academic Internship Policy

Appendix B. Fees

  1. B-1. Fees
  2. B-2. Schedule of Fees
  3. B-3. Policy on Prosecution for Theft and Bad Checks
  4. B-4. Refund of Fees Including Nonresident Tuition
  5. B-5. Fees and Debts Owed to the Institution
  6. B-6. Fee Waivers
  7. B-7. Procedure for the Establishment or Abolishment of a Student Body Fee

Appendix C. Privacy and Student Information

  1. C-1. Privacy Rights of Students in Education Records
  2. C-2. Use of Social Security Number
  3. C-3. Career Placement

Appendix D. Nondiscrimination Policy

  1. D-1. Nondiscrimination Policies
  2. D-2. Race, Color, Ethnicity, National Origin, Age and Religion
  3. D-3. Disability
  4. D-4. Sex/Gender
  5. D-5. Policy on Sexual Assault and Acquaintance Rape
  6. D-6. Accommodation of Religious Creed
  7. D-7. Policy on Sexual Harassment
  8. D-8. Complaint Procedures (Discrimination and Harassment)
  9. D-9. Other Discrimination and Harassment Complaints/Grievance Procedures

Appendix E. Student Conduct

  1. E-1. Student Conduct Code
  2. E-2. Academic Dishonesty
  3. E-3. Faculty Policy on Academic Dishonesty
  4. E-4. Penalties for Academic Dishonesty
  5. E-5. Grade Correction Procedure
  6. E-6. Retention of Student Work Policy
  7. E-7 Academic Grievances and Grade Appeals
  8. E-8. University Policy on Alcohol and Other Drugs
  9. E-9. University Policy on Smoking
  10. E-10. Violence in the Workplace

Appendix F. Admission Procedures and Policies

  1. F-1. Importance of Filing Complete, Accurate and Authentic Application Documents
  2. F-2. Undergraduate Application Procedures
  3. F-3. Foreign Language Subject Requirement
  4. F-4. Subject Requirement Substitution for Students with Disabilities
  5. F-5. Other Undergraduate Applicants
  6. F-6. Graduate and Post-Baccalaureate Admission Requirements
  7. F-7. Admission to Graduate Study with CSUN Bachelor’s Degree
  8. F-8. Impacted ProgramsM
  9. F-9. Hardship Petitions
  10. F-10. Determination of Residence for Nonresident Tuition Purposes
  11. F-11. Average Support Cost Per Full-time Equivalent Student and Sources of Funds
  12. F-12. International (Foreign) Student Admission Requirements Undergraduate/Graduate
  13. F-13. Immigration Requirements for Licensure
  14. F-14. Reservation
  15. F-15. Systemwide Placement Test Requirements: ELM and EPT
  16. F-16. Upper-Division Writing Proficiency Exam (UDWPE)
  17. F-17. Mathematics Placement Test (MPT)
  18. F-18. Chemistry Placement Test (CPT)
  19. F-19. Health Screening
  20. F-20. Degree Progress Report (DPR)
  21. F-21. Credit for Work Taken at Community Colleges
  22. F-22. Credit/No Credit Work
  23. F-23. CSU English Equivalency Examination
  24. F-24. Restrictions on Exam Credit
  25. F-25. Other Credit
  26. F-26. Availability of Institutional and Financial Assistance Information

Appendix G. University Regulations

  1. G-1. Appeal of Undergraduate University Regulations
  2. G-2. Changes in Rules and Policies
  3. G-3. Catalog Production

Appendix H. Other Policies

  1. H-1. Second Bachelor’s Degree
  2. H-2. International Baccalaureate (IB)
  3. H-3. Academic Renewal
  4. H-4. Student Outcomes Assessment Policy
  5. H-5. Class Levels (Class Standing)
  6. H-6. Advanced Placement Credits
  7. H-7. College Level Examination Program (CLEP)
  8. H-8. International Baccalaureate (IB) Exam Credit
  9. H-9. Undergraduate Enrollment in Graduate Level Courses

Appendix A. Enrollment Regulations

A-1. Intrasystem and Intersystem Enrollment Programs

Students enrolled at any CSU campus will have access to courses at other CSU campuses on a space available basis unless those campuses or programs are impacted. This access is offered without students being required to be admitted formally to the host campus and sometimes without paying additional fees. Although courses taken on any CSU campus will transfer to the student’s home CSU campus as elective credit, students should consult their home campus academic advisors to determine how such courses may apply to their degree programs before enrolling at the host campus.

There are two programs for enrollment within the CSU and one for enrollment between CSU and the University of California or California Community Colleges. Additional information about these programs is available from Admissions and Records: (818) 677-3700.

CSU Concurrent Enrollment – matriculated students in good standing may enroll at both their home CSU campus and a host CSU campus during the same term. Credit earned at the host campus is reported at the student’s request to the home campus to be included in the transfer credits on the student’s transcript at the home campus.

CSU Visitor Enrollment – matriculated students in good standing enrolled at one CSU campus may enroll at another CSU campus for one term. Credit earned at the host campus is reported at the student’s request to the home campus to be included in the transfer credits on the student’s transcript at the home campus.

Intersystem Cross Enrollment – matriculated CSU, UC, or community college students may enroll on a “space available” basis for one course per term at another CSU, UC, or community college and request that a transcript of record be sent to the home campus.

A-2. Open University at CSUN – Through The Tseng College – Fall, Spring and “Summer for Visiting Students” Terms

Open University is a registration status that allows nonmatriculated students (i.e., those who have not been admitted to a state- or self-supported CSUN degree program) to enroll in undergraduate and graduate courses on the CSUN campus on a space-available basis with the permission of the instructor. Open University registration is through CSUN’s Tseng College. The following Open University policies and procedures apply for Open University in the Fall, Spring and “Summer for Visiting Students” terms:

  1. Each academic department shall decide whether to participate in Open University enrollment and which courses are appropriate for Open University enrollment. This is done via a notation in Solar (the University’s database management system) as the course is set up and scheduled for the term.
  2. Even when a department has approved a course for Open University enrollment in a given term, an individual instructor retains the right to decline an Open University enrollment request. Instructors indicate their acceptance of Open University students by giving each student a permission number that will enable the student to register online or in person with The Tseng College registration office.
  3. Open University enrollment normally will not be accepted in a class that has reached the maximum enrollment.
  4. Students seeking Open University enrollment in classes with prerequisites are responsible for furnishing the instructors with evidence of having met the academic requirements for the course. The instructor shall determine whether a student is academically qualified before issuing a permission number.
  5. Prospective Open University students need to obtain permission to attend the course of their choice from the instructor. This is done by attending the first class meeting and requesting a permission number, which can then be used to enroll online.
  6. In general, Open University students will not constitute more than 50 percent of the scheduled maximum enrollment for the course.
  7. Open University students admitted in CSUN courses receive the same academic credit as other students in the course. The grade earned for the course becomes part of the Open University student’s long-term academic record at CSUN and appears on the regular University transcript.
  8. Nonmatriculated students may take any number of courses over time through Open University. However, if a nonmatriculated student is admitted to a CSUN state-funded or self-support degree program(i.e., becomes a matriculated student), a maximum of only 24 credit units taken before matriculation can be applied to an undergraduate degree and a maximum of nine credit units taken before matriculation can be applied to a graduate degree, graduate credit certificate program or credential program.
  9. Determination of which courses, if any, of those taken before matriculation are applicable to the degree program up to the maximums stated above rests with the department responsible for the program. Some degree programs with highly integrated curricula may not accept any credits from courses taken prior to admission because the program stands as an educational whole.
  10. Enrollment in CSUN courses through Open University does not constitute admission to the University nor does it entitle Open University students to student services available to matriculated students (i.e., students enrolled in degree, credit certificate program or credential program). Open University students do, however, have library privileges. For more information about Open University, including fee information, Visit the Tseng College Website or call (818) 677-2504.

Winter Term Registration Options For Matriculated and Nonmatriculated Students

CSUN generally offers a three-to-four week Winter Term (Intersession) program in January. Courses offered are taught in intensive formats with many holding daily class meetings. Winter Term courses are open to both matriculated students in self- and state-supported degree programs and nonmatriculated students (those not admitted to a CSUN degree program). Winter Term registration is through CSUN’s Tseng College. Students may enroll in no more than one course in Winter Term unless they receive permission to enroll in an additional course from The Tseng College’s director of client services at (818) 677-2504. For more information, including fee information, Visit the Tseng College Website.

A-3. Academic Leave (Leave of Absence)

To encourage continuing students with satisfactory scholastic performance to return to CSUN following an absence, the University will automatically place qualified resident and nonresident students on a Leave of Absence if they:

  1. were matriculated students in the semester immediately prior to the beginning of the leave;
  2. were not disqualified at the close of the semester;
  3. did not receive an undergraduate degree at the end of the preceding regular or summer term at CSUN.

Eligible students who fail to enroll in the first three weeks or who withdraw during the first two weeks are placed on leave for that semester. If they fail to register in the following semester, they are granted an additional semester of leave. Foreign students with J or F visas, while eligible for leave, require the approval of the International Student Advisor.

Classified graduate students in degree programs should contact their departments before the end of their last semester of attendance.

Continuing students who do not enroll after the two semesters of leave, must reapply for admission.

A-4. Transcripts of CSUN Courses

Official transcripts of courses taken at CSUN are issued only with the written request of the student concerned. Transcripts of work taken at other institutions will not be issued. The University reserves the right to withhold issuing the transcript of any student not in good financial standing with the University.

A-5. Grade Reporting

Grades are available through the myNorthridge Student Center (SOLAR) approximately one week after the final exam period. Any discrepancies should be reported to Admissions and Records so that they may be promptly investigated. The grade report reflects cumulative units earned, including units that may not be applicable to degree requirements. Cumulative baccalaureate level degree units earned are provided on the DPR and when a graduation evaluation is completed. In some cases it may be necessary to contact individual instructors to resolve grade reporting errors. With the exception of a removal of an Incomplete within the prescribed period, no changes to the student record will be made after a degree has been awarded.

A-6. Catalog Requirements (Catalog Rights)

An undergraduate student remaining in attendance in regular sessions at any California community college, at any CSU campus, or any combination of California community colleges and campuses of the CSU, may meet the requirements in effect at the campus from which the student will graduate either (1) at the time the student began such attendance, or (2) at the time of entrance to the campus, or (3) at the time of graduation except that substitutions for discontinued courses may be authorized or required by the proper CSUN authorities. This applies only to graduation requirements and not to procedures or other regulations. Students changing their major or any minor field of study, and students changing from undeclared or undecided majors to declared majors should be aware that they may be required to complete the major or minor requirements in effect at the time of change, at the discretion of the Departments or Programs. They will be allowed, however, to continue with previously established non-major requirements, such as the General Education requirements. Attendance is defined, for purposes of this regulation, as at least one semester or two quarters in each calendar year. Attendance shall not be considered interrupted by absence, not to exceed two years, related to an approved educational leave or for attendance at any accredited institution of higher learning.

A-7. Student Responsibility for Catalog Information

The Catalog represents the intention of the University at the time of its publication to present certain academic programs and requirements to its students. With the passing of time modifications may be made—the addition of some offerings and the deletion of others—in which case some opportunities for students may be eliminated or other opportunities may be presented. The University reserves the right to make such additions, deletions and modifications as circumstances may dictate. Some sections of the current Catalog such as Registration and Student Conduct Code pertain to all students, irrespective of when they entered the University. Some sections pertain only to certain categories of students such as Credit/No Credit grading (for undergraduate rather than graduate students) and Good Standing (with different averages applying for undergraduate and graduate students). In cases of doubt, it is the student’s responsibility to obtain clarification from the appropriate department head or dean whether or not a particular regulation or requirement applies.

A-8. Credit by Challenge Examination Taken at CSUN

Students may challenge courses by taking examinations developed at CSUN. Credit shall be awarded to those who pass them successfully.

Currently enrolled undergraduate students not on probation who are especially qualified through experience or private instruction may petition to earn credit by challenge examination in selected courses designated by each department. A challenge examination provides for the awarding of academic credit through successful completion of an examination of a specific catalog-listed course. Selected laboratory and activity courses in which student participation is an integral part of the learning experience shall not be subject to challenge. Each department shall have the sole responsibility for designating which courses may be challenged by examination.

Challenge examinations are given under the following guidelines:

  1. A student may not petition for Challenge Examination in a course if he or she does not have the prerequisites.
  2. A student may not petition for more than one course in one department during a given semester.
  3. An approval of an application for Challenge Examination shall expire if the examination has not been completed by the end of the semester.
  4. Students may attempt the Challenge Examination in a given course only once.
  5. Approval for Challenge Examination will not be given for a course if the student has already received credit for a similar but more advanced course.
  6. Challenge Examinations may not be used to meet any provisions of the Repeat Course Policy.
  7. A student electing the Credit/No Credit grading option on enrollment for Challenge Examination will be assigned a Credit grade for work equivalent to A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C; “No Credit” will be assigned for work equivalent to C-, D+, D, D-, F. CR/NC grades are not included in the calculation of the grade point average.
  8. The determination of eligibility for Challenge Examination rests ultimately with the department involved, including exceptions to the guidelines.

Procedures: Upon receipt of the Registration packet, a student wishing to challenge a course by examination should consult with the chair of the department offering the course. If the chair approves the request, the ticket number will be assigned, and the letters “XM” or “X” will be added to the course number. The student can then register for the challenge exam course during System Registration. During the add/drop period the student should use a Change of Program form. The words “Challenge Exam” should be printed across the top of the form, and the form should not be used for any other schedule changes. The form must be filed at the Office of Admissions and Records and all required fees paid before the end of the third week of instruction.

A-9. Standardized Breaks In Classes

Continuous lecture classes that last two or more hours should incorporate a break at a predetermined time based on any number of criteria, such as content of the lecture, length of the class, and physical demand placed upon support service personnel for deaf and disabled students. Laboratory classes or classes in which the student traditionally works independently may or may not require a break, depending on the judgment of the faculty. Depending on the uniqueness of each class and the demands placed upon students (and support personnel), professors determine scheduled breaks by utilizing their own solution or one of the following options:

  1. Courses meeting two hours: one break of ten minutes between the first and second hours.
  2. Courses meeting two and one-half hours: one break of fifteen minutes during the middle of the class or two breaks of ten minutes.
  3. Courses meeting three hours: one break of fifteen minutes during the middle of the class or two breaks of ten minutes.
  4. Courses in excess of three hours: one break of ten minutes for each hour of class time or 15 minutes for each one and one-half hour.

A-10. Full-Time Enrollment (Undergraduate and Graduate)

Full-time enrollment for undergraduate students is considered to be 15 units (12 units for financial aid and certain external legal requirements). Graduate students who need to be considered full-time must be enrolled in a minimum of 8 units. Students are responsible for ensuring that their own academic programs are accurate. Any enrollment discrepancies should be brought, in person, to the Office of Admissions and Records for correction. Students are urged to act immediately to correct any enrollment discrepancies in person at the Office of Admissions and Records. Failure to correct an academic program discrepancy or to drop a class officially may result in a grade of WU (Withdrawal Unauthorized) in courses never attended.

A-11. Campus Service I.D. Card

All new CSUN students must purchase a Campus Service I.D. card. This card is required to obtain campus services from the library, the Student Health Center, the University Student Union, and many other campus units. Moreover, it is required to vote in Associated Student elections, to obtain tickets from the Associated Student Ticket Office at reduced rates and to attend CSUN athletic events free of charge.

A-12. Registration Unit Limits (Academic Load Regulations)

The University may impose limits on the number of units for which a student can register during each registration period. To learn about these Academic Load Regulations visit http://www.csun.edu/anr/soc/academicpolicies.html.

Students wishing to enroll in additional units after the Registration-by-Appointment period must complete and file an Extra Unit Authorization form with Admissions and Records. There are also restrictions for students based on their academic status. Students on academic probation and undergraduates readmitted under Academic Performance Agreement are limited to 13 units.

A-13. Academic Internship Policy

  1. An Academic Internship shall be defined as undergraduate courses in which experience is the predominant teaching-learning mode. This faculty-approved experience shall be in organizations other than the academic departments that offer the courses. These courses shall include significant involvement of students and hosts with faculty in planning, processing, and evaluating the learning resulting from these experiences Normally, Academic Internship courses shall be at the Upper-Division level. Upon justification by the department, however, exceptions may be granted by the Educational Policies Committee (EPC) to allow for Lower-Division Academic Internship.
  2. Academic Internship shall not include Supervised Student Teaching.
  3. Academic Internship credit shall not be granted after the fact or for prior life experience.
  4. The University and the participating organizations shall adhere to equity and diversity guidelines.
  5. Academic Internship shall include the following elements:
  1. Identified relationship to the academic discipline(s) offering the course.
  2. Screening or selection procedures for students seeking to enroll in these courses, which shall be designated as restrictive.
  3. An orientation to experiential learning concepts.
  4. A written learning agreement accepted by students, faculty, and host describing the activities, learning processes, and evaluation methods used in the course.
  5. In addition to activities required by the instructor, a minimum of 120 work hours per semester is expected for a three unit course. Individual courses may require work hours beyond this minimum.
  6. A mid-semester evaluation of each student and the internship experience by the instructor.
  7. Facilitation of learning by the instructor throughout the experience, including both a written element: educational journal, reports, and/or portfolios; and a student contact element: seminars or group meetings.
  8. Academic credit shall be granted upon instructors’ determination of students’ learning. This process for final determination of academic credit shall be defined in the learning agreement and include contributions by student and host.
  1. Departments may not offer Academic Internship under a 499 designation as Independent Study.
  2. All Academic Internship courses shall be given the same number, e.g., 394, 494, 594, in all departments that offer them.
  3. Normally, students’ performances in Academic Internship shall be evaluated on a Credit/No Credit basis. However, upon justification by the department and approval by the EPC, a different basis of grading may be added (e.g., A-F, CR/NC/U).
  4. Normally, a student may count no more than 6 units of Academic Internship course credit toward a major. However, upon justification by the department, the EPC may allow up to a total of 12 units. A student may count no more than 12 units of academic internship course credit toward a baccalaureate degree.

Appendix B Fees

B-1. Fees

Tuition versus Fees: Tuition is not charged to legal residents of California; however, legal residents are subject to the fees as stated here. Nonresident tuition must be paid by all students classified as nonresidents. Fees are subject to change by the Trustees of The California State University without advance notice.

B-2. Schedule of Fees, 2009-2010

The CSU makes every effort to keep student costs to a minimum. Fees listed in published schedules or student accounts may need to be increased when public funding is inadequate. Therefore, CSU must reserve the right, even after initial fee payments are made, to increase or modify any listed fees, without notice, until the date when instruction for a particular semester or quarter has begun. All CSU listed fees should be regarded as estimates that are subject to change upon approval by The Board of Trustees.

The following reflects applicable systemwide fees and nonresident tuition for both semester and quarter campuses.

All Students

Application Fee (nonrefundable), payable by check or money order at time application is made: $55

Fees

For all fees, please: Visit the University Cash Services Website.

B-3. Policy on Prosecution for Theft and Bad Checks

It is the policy of California State University, Northridge to prosecute individuals for theft, such as shoplifting, and the issuance of worthless documents, such as bad checks, wherever occurring on campus. All persons committing such acts are subject to prosecution by civil authorities under the California Penal Code. In addition to the penalties possible under the Penal Code, a student may be disciplined under Section 41301 of Title V, California Code of Regulations, and may be expelled, suspended, placed on probation, and/or have his/her records encumbered. University employees committing such acts may also be subject to disciplinary action under Section 89535 of the California Education Code.

Every act of theft or the issuance of a worthless document is a burden that falls upon the whole community, if in no other way, imposing an expense to the general public. This burden is magnified in the educational community where every additional expense is a real sacrifice to those involved in education. Moreover, such actions are an antithesis to what is expected of a campus community. Since it would be less than realistic to assume that these acts would not occur on campus, it is necessary that the educational community adopt those practices which society has developed to protect itself.

California State University, Northridge shall employ those measures available to it under California laws and University policy to prosecute for theft and the issuance of worthless documents. Such measures include the utilization of Section 1719 of the California Civil Code (AB 1226) which permits the recipient of a bad check to recover the amount owing upon such check plus three times its face value up to a limit of $500 in a court of competent jurisdiction. In addition, Title V, California Code of Regulations, includes Auxiliary Organizations as an integral part of the campus. To provide an overall shield against the aforedescribed acts, compatible policies and procedures will be utilized by each Auxiliary Organization in cooperation with the University.

Policies and procedures developed in accord with this statement shall be filed with and available for inspection in the Office of the Special Assistant to the President.

B-4. Refund of Fees Including Nonresident Tuition

Regulations governing the refund of mandatory fees, including nonresident tuition, for students enrolling at the California State University are included in Section 41802 of Title 5, California Code of Regulations. For purposes of the refund policy, mandatory fees are defined as those systemwide fees and campus fees that are required to be paid in order to enroll in state-supported academic programs at the California State University. Refunds of fees and tuition charges for self-support programs at the California State University (courses offered through extended education) are governed by a separate policy established by the University.

In order to receive a full refund of mandatory fees, including nonresident tuition, a student must cancel registration or drop all courses prior to the first day of instruction for the term. Information on procedures and deadlines for canceling registration and dropping classes is available at Visit the Admissions and Records Website.

For state-supported semesters, quarters, and non-standard terms or courses of four (4) weeks or more, a student who withdraws during the term in accordance with the university’s established procedures will receive a refund of mandatory fees, including nonresident tuition, based on the portion of the term during which the student was enrolled. No student withdrawing after the 60 percent point in the term will be entitled to a refund of any mandatory fees or nonresident tuition.

For state-supported semesters, quarters, and non-standard terms or courses of less than four (4) weeks, no refunds of mandatory fees and nonresident tuition will be made unless a student cancels registration or drops all classes prior to the first day in accordance with the university’s established procedures and deadlines.

Students will also receive a refund of mandatory fees, including nonresident tuition, under the following circumstances:

  • The tuition and mandatory fees were assessed or collected in error;
  • The course for which the tuition and mandatory fees were assessed or collected was cancelled by the university;
  • The university makes a delayed decision that the student was not eligible to enroll in the term for which mandatory fees were assessed and collected and the delayed decision was not due to incomplete or inaccurate information provided by the student; or
  • The student was activated for compulsory military service.

Students who are not entitled to a refund as described above may petition the university for a refund demonstrating exceptional circumstances and the chief financial officer of the university or designee may authorize a refund if he or she determines that the fees and tuition were not earned by the university.

Information concerning any aspect of the refund of fees may be obtained from University Cash Services.

B-5. Fees and Debts Owed to the Institution

Should a student or former student fail to pay a fee or a debt owed to the institution, the institution may “withhold permission to register, to use facilities for which a fee is authorized to be charged, to receive services, materials, food or merchandise or any combination of the above from any person owing a debt” until the debt is paid (see Title 5, California Code of Regulations, Sections 42380 and 42381).

Prospective students who register for courses offered by the university are obligated for the payment of fees associated with registration for those courses. Failure to cancel registration in any course for an academic term prior to the first day of the academic term gives rise to an obligation to pay student fees including any tuition for the reservation of space in the course.

The institution may withhold permission to register or to receive official transcripts of grades or other services offered by the institution from anyone owing fees or another debt to the institution. The institution may also report the debt to a credit bureau, offset the amount due against any future state tax refunds due the student, refer the debt to an outside collection agency and/or charge the student actual and reasonable collection costs, including reasonable attorney fees if litigation is necessary, in collecting any amount not paid when due.

If a person believes he or she does not owe all or part of an asserted unpaid obligation, that person may contact the campus business office. The business office, or another office on campus to which the business office may refer the person, will review all pertinent information provided by the person and available to the campus and will advise the person of its conclusions.

B-6. Fee Waivers

The California Education Code includes provisions for the waiver of mandatory systemwide fees as follows:

Section 66025.3– Qualifying children, spouses/registered domestic partners, or unmarried surviving spouses/registered domestic partners of a war period veteran of the U.S. military who is totally service-connected disabled or who died as a result of service-related causes; children of any veteran of the U.S. military who has a service-connected disability, was killed in action, or died of a service-connected disability and meets specified income provisions; any dependents or surviving spouse/registered domestic partner who has not remarried of a member of the California National Guard who in the line of duty and in active service of the state was killed or became permanently disabled or died of a disability as a result of an event while in active service of the state; and undergraduate students who are the recipient of or the child of a recipient of a Congressional Medal of Honor and meet certain age and income restrictions;

Section 68075 (a)– An undergraduate student who is a member of the Armed Forces of the United States stationed in this state on active duty, except a member of the Armed Forces assigned for educational purposes to a state-supported institution of higher education, is entitled to resident classification only for the purpose of determining the amount of tuition and fees.

(b) A student seeking a graduate degree who is a member of the Armed Forces of the United States stationed in this state on active duty, except a member of the Armed Forces assigned for educational purposes to a state-supported institution of higher education, shall be entitled to resident classification only for the purpose of determining the amount of tuition and fees for no more than two academic years, and shall thereafter be subject to Article 5 (commencing with Section 68060).

Section 68120– Qualifying children and surviving spouses/registered domestic partners of deceased public law enforcement or fire suppression employees who were California residents and who were killed in the course of active law enforcement or fire suppression duties (referred to as Alan Pattee Scholarships); and

Section 68121- Qualifying students enrolled in an undergraduate program who are the surviving dependent of any individual killed in the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center in New York City, the Pentagon building in Washington, D.C., or the crash of United Airlines Flight 93 in southwestern Pennsylvania, if the student meets the financial need requirements set forth in Section 69432.7 for the Cal Grant A Program and either the surviving dependent or the individual killed in the attacks was a resident of California on September 11, 2001.

Students who may qualify for these benefits should contact the Admissions/Registrar’s Office for further information and/or an eligibility determination.

B-7. Procedure for the Establishment or Abolishment of a Student Body Fee

The law governing the California State University provides that fees defined as mandatory, such as a student body association fee and a student body center fee, may be established. A student body association fee must be established upon a favorable vote of two-thirds of the students voting in an election held for this purpose (Education Code, Section 89300). A student body center fee may be established only after a fee referendum is held which approves by a two-thirds favorable vote the establishment of the fee (Education Code, Section 89304). The student body fee was established at CSUN by student referendum. The campus President may adjust the student body association fee only after the fee adjustment has been approved by a majority of students voting in a referendum established for that purpose (Education Code, Section 89300). The required fee shall be subject to referendum at any time upon the presentation of a petition to the campus President containing the signatures of 10 percent of the regularly enrolled students at the University. Once bonds are issued, authority to set and adjust student body center fees is governed by provisions of the State University Revenue Bond Act of 1947, including, but not limited to, Education Code sections 90012, 90027, and 90068. Student body association fees support a variety of cultural and recreational programs, childcare centers, and special student support programs.

The process to establish and adjust other campus-based mandatory fees requires consideration by the campus fee advisory committee and a student referendum. The campus President may use alternate consultation mechanisms if he/she determines that a referendum is not the best mechanism to achieve appropriate and meaningful consultation. Results of the referendum and the fee committee review are advisory to the campus President. The President may adjust campus-based mandatory fees but must request the Chancellor to establish a new mandatory fee. The President shall provide to the fee advisory committee a report of all campus-based mandatory fees. The campus shall report annually to the Chancellor a complete inventory of all campus-based mandatory fees.

For more information or questions, please contact the Budget Office in the CSU Chancellor’s Office at (562) 951-4560.

Appendix C: Privacy and Student Information

C-1. Privacy Rights of Students in Education Records

The federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (20 U.S.C. 1232g) and regulations adopted thereunder (34 C.F.R. 99) set out requirements designed to protect students’ privacy in their records maintained by the campus. The statute and regulations govern access to certain student records maintained by the campus and the release of such records. The law provides that the campus must give students access to most records directly related to the student, and must also provide opportunity for a hearing to challenge the records if the student claims they are inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise inappropriate. The right to a hearing under this law does not include any right to challenge the appropriateness of a grade determined by the instructor. The law generally requires the institution to receive a student’s written consent before releasing personally identifiable data about the student. The institution has adopted a set of policies and procedures governing implementation of the statute and the regulations. Copies of these policies and procedures may be obtained at the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs or Visit the Policies and Procedures Website.

Among the types of information included in the campus statement of policies and procedures are:

  1. the types of student records maintained and the information they contain;
  2. the official responsible for maintaining each type of record;
  3. the location of access lists indicating persons requesting or receiving information from the record;
  4. policies for reviewing and expunging records;
  5. student access rights to their records;
  6. the procedures for challenging the content of student records;
  7. the cost to be charged for reproducing copies of records; and
  8. the right of the student to file a complaint with the Department of Education.

The Department of Education has established an office and review board to investigate complaints and adjudicate violations. The designated office is: Family Policy Compliance Office, U.S. Department of Education, Washington, D.C. 20202-4605.

The campus is authorized under the Act to release “directory information” concerning students. At CSU, Northridge, “directory information” the student’s name, address, telephone number, e-mail address, photograph, date and place of birth, major field of study, dates of attendance, grade level, enrollment status (e.g. undergraduate or graduate, full-time or part-time), participation in official university activities and sports, weight and height of athletic team members, degrees, honors and awards received, and most recent educational institution attended. For student employees, directory information shall also include the department where employed and employee status (i.e., Graduate Assistant, Instructional Student Assistant, Teaching Associate).The above-designated information is subject to release by the campus at any time unless the campus has received prior written objection from the student specifying what information the student requests not be released. Written objections should be sent to the Office of Admission and Records

The campus is authorized to provide access to student records to campus officials and employees who have legitimate educational interests in such access. These persons have responsibilities in the campus’s academic, administrative or service functions and have reason for accessing student records associated with their campus or other related academic responsibilities. Student records may also be disclosed to other persons or organizations under certain conditions (e.g., as part of the accreditation or program evaluation; in response to a court order or subpoena; in connection with financial aid; or to other institutions to which the student is transferring).

C-2. Use of Social Security Number

Applicants are required to include their correct social security numbers in designated places on applications for admission pursuant to the authority contained in Section 41201, Title 5, California Code of Regulations, and Section 6109 of the Internal Revenue Code (26 U.S.C. 6109). The University uses the social security number to identify students and their records including identification for purposes of financial aid eligibility and disbursement and the repayment of financial aid and other debts payable to the institution. Also, the Internal Revenue Service requires the University to file information returns that include the student’s social security number and other information such as the amount paid for qualified tuition, related expenses, and interest on educational loans. This information is used by the IRS to help determine whether a student, or a person claiming a student as a dependent, may take a credit or deduction to reduce federal income taxes.

C-3. Career Placement

The Office of Human Resources may furnish, upon request, information about the employment of students who graduate from programs or courses of study preparing students for a particular career field. Any such data provided must be in a form that does not allow for the identification of any individual student. This information includes data concerning the average starting salary and the percentage of previously enrolled students who obtained employment. The information may include data collected from either graduates of the campus or graduates of all campuses in the California State University system.

Appendix D: Nondiscrimination Policies

D-1. Nondiscrimination Policies

California State University, Northridge is comprised of individuals from diverse backgrounds. It takes pride in being a culturally pluralistic campus that promotes equal opportunity and ethnic cultural harmony. As such, it is essential that the entire University community recognize the need for an awareness of, sensitivity to and respect for the cultural heritage, gender and sexual orientation of others. Individual (s) or group (s) actions or activities that promote degrading or demeaning social stereotypes based upon age, disability, ethnicity, gender, national origin, religion or sexual orientation will not be tolerated. Students who behave abusively toward members of the campus community based on the aforementioned criteria will face serious consequences and will be subject to disciplinary action. Any student who commits acts of discrimination or harassment manifested by acts or threats of physical abuse, verbal abuse and/or hazing activities may be subject to suspension or expulsion from the University.

D-2. Race, Color, Ethnicity, National Origin, Age and Religion

The California State University complies with the requirements of Title VI and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as well as other applicable federal and state laws prohibiting discrimination. No person shall, on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, national origin, age, or religion be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be otherwise subjected to discrimination in any program of the California State University.

California State University, Northridge, complies with the California Education Code, Chapter 3, Students, Article 3, Accommodation of Religious Creed, Section 89320, which states, in part: “in administering any test or examination, permit any student who is eligible to undergo the test or examination to do so, without penalty, at a time when that activity would not violate the student’s religious creed. This requirement shall not apply in the event that administering the test or examination at an alternate time would impose an unde hardship which could not reasonably have been avoided. In any court proceeding in which the existence of an undue hardship which could not reasonabley have been avoided is an issue, the burden of proof shall be upon the institution”. Inquiries and complaints are referred to the Office of Equity and Diversity (OED), University Hall, Room 285, telephone (818) 677-2077.

California State University, Northridge does not discriminate on the basis of marital status, religion or sexual orientation by California State University Board of Trustees policy.

D-3. Disability

The California State University does not discriminate on the basis of disability in admission or access to, or treatment or employment in, its programs and activities. Federal laws, including sections 504 and 508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, and various state laws prohibit such discrimination. The Director of Equity and Diversity has been designated to coordinate the efforts of CSUN to comply with all relevant disability laws. Inquiries concerning compliance may be addressed to the Director of Equity and Diversity, University Hall 385 (818) 677-2077.

D-4. Sex/Gender

The California State University does not discriminate on the basis of sex, gender or sexual orientation in the educational programs or activities it conducts. Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 and certain other federal and state laws prohibit discrimination on these bases in education programs and activities operated by CSUN. Such programs and activities include admission of students and employment. Inquiries concerning the application these laws to programs and activities of CSUN may be referred to the Office of Equity and Diversity, the campus officer(s) assigned the administrative responsibility of reviewing such matters or to the Office of Civil Rights:

Region IX, 50 Beale Street, Suite 7200 San Francisco, California 94105. The California State University is committed to providing equal opportunities to male and female CSU students in all campus programs, including intercollegiate athletics.

D-5. Policy on Sexual Assault and Acquaintance Rape

California State University, Northridge will not tolerate sexual assault in any form, including date/acquaintance rape. Every allegation of sexual assault will be taken seriously. Where there is reason to believe that the University’s regulations prohibiting sexual assault have been violated, the University will pursue strong disciplinary action. This discipline includes the possibility of suspension and dismissal or termination from the University.

Any employee, student or other person at California State University, Northridge who commits a rape or other crime of a sexual nature specified in the California Penal Code can be criminally prosecuted. In addition, employees and students can be disciplined under the California Education Code even if the criminal justice authorities or the person assaulted choose not to pursue criminal prosecution. Further information is available at The Policies and Procedures Website.

D-6. Accommodation of Religious Creed

California State University, Northridge, complies with the California Education Code, Chapter 3, Students, Article 3, Accommodation of Religious Creed, Section 89320, which states, in part: “in administering any test or examination, permit any student who is eligible to undergo the test or examination to do so, without penalty, at a time when that activity would not violate the student’s religious creed. This requirement shall not apply in the event that administering the test or examination at an alternate time would impose an unde hardship which could not reasonably have been avoided. In any court proceeding in which the existence of an undue hardship which could not reasonabley have been avoided is an issue, the burden of proof shall be upon the institution”. Inquiries and complaints are referred to the Office of Equity and Diversity (OED), in UN 285, (818) 677-2077.

D-7. Policy on Sexual Harassment

Sexual harassment is prohibited at the California State University, Northridge by Executive Order No. 927. Sexual harassment is defined as gender-related verbal or physical conduct that has the intent or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s education performance by creating an intimidating, hostile or offensive environment. Sexual harassment includes such behavior as sexual advances, request for sexual favors, repeated derogatory remarks of a sexist nature and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature directed toward a student (s) when one or more of the following circumstances are present:

  • Submission to or toleration of conduct is an explicit or implicit term or condition of academic evaluation;
  • Submission to or rejection of such conduct is used as a basis for an academic evaluation;
  • The conduct has the purpose or effect of interfering with a student’s academic performance or creating an intimidating, hostile, offensive or otherwise learning environment or adversely affecting any student.

California State University, Northridge is committed to creating and maintaining a working and learning environment free from sexual harassment of its students and those who apply to be students. Sexual harassment violates both personal integrity and professional responsibility and will not be tolerated by the University. It subverts the mission of the University and damages the careers, educational experience and well being of students, faculty and staff. The intimidation, whether obvious or subtle, involved in sexual harassment stifles personal and intellectual development and attacks the principle of honesty and academic freedom that is the responsibility of the University and its agents to foster. Sexual harassment undermines the respect students and the community have for the University and endangers the credibility of its degrees and scholarship.

D-8. Complaint Procedures (Discrimination and Harassment)

All students, faculty and staff should be aware that California State University, Northridge condemns and will take action to eliminate all forms of prohibited discrimination and harassment. Prohibited discrimination and harassment are conduct that may be subject to disciplinary action. Sexual harassment complaints should be reported to the Office of Equity and Diversity, University Hall Room 285, 818-677-2077 or to a manager, administrator or supervisor.

Scope of Procedures: Federal and state law defines prohibited forms of discrimination and harassment. The University provides both informal and formal procedures for addressing complaints through the Student Grievance Procedures. Complainants will be informed by the Office of Equity and Diversity of both informal and applicable formal procedures available to members of the campus community. The Office of Equity and Diversity is responsible for maintaining files on all reported cases of discrimination and harassment and will act as a consultant on all investigations.

Informal Procedures: Initial efforts to resolve complaints informally may be taken by the appropriate manager(s) and/or the Office of Equity and Diversity emphasizing resolutions through informal conversation and dialogue with the parties involved. However, all members of the University have the right to file a formal complaint at any time within the time limits imposed by the formal procedures

Formal Procedures: Students may file a formal complaint under the Discrimination Grievance Procedures for Students. This document can be obtained from the Equity and Diversity Office (University Hall – Room 285) and contains specific guideline information and the form used to execute the complaint process. The formal procedures require students to file formal complaints within 180 days of the dates the students knew or should have known of the events that give rise to the complaints.

D-9. Other Discrimination and Harassment Complaints/Grievance Procedures

Discrimination and harassment violate Title VI of the Civil Rights Acts of 1964 and 1991, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1974, the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, California Law and the Executive Orders of the California State University Board of Trustees. Students may obtain written instructions from the Office of Equity and Diversity in University Hall 285.

Appendix E. Student Conduct

E-1. Student Conduct Code

  1. Campus Community Values
    The University is committed to maintaining a safe and healthy living and learning environment for students, faculty, and staff. Each member of the campus community should choose behaviors that contribute toward this end. Students are expected to be good citizens and to engage in responsible behaviors that reflect well upon their university, to be civil to one another and to others in the campus community, and contribute positively to student and university life.
  2. Grounds for Student Discipline
    Student behavior that is not consistent with the Student Conduct Code is addressed through an educational process that is designed to promote safety and good citizenship and, when necessary, impose appropriate consequences.

The following are the grounds upon which student discipline can be based:

  1. Dishonesty, including:
  1. Cheating, plagiarism, or other forms of academic dishonesty that are intended to gain unfair academic advantage.
  2. Furnishing false information to a University official, faculty member, or campus office.
  3. Forgery, alteration, or misuse of a University document, key, or identification instrument.
  4. Misrepresenting one’s self to be an authorized agent of the University or one of its auxiliaries.
  1. Unauthorized entry into, presence in, use of, or misuse of University property.
  2. Willful, material and substantial disruption or obstruction of a University-related activity, or any on-campus activity.
  3. Participating in an activity that substantially and materially disrupts the normal operations of the University, or infringes on the rights of members of the University community.
  4. Willful, material and substantial obstruction of the free flow of pedestrian or other traffic, on or leading to campus property or an off-campus University related activity.
  5. Disorderly, lewd, indecent, or obscene behavior at a University related activity, or directed toward a member of the University community.
  6. Conduct that threatens or endangers the health or safety of any person within or related to the University community, including physical abuse, threats, intimidation, harassment, or sexual misconduct.
  7. Hazing, or conspiracy to haze. Hazing is defined as any method of initiation or pre-initiation into a student organization or student body, whether or not the organization or body is officially recognized by an educational institution, which is likely to cause serious bodily injury to any former, current, or prospective student of any school, community college, college, university or other educational institution in this state (Penal Code 245.6), and in addition, any act likely to cause physical harm, personal degradation or disgrace resulting in physical or mental harm, to any former, current, or prospective student of any school, community college, college, university or other educational institution. The term “hazing” does not include customary athletic events or school sanctioned events.

Neither the express or implied consent of a victim of hazing, nor the lack of active participation in a particular hazing incident is a defense. Apathy or acquiescence in the presence of hazing is not a neutral act, and is also a violation of this section.

  1. Use, possession, manufacture, or distribution of illegal drugs or drug- related paraphernalia, (except as expressly permitted by law and University regulations) or the misuse of legal pharmaceutical drugs.
  2. Use, possession, manufacture, or distribution of alcoholic beverages (except as expressly permitted by law and University regulations), or public intoxication while on campus or at a University related activity.
  3. Theft of property or services from the University community, or misappropriation of University resources.
  4. Unauthorized destruction, or damage to University property or other property in the University community.
  5. Possession or misuse of firearms or guns, replicas, ammunition, explosives, fireworks, knives, other weapons, or dangerous chemicals (without the prior authorization of the campus president) on campus or at a University related activity.
  6. Unauthorized recording, dissemination, or publication of academic presentations (including handwritten notes) for a commercial purpose.
  7. Misuse of computer facilities or resources, including:
  1. Unauthorized entry into a file, for any purpose.
  2. Unauthorized transfer of a file.
  3. Use of another’s identification or password.
  4. Use of computing facilities, campus network, or other resources to interfere with the work of another member of the University community.
  5. Use of computing facilities and resources to send obscene or intimidating and abusive messages.
  6. Use of computing facilities and resources to interfere with normal University operations.
  7. Use of computing facilities and resources in violation of copyright laws.
  8. Violation of a campus computer use policy.
  1. Violation of any published University policy, rule, regulation or presidential order.
  2. Failure to comply with directions or, or interference with, any University official or any public safety officer while acting in the performance of his/her duties.
  3. Any act chargeable as a violation of a federal, state, or local law that poses a substantial threat to the safety or well being of members of the University community, to property within the University community or poses a significant threat of disruption or interference with University operations.
  4. Violation of the Student Conduct Procedures, including:
  1. Falsification, distortion, or misrepresentation of information related to a student discipline matter.
  2. Disruption or interference with the orderly progress of a student discipline proceeding.
  3. Initiation of a student discipline proceeding in bad faith.
  4. Attempting to discourage another from participating in the student discipline matter.
  5. Attempting to influence the impartiality of any participant in a student discipline matter.
  6. Verbal or physical harassment or intimidation of any participant in a student discipline matter.
  7. Failure to comply with the sanction(s) imposed under a student discipline proceeding.
  1. Encouraging, permitting, or assisting another to do any act that could subject him or her to discipline.
  1. Procedures for Enforcing This Code
    The Chancellor shall adopt procedures to ensure students are afforded appropriate notice and an opportunity to be heard before the University imposes any sanction for a violation of the Student Conduct Code.
  2. Application of This Code
    Sanctions for the conduct listed above can be imposed on applicants, enrolled students, students between academic terms, graduates awaiting degrees, and students who withdraw from school while a disciplinary matter is pending. Conduct that threatens the safety or security of the campus community, or substantially disrupts the functions or operation of the University is within the jurisdiction of this Article regardless of whether it occurs on or off campus. Nothing in this Code may conflict with Education Code Section 66301 that prohibits disciplinary action against students based on behavior protected by theFirst Amendment.

Note: Authority cited: Sections 66017, 66452, 66600, 69810, 89030, 89030.1 and 89035, Education Code. Reference: Sections 66450, 69813 et seq. and 89030, Education Code; and Section 245.6, Penal Code.

E-2. Academic Dishonesty

The maintenance of academic integrity and quality education is the responsibility of each student within this university and the California State University system. Cheating or plagiarism in connection with an academic program at a campus is listed in Section 41301, Title V, California Code of Regulations, as an offense for which a student may be expelled, suspended, or given a less severe disciplinary sanction. Academic dishonesty is an especially serious offense and diminishes the quality of scholarship and defrauds those who depend upon the integrity of the campus programs. Such dishonesty includes:

Cheating

Intentionally using or attempting to use unauthorized materials, information, or study aids in any academic exercise. Comments:

  1. Faculty members are encouraged to state in advance their policies and procedures concerning examinations and other academic exercises as well as the use before examinations of shared study aids, examination files, and other related materials and forms of assistance.
  2. Students completing any examination should assume that external assistance (e.g., books, notes, calculators, pagers, cell phones/cameras, PDAs, other electronic devices, conversation with others) is prohibited unless specifically authorized by the instructor.
  3. Students must not allow others to conduct research or prepare any work for them without advance authorization from the instructor. This comment includes, but is not limited to, the services of commercial term paper companies.
  4. Substantial portions of the same academic work may not be submitted for credit in more than one course without authorization.

Fabrication

Intentional falsification or invention of any information or citation in an academic exercise. Comments:

  1. “Invented’’ information may not be used in any laboratory experiment or other academic exercise without notice to and authorization from the instructor. It would be improper, for example, to analyze one sample in an experiment and covertly “invent’’ data based on that single experiment for several more required analyses.
  2. One should acknowledge reliance upon the actual source from which cited information was obtained. For example, a writer should not reproduce a quotation from a book review and indicate that the quotation was obtained from the book itself.
  3. Students who attempt to alter and resubmit returned academic work with intent to defraud the faculty member will be in violation of this section. For example, a student may not change an answer on a returned exam and then claim that they deserve additional credit.

Facilitating Academic Dishonesty

Intentionally or knowingly helping or attempting to help another to commit an act of academic dishonesty.

Comments: For example, one who knowingly allowed another to copy from his or her paper during an examination would be in violation of this section.

Plagiarism

Intentionally or knowingly representing the words, ideas, or work of another as one’s own in any academic exercise. Comments:

  1. Direct Quotation: Every direct quotation must be identified by quotation marks, or by appropriate indentation or by other means of identification, and must be promptly cited in a footnote. Proper footnote style for any academic department is outlined by the MLA Style Sheet or K. L. Turabian’s A Manual for Writers of Term Papers, Theses and Dissertations. These and similar publications are available in the Matador Bookstore and at the reference desk of the Oviatt Library.
  2. Paraphrase: Prompt acknowledgment is required when material from another source is paraphrased or summarized in whole or in part in your own words. To acknowledge a paraphrase properly, one might state: “to paraphrase Locke’s comment . . .’’ and conclude with a footnote identifying the exact reference. A footnote acknowledging only a directly quoted statement does not suffice to notify the reader of any preceding or succeeding paraphrased material.
  3. Borrowed Facts or Information: Information obtained in one’s reading or research which is not common knowledge among students in the course must be acknowledged. Examples of common knowledge might include the names of leaders of prominent nations, basic scientific laws, etc.

Materials which contribute only to one’s general understanding of the subject may be acknowledged in the bibliography and need not be immediately footnoted. One footnote is usually sufficient to acknowledge indebtedness when a number of connected sentences in the paper draw their special information from one source. When direct quotations are used, however, quotation marks must be inserted and prompt acknowledgment is required.

E-3. Faculty Policy on Academic Dishonesty

Evaluation of student performance is the exclusive province of the faculty. The faculty have the responsibility to make reasonable efforts to guarantee that work is done by the student who is to receive credit for its completion. More specifically, examinations should be appropriately proctored or monitored to prevent students from copying or exchanging information; examinations and answers to examination questions should be secured in a way that students cannot have prior access to them; the authenticity of quotations and references should be reviewed to assure the faculty member that proper credit is given for ideas and information taken from other sources, etc. Having carried out these responsibilities if, in the faculty member’s opinion, there is evidence of academic dishonesty on the part of a student, it is the faculty member’s responsibility to take action against the student as described in the options below.

Even if a faculty member does not request disciplinary action against a student, he/she is encouraged to report acts of academic dishonesty to the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs because a student may engage in such behavior in other classes, departments, or schools. If reports of alleged academic dishonesty do not reach one central office, repeated acts may go undetected and recidivism will be difficult or impossible to monitor. Communication with the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs may also assist the faculty member in determining which option or combination of options to exercise.

Depending upon the severity of the offense and the student’s disciplinary history as it relates to acts of academic dishonesty, the faculty member may elect to exercise the following options:

  1. Assign a lower or failing grade to an assignment, examination, or the entire course. In cases in which the faculty member elects to exercise the grade penalty option, the faculty member must inform the student in a timely manner that academic dishonesty was a factor in the evaluation. In cases where the sanction for an act of academic dishonesty has been the assignment of a grade penalty without a simultaneous request for formal disciplinary action and in which the student wishes to challenge the grade penalty assigned, the student may file an appeal with the Academic Grievance and Grade Appeals Board.
  2. Request that the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs notify the student that information related to the student’s alleged act of academic dishonesty within that particular class has been forwarded to the Associate Vice President for Student Affairs. Such notifications are in the form of an admonitory letter and serve to inform the student that the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs is aware of the alleged incident and that formal disciplinary action will not be taken. The admonitory letter also apprises the student of the Student Conduct Code and of sanctions that would be levied for violations of that code, and affords the student an opportunity to meet with the Associate Vice President for Student Affairs to discuss the matter. The admonitory letter shall not be released for any purpose and shall not become part of the student’s permanent record.
  3. Request disciplinary action against the student. Student discipline is exclusively the province of the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs. In such cases, the faculty member through the department chair and school dean should submit a formal written report of the incident to the Associate Vice President for Student Affairs and request formal disciplinary action. Associate Vice President for Student Affairs is empowered to investigate all instances of academic dishonesty. The cases are resolved either through an appropriate action accepted by the student or through a disciplinary hearing. The faculty member, department chair, and school dean will be notified of the final disposition of the case. In cases where the faculty member chooses both to impose a grade penalty and requests formal student disciplinary action against the student and the student wishes to challenge the grade penalty, the student may file an appeal with the Academic Grievance and Grade Appeals Board only after the student disciplinary case has been fully adjudicated by the Associate Vice President for Student Affairs.

(The information in section was adapted with permission from the on Academic Dishonesty issued by the University of Maryland [1980] and is also taken from the Academic Dishonesty Policy approved by the Faculty Senate, May 13, 1982.)

E-4. Penalties for Academic Dishonesty

Pursant to CSU Executive Order 969, all actions taken by faculty based on student academic dishonesty, including the imposition of a grade penalty, must be reported to the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs.

Disciplinary records of any action of academic dishonesty are retained in the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs These records may be available to prospective employers and other educational institutions, in accordance with federal and state regulations. In short, a student committing any act of academic dishonesty will run a serious risk of harming his or her future educational or employment opportunities.

Students wishing to report an act of academic dishonesty should call (818) 677-2391 and ask for the Associate Vice President for Student Affairs/Dean of Students, who will investigate such reports. Information may be provided anonymously; disciplinary action, however, cannot be taken on the basis of anonymous reports alone.

E-5. Grade Correction Procedure

The University considers all grades reported at the end of each semester to be final. Students are responsible for reviewing their grades for accuracy before the end of the subsequent semester. Students who believe they have received a grade in error should promptly ask the instructor to verify and, if appropriate, correct the grade.

Grades received for the semester of graduation will be considered sealed 60 days after the official date of graduation. However, the deadline to request a grade correction is the end of the semester following that in which the grade was assigned. If the instructor is absent from campus during the subsequent semester, students should promptly consult with the department chair about the grade in question. If the department chair is unable tocontact the instructor, he/she will notify the Associate Dean of the College in writing that an extension of the grade correction deadline, up to one year, has been granted.

E-6. Retention of Student Work Policy

  1. Document Retention Timeframes: Faculty shall retain the final examination and other materials, including materials in an electronic form, which contribute to the student’s final grade, and which are not returned to the student or otherwise not made available in class to the student, in accordance with the following timeframes:
  1. Spring Semester: Materials from the spring semester will be retained until the end of the first week of the following spring semester.
  2. Summer Term: Materials from the summer term will be retained until the end of the first week of the following spring semester.
  3. Fall Semester: Materials from the fall semester will be retained until the end of the first week of the following fall semester.
  4. Winter Intersession: Materials from the winter intersession will be retained until the end of the first week of the following fall semester.

When a faculty member has received notice as to the filing of an academic grievance or grade appeal from the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs, all related course materials, including materials in an electronic form, shall be retained until the case is resolved.

  1. Student’s Responsibility: It is the student’s responsibility to pick up from the faculty materials that have been made available to students in class.
  2. Departing Faculty: Departments are encouraged to collect from departing faculty all materials as specified above, including materials in an electronic form, which contribute to the student’s final grade and retain such materials for a period consistent with the time frames provided above.

E-7 Academic Grievances and Grade Appeals

The University provides procedures for the orderly processing of grievances by students against members of the faculty, and for the appeal of assigned grades. Established by the Faculty Senate, these procedures are contained in the Academic Grievance and Grade Appeals Board Bylaws. The Board is empowered to act upon grievances and appeals which are properly filed.

Academic grievances may be filed when a student feels aggrieved in (non-grade) matters concerning an academic decision, action or judgment by a faculty member. A grade appeal may be filed when a student believes a grade is based on error, violation of University rule or policy, refusal by the instructor to report a grade, discrimination or other improper conduct towards the student. Grade appeals based wholly or in part on a subjective or qualitative judgment of an instructor will not be considered by the Board.

Students should attempt to resolve matters informally with the faculty member prior to filing an academic grievance or grade appeal. Students should also seek the review of the appropriate department chair and school dean or designee. If the matter cannot be resolved in this manner, the student may file a formal grievance or grade appeal.The grievance or appeal must be presented in writing before the end of the semester following the semester in which the matter occurred or the grade was assigned.

Information and forms for filing an academic grievance or grade appeal may be obtained from the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs or by calling (818) 677-2391.

E-8. University Policy on Alcohol and Other Drugs

The University Policy regarding the possession, use, and/or sale of alcoholic beverages or illicit drugs on campus is governed by state and municipal law and further governed by the Student Conduct Code, Title V, California Code of Regulations. Other University regulations are found in the campus policy on the use of alcohol and illicit drugs which is available online at The Policies and Procedures Website. The University expects that individuals and groups will conduct themselves and operate within the scope of these laws and University policies and regulations. Proven violations of these laws, policies, and regulations will lead to serious consequences and may include criminal prosecution as well as disciplinary action. For further information please contact the Klotz Student Health Center at (818) 677-3685 or the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs at (818) 677-2391.

E-9. University Policy on Smoking

It is the policy of California State University, Northridge to promote a smoke-free environment for our employees, students, and visitors and to encourage non-smoking lifestyles. Smoking is prohibited in all areas enclosed by the outermost walls of buildings including space such as restrooms, storage space, atriums, balconies, stairwells, and other similar features, in outdoor dining facilities posted as smoke-free, in athletic and recreational facilities’ seating areas, in state/university owned vehicles, and within 20 feet of entrances, exits and operable windows of buildings.

These regulations are set forth in the University Policy and Procedures which can be found at The Policies and Procedures Website.

E-10. Violence in the Workplace

California State University, Northridge, is committed to creating and maintaining a working and learning environment free from violence for its students and employees. Respect throughout the University for the dignity and rights of others is intrinsic to an environment free from violence.

The University has a zero tolerance for violence against members of the University community. The University prohibits acts of unlawful violence or threats or unlawful violence. The University may seek injunctive relief in the event of violence or threats of violence against any individual in and on the University community or campus facility.

Existing California State University disciplinary, grievance, or other complaint procedures, as appropriate, may serve as the mechanism for resolving acts of violence or threats of violence. Each allegation of an act of violence or a threat of violence will be taken seriously. Where there is reason to believe that University regulations prohibiting violence have been broken, the University may purse disciplinary action. Such Disciplinary action could include demotion, suspension, or expulsion from the University for students.

Appendix F Admission Procedures and Policies

F-1. Importance of Filing Complete, Accurate and Authentic Application Documents

CSUN advises prospective students that they must supply complete and accurate information on the application for admission, residence questionnaire, and financial aid forms. Further, applicants must, when requested, submit authentic and official transcripts of all previous academic work attempted. Failure to file complete, accurate, and authentic application documents may result in denial of admission, cancellation of registration or academic credit, suspension, or expulsion (Section 41301, Article 1.1, Title 5, California Code of Regulations).

F-2. Undergraduate Application Procedures

Prospective students applying for part-time or full-time undergraduate programs of study in day or evening classes must file a complete undergraduate application. The $55 nonrefundable application fee should be in the form of a check or money order payable to “The California State University” or by credit card and may not be transferred or used to apply to another term. An alternate major may be indicated on the application. The applications of persons denied admission to an impacted and/or closed campus may be re-routed to another campus at no cost, but only if the applicant is CSU eligible.

F-3. Foreign Language Subject Requirement

The foreign language subject requirement may be satisfied by applicants who demonstrate competence in a language other than English equivalent to or higher than expected of students who complete two years of foreign language study. Consult with your school counselor or any CSU campus admission or relations with schools office for further information.

F-4. Subject Requirement Substitution for Students with Disabilities

Applicants with disabilities are strongly encouraged to complete college preparatory course requirements if at all possible. If an applicant is judged unable to fulfill a specific course requirement because of his or her disability, alternative college preparatory courses may be substituted for specific subject requirements. Substitutions may be authorized on an individual basis after review and recommendation by the applicant’s academic advisor or guidance counselor in consultation with the director of a CSU disabled student services program. Although the distribution may be slightly different from the course pattern required of other students, students qualifying for substitutions will still be held for 15 units of college preparatory study. Students should be aware that course substitutions may limit later enrollment in certain majors, particularly those involving mathematics. For further information and substitution forms, please call the director of disabled student services at your nearest CSU campus.

F-5. Other Undergraduate Applicants

Applicants not admissible under the established provisions should enroll in a community college or other appropriate institution. Only under the most unusual circumstances will such applicants be permitted to enroll. Permission is granted only by special action.

F-6. Graduate and Post-Baccalaureate Admission Requirements

All graduate and post-baccalaureate applicants (e.g., joint PhD and EdD applicants, master’s degree applicants, those seeking educational credentials, and holders of baccalaureate degrees interested in taking courses for personal or professional growth) must file a complete graduate application as described in the graduate and post-baccalaureate admission materials at www.csumentor.edu. Applicants seeking a second bachelor’s degree should submit the undergraduate application for admission unless specifically requested to do otherwise. Applicants who completed undergraduate degree requirements and graduated the preceding term are also required to complete and submit an application and the $55 nonrefundable application fee. Since applicants for post-baccalaureate programs may be limited to the choice of a single campus on each application, re-routing to alternate campuses or later changes of campus choice are not guaranteed. To be assured of initial consideration by more than one campus, it is necessary to submit separate applications (including fees) to each. Applications submitted by way of www.csumentor.edu are preferable. An electronic version of the CSU graduate application is available onThe CSUMentor Website.

F-7. Admission to Graduate Study with CSUN Bachelor’s Degree

California State University, Northridge Bachelor’s degree graduates who plan to continue enrollment at California State University, Northridge the semester following their graduation must submit the appropriate application forms to the Office of Admissions and Records during the final semester of their undergraduate work. Determination of eligibility to continue in graduate enrollment is made by the major department and/or the Credentials Office in conjunction with the Office of Graduate Studies.

F-8. Impacted Programs

The CSU designates programs as impacted when more applications from CSU regularly eligible students are received in the initial filing period (October and November for fall terms, June for winter terms, August for spring terms, February for summer terms) than can be accommodated. Some programs are impacted at every campus where they are offered; others are impacted only at some campuses. Candidates for admission must meet supplementary admission criteria if applying to an impacted program.

The CSU will announce during the fall filing period those programs that are impacted and the supplementary criteria campuses will use. Detailed impaction information is available at The California State University’s Website and via The CSUMentor Website. That announcement will also be published in the CSU Review distributed to high school and college counselors, and made available online at The California State University Website. Information about the supplementary criteria is also provided to program applicants.

Applicants must file applications for admission to an impacted program during the initial filing period. Applicants who wish to be considered in impacted programs at more than one campus should file an application at each campus for which they seek admissions consideration.

Supplementary Admission Criteria

Each campus with impacted programs uses supplementary admission criteria in screening applicants. Supplementary criteria may include rank–ordering of freshman applicants based on the CSU eligibility index or rank-ordering of transfer applicants based on the overall transfer grade point average, completion of specified prerequisite courses, and a combination of campus-developed criteria. Applicants for freshman admission to impacted campuses or programs are required to submit scores on either the SAT or the ACT. For fall admission, applicants should take tests as early as possible and no later than October of the preceding year.

The supplementary admission criteria used by the individual campuses to screen applicants appear periodically in the CSU Review and are made available by the campuses to all applicants seeking admission to an impacted program. Details regarding the supplemental admissions criteria are also provided at The California State University’s Website.

F-9. Hardship Petitions

The campus has established procedures for consideration of qualified applicants who would be faced with extreme hardship if not admitted. Petitioners should contact the office of Admissions and Records regarding specific policies governing hardship admission.

F-10. Determination of Residence for Nonresident Tuition Purposes

University requirements for establishing residency are independent from those of other types of residency, such as for tax purposes, or other state or institutional residency. These regulations were promulgated not to determine whether a student is a resident or nonresident of California, but rather to determine whether a student should pay University fees on an in-state or out-of-state basis. A resident for tuition purposes is someone who meets the requirements set forth in the Uniform Student Residence Requirements. These laws governing residence for tuition purposes at the California State University are California Education Code sections 68000-68090, 68120-68134, and 89705-89707.5, and California Code of Regulations, Title 5, Subchapter 5, Article 4, sections 41900-41916. This material can be viewed on the Internet by accessing The California State University’s Website.

Each campus’s Admissions Office is responsible for determining the residence status of all new and returning students based on the Application for Admission, Residency Questionnaire, Reclassification Request Form, and, as necessary, other evidence furnished by the student. A student who fails to submit adequate information to establish eligibility for resident classification will be classified as a nonresident.

Generally, establishing California residence for tuition purposes requires a combination of physical presence and intent to remain indefinitely. An adult who, at least one full year prior to the residence determination date for the term in which enrollment is contemplated, can demonstrate both physical presence in the state combined with evidence of intent to remain in California indefinitely may establish California residence for tuition purposes. A minor normally derives residence from the parent(s) they reside with or most recently resided with.

Evidence demonstrating intent may vary from case to case but will include, and is not limited to, the absence of residential ties to any other state, California voter registration and voting in California elections, maintaining California vehicle registration and driver’s license, maintaining active California bank accounts, filing California income tax returns and listing a California address on federal tax returns, owning residential property or occupying or renting an apartment where permanent belongings are kept, maintaining active memberships in California professional or social organizations, and maintaining a permanent military address and home of record in California.

Nonresident students seeking reclassification are required to complete a supplemental questionnaire that includes questions concerning their financial dependence on parents or others who do not meet University requirements for classification as residents for tuition purposes. Financial independence is required, along with physical presence and intent, to be eligible for reclassification.

Non-citizens establish residence in the same manner as citizens, unless precluded by the Immigration and Nationality Act from establishing domicile in the United States.

Exceptions to the general residence requirements are contained in California Education Code sections 68070-68084 and California Code of Regulations, Title 5, Subchapter 5, Article 4, sections 41906-41906.5, and include, but are not limited to, members of the military and their dependents, certain credentialed employees of school districts and most students who have attended three years of high school in California and graduated or attained the equivalent. Whether an exception applies to a particular student cannot be determined before the submission of an application for admission and, as necessary, additional supporting documentation. Because neither campus nor Chancellor’s Office staff may give advice on the application of these laws, applicants are strongly urged to review the material for themselves and consult with a legal advisor.

Residence determination dates are set each term. They are:

Quarter Term Campuses Semester Term Campuses
Fall September 20 Fall September 20
Winter January 5 Winter *January 5
Spring April 1 Spring January 25
Summer July 1 Summer June 1

* Applies only to winter term at California State University, Stanislaus.

The residence determination dates for the four stages of CalStateTEACH are as follows:

Stage 1 September 20
Stage 2 January 5
Stage 3 June 1
Stage 4 September 20

Students classified as non-residents may appeal a final campus decision within 120 days of notification by the campus. A campus residence classification appeal must be in writing and submitted to:

  • The California State University
  • Office of General Counsel
  • 401 Golden Shore, 4th Floor
  • Long Beach, CA 90802-4210

The Office of General Counsel can either decide the appeal or send the matter back to the campus for further review. Students incorrectly classified as residents or incorrectly granted an exception from nonresident tuition are subject to reclassification as nonresidents and payment of nonresident tuition in arrears. If incorrect classification results from false or concealed facts, the student is also subject to discipline pursuant to Section 41301 of Title 5 of the California Code of Regulations.

Resident students who become nonresidents or who no longer meet the criteria for an exception must immediately notify the Admissions Office. Changes may have been made in the rate of nonresident tuition and in the statutes and regulations governing residence for tuition purposes in California between the time this information is published and the relevant residence determination date. Students are urged to review the statutes and regulations stated above.

F-11. Average Support Cost Per Full-time Equivalent Student and Sources of Funds

The total support cost per full-time equivalent student (FTES) includes the expenditures for current operations, including payments made to students in the form of financial aid, and all fully reimbursed programs contained in state appropriations. The average support cost is determined by dividing the total cost by the number of full-time equivalent students. The total CSU 2009/10 final budget amounts were $2,337,952,000 from state General Fund appropriations (not including capital outlay funding), $1,593,422,000 from State University Fee (SUF) revenue, $300,342,000 from other fee revenues and reimbursements for a total of $4,231,716,000. The number of projected 2009/10 full-time equivalent students (FTES) is 357,403. The number of full-time equivalent students is determined by dividing the total academic student load by 15 units per term (the figure used here to define a full-time student’s academic load).

The 2009/10 average support cost per full-time equivalent student based on General Fund appropriation and State University Fee revenue only is $11,000 and when including all sources as indicated below is $11,840. Of this amount, the average student fee support per FTES is $5,298, which includes all fee revenue in the CSU Operating Fund (e.g. State University Fee, nonresident tuition, application fees, and other miscellaneous fees).

2009/10 Amount Average Cost per FTE Student Percentage
Total Support Cost $4,231,716,000 $11,840 100%
State Appropriation 2,337,952,000 6,542 55%
Student Fee Support1 1,593,422,000 4,458 38%
Other Income & Reimbursements2 300,342,000 840 7%

1Student fee support represents campus 2009/10 final budget submitted State University Fee revenue.

2The other income and reimbursements represent campus other fee 2009/10 final budget revenues submitted, as well as reimbursements in the CSU Operating Fund.

The average CSU 2009/10 academic year, resident, undergraduate student fees required to apply to, enroll in, or attend the university is $4,893. However, the costs paid by individual students will vary depending on campus, program, and whether a student is part-time, full-time, resident, or nonresident.

F-12. International (Foreign) Student Admission Requirements

Undegraduate/Graduate

The CSU must assess the academic preparation of foreign students. For this purpose, “foreign students” include those who hold U.S. temporary visas as students, exchange visitors, or in other nonimmigrant classifications.

The CSU uses separate requirements and application filing dates in the admission of “foreign students.” Verification of English proficiency (see the section on TOEFL Requirement for undergraduate applicants), financial resources, and academic performance are each important considerations for admission. Academic records from foreign institutions must be on file at least [insert campus deadline for document submission] for the first term and, if not in English, must be accompanied by certified English translations.

Priority in admission is given to residents of California. There is often little likelihood of nonresident applicants, including international students, being admitted either to impacted majors or to those majors or programs with limited openings.

Application Forms and deadlines:The University has established deadlines to insure the timely processing of all application materials, receipt of academic records, test scores, financial affidavit, and other documents so that there will be adequate time for the admitted applicant to make the necessary passport, visa, and travel arrangements to reach the U.S. and the campus prior to the start of each semester.

Each applicant must have a declared educational objective (major) when the application is filed. This sentence needs to be removed because applications are online and they won’t be returned: Applications received that do not indicate a major, one that is not offered at this University, or one that is closed will be returned without action. All official documents submitted become the property of the University and cannot be returned. The acceptability of any foreign work will be determined by the University. The U.S. Immigration Service requires F-1 foreign visa students to enroll full-time, defined as a minimum of 12 semester units for undergraduate students, and 8 semester units for graduate students. International students must comply with all University and U.S. Immigration Service regulations.

Academic Records, International Students


Undergraduate Applicants: Either original documents or certified photocopies of original documents of previous international school records are acceptable. Transfer students from U.S. institutions should request that official transcripts be mailed directly to the Admissions Office. Students with foreign academic work are required to submit official copies of academic records, along with a certified English translation. Academic records should include:

  1. secondary school records;
  2. yearly records from each college or university attended, indicating the number of hours per semester or per year devoted to each course and the grades received;
  3. official documents that confirm awarding of the degree with the title and date. The Office of Admissions and Records will examine all records to determine if they are adequate and will inform applicants if additional records are required.

The evaluation of all documents is made in the Office of Admissions and Records to determine that applicants have had an education comparable to that required of California high school graduates or students transferring to the University from other institutions of higher education in the United States.

Graduate/Postbaccalaureate Applicants: Postbaccalaureate or graduate applicants must furnish the same materials as those required of undergraduate applicants described above. Admission of foreign graduate students will involve consultation with the graduate advisor from the department or school to which the student is applying for study. Scholastically eligible foreign graduate students may be admitted, dependent upon the preparation of the student as assessed by the Office of Admissions and the graduate advisor of the appropriate school or department. For further information, consult the Office of Admissions and Records. See also the Graduate Programs section of the catalog.

English Language Proficiency: Undergraduate International Applicants All undergraduate applicants, regardless of citizenship, whose preparatory education was principally in a language other than English must demonstrate competence in English. Those who have not attended, for at least three years full-time, schools at the secondary level or above in a country where English is the principal language of instruction, must earn a minimum score of 61 on the internet based Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Applicants taking the Computer Based Test of English as a Foreign Language must present a score of 173 or above.

Graduate and Postbaccalaureate International Applicants: All graduate and postbaccalaureate applicants, regardless of citizenship, whose preparatory education was principally in a language other than English must demonstrate competence in English. Those who do not possess a bachelor’s degree from a postsecondary institution in a country where English is the principal language of instruction must receive a minimum score of 79/80 on the internet based Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or a minimum score of 6.0 on the International English Language Testing System (IELTS.) Applicants taking the Computer Based Test of English as a Foreign Language must present a score of 213 or above. Some departments require a higher score for admission.

Finances, International Students: CSUN has no financial aid for international students. For this reason foreign students must detail precisely how they intend to finance their studies. If an applicant expects to receive financial support from his/her government or other sponsoring agencies, he/she is required to fully document these facts by completing the Financial Statement and Affidavit available online at The Admissions and Records Website

Part-time employment opportunities, although not plentiful, are available on campus. International visa students may apply for an on-campus work permit in the Office of International and Exchange Programs after their first semester of study. Immigration and Naturalization regulations prohibit off-campus employment of International students in the United States without explicit permission.

The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (P.L. 104-193), also known as the Welfare Reform Act, includes provisions to eliminate eligibility for federal and state public benefits for certain categories of lawful immigrants as well as benefits for all illegal immigrants.

F-13. Immigration Requirements for Licensure

Students who will require a professional or commercial license provided by a local, state, or federal government agency in order to engage in an occupation for which the CSU may be training them must meet the immigration requirements of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act to achieve licensure. Information concerning the regulation these requirements are available from International Programs Office.

F-14. Reservation

The University reserves the right to select its students and deny admission to the University or any of its programs as the University, in its sole discretion, determines appropriate based on an applicant’s suitability and the best interests of the University.

F-15. Systemwide Placement Test Requirements: ELM and EPT

The California State University requires that each entering undergraduate, except those who qualify for an exemption, take the CSU Entry Level Mathematics (ELM) examination and the CSU English Placement Test (EPT) prior to enrollment. Undergraduate students who do not demonstrate college-level skills both in English and in mathematics will be placed in appropriate remedial programs and activities during the first term of their enrollment.

If your ELM score is 32 or below you will be required to take two (2) developmental mathematics courses at CSUN. If your score is above 32 but below 50, you will be required to take one (1) developmental mathematics course at CSUN.

An EPT score of 141 or below places the student in 097: Developmental Reading. A score of 142-150 is required for enrollment in 098: Developmental Writing. A score of 151 and above qualifies the student for enrollment in 155, the Freshman Composition courses for Asian American Studies, Chicana and Chicano Studies, English, and Pan African Studies.

F-16. Upper-Division Writing Proficiency Exam (UDWPE)


All students must demonstrate competency in writing skills as a requirement for graduation. Information on currently available ways to meet this graduation requirement may be obtained from The CSUN Website. At CSUN, all students who have met the lower division writing requirements, completed 56 units or more, and intend to graduate with the baccalaureate or masters degree are required to pass an essay examination as a demonstration of their proficiency in writing. Undergraduate students are advised to take the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam no later than the semester in which 90 units are completed to avoid delaying their graduation. A non-refundable $20.00 fee will be assessed. Students should bring their registration card and two picture identifications (driver’s license, state ID card or passport to the test site. Scores are posted on Student Center—SOLAR four to six weeks following the exam.

A new Upper Division Writing Proficiency Examination (UDWPE) policy was passed by the Faculty Senate and approved by President Jolene Koester on December 15, 2010. This policy is effective Fall 2011.

Download the revised exam policy(.pdf)

For test dates and registration information, visit the Testing Center website at http://www.csun.edu/testing/upper/. You can contact the Testing Center at (818) 677-2369.

F-17. Mathematics Placement Test (MPT)

The Mathematics Placement Test (MPT) is a CSUN test which is used to determine eligibility for enrollment in MATH 103, 104, 105, 150A and 255A and must have been taken within the year preceding enrollment in these courses. The MPT does not replace the ELM requirement, but is used in addition to the ELM to determine eligibility for enrollment.

Part I of the MPT consists of questions on intermediate algebra. Part II of the MPT consists of questions on trigonometry and advanced topics from intermediate algebra (precalculus). A qualifying score on Part I is required for entry into MATH 103, 104, and 105. (Note: Students seeking to enter Math 103 who do not make the qualifying score can enroll in the class IF they concurrently enroll in Math 103L.) Qualifying scores on both Parts I and II are required for entry into MATH 150A and 255A.

You must register online for the Mathematics Placement Test at least one week prior to the test date. Visit the Placement Test Website to find current test dates, test fee, and information on how to register for the test. The website also provides information on the type of payment that is accepted, identification required, other regulations that must be followed for the test, the qualifying scores required for specific CSUN Math classes, and how to obtain your scores. A student may test only once in a 6 month period

Students are advised to Visit the Mathematics Diagnositic Placement Test Website and take the free on-line sample tests to help prepare for CSUN MPT. The MR test is similar to MPT Part I and the CR test is similar to the MPT Part II.

F-18. Chemistry Placement Test (CPT)

Students planning to enroll in CHEM 101/101L must satisfy one of the following requirements prior to registration:

  • Satisfactory score of 40 or higher on the CSUN Chemistry Placement Test (CPT)
  • Score of 3, 4 or 5 on the College Board Advanced Placement Test in Chemistry
  • Grade of “C” or higher (“C-” is unacceptable) in CHEM 100* taken at CSUN

*Successful completion of the ELM requirement is a prerequisite for enrollment in CHEM 100.

The Chemistry Placement Test (CPT) covers high school chemistry and applied algebra. Students who fail the CPT may enroll in CHEM 101/101L after completing CHEM 100 at CSUN with a grade of “C” or higher (“C-” is unacceptable) or after retaking the CPT with a satisfactory score.

You must register online for the Chemistry Placement Test at least one week prior to the test date. Visit the Placement Test Website to find current test dates, test fee, and information on how to register for the test. The website also provides information on the type of payment that is accepted, identification required, other regulations that must be followed for the test, and how to obtain your scores. A student may test only once in a 6 month period.

F-19. Health Screening

Entering CSU students are required to present proof of the following immunizations to the CSU campus they will be attending before the beginning of their first term of enrollment. Measles and Rubella: All new and readmitted students born after January 1, 1957 must provide proof of full immunization against measles and rubella prior to enrollment. Hepatitis B: All new students who will be 18 years of age or younger at the start of their first term at a CSU campus must provide proof of full immunization against Hepatitis B before enrolling. Full immunization against Hepatitis B consists of three timed doses of vaccine over a minimum 4 to 6 months period. If you need further details or have special circumstances, please consult the Student Health Center. Each incoming freshman who will be residing in on-campus housing will be required to return a form indicating that they have received information about meningococcal disease and the availability of the vaccine to prevent contracting the disease and indicating whether or not the student has chosen to receive the vaccination. These are not admission requirements, but are required of students as conditions of enrollment in CSU.

F-20. Degree Progress Report (DPR)

The Office of Admissions and Records evaluates previous college work in relation to degree requirements at CSU Northridge. Entering transfer students who have submitted ALL final official transcripts and test scores are issued a DPR. The DPR Report indicates how incoming transferable coursework completes the baccalaureate degree requirements at the University. The DPR Report also displays remaining requirements needed for completion of the degree based on the students major at entrance. Students can expect to receive several DPR Reports during their stay at the University which will track their progress toward graduation. The DPR Report will convert quarter units of credit transferred to the University to semester units by multiplying quarter-unit totals by two-thirds. Students should consult a faculty advisor in their major department who will assist them in the selection of courses. Students who have yet to declare a major should seek advisement in the Advising Resource Center/EOP.

F-21. Credit for Work Taken at Community Colleges

Credit earned in accredited community colleges will be evaluated by the Office of Admissions and Records in accordance with the following provisions:

  1. Community college credit is allowed up to a maximum of 70 semester units. Credits and grades earned after the student has the maximum allowable may only satisfy subject and grade point requirements but cannot apply toward the total units required for graduation from the University.
  2. No upper division credit may be earned for community college work.
  3. No credit may be allowed for professional courses in education taken in a community college, other than an introduction to education course.

The University publishes a series of articulation agreements with local California community colleges outlining how coursework at the community college applies to CSUN requirements, both in the major and in General Education. These are available on-line at the ASSIST web site at www.assist.org. ASSIST is the official repository of articulation for California’s public colleges and universities.

Students who transfer to CSUN from a California community college may have up to 39 semester units of their General Education program certified. Such certification will be recognized within the limits published by the Chancellor of the CSU. General Education Certified students need to complete General Education residence and upper division General Education requirements (see Undergraduate Programs, General Education).

Transfer students from the California community colleges are urged to consult their community college counselors for assistance in determining the extent to which they meet that college’s General Education certification program and should send a final transcript to CSUN showing Certification. That Certification will then be reflected on the DPR Audit.

F-22. Credit/No Credit Work

A maximum of 18 semester units with restrictions may be applied toward the bachelor’s degree for CSUN “Credit’’ graded courses. If 18 or more semester “Credit’’ graded units are accepted in transfer from other institutions, no additional “Credit’’ graded CSUN courses may be used to satisfy degree requirements.

F-23. CSU English Equivalency Examination

The English Equivalency Examination is an examination that has been offered by the CSU system. It was administered each spring on various campuses to prospective freshmen. Students who passed both the objective and essay portions of the examination were exempted from the English Placement Test (EPT), and granted six semester units of University credit equivalent to English 155 and 255. Some students did not receive unit credit for the English Equivalency Examination, but scored well enough to be exempted from the English Placement Test.

F-24. Restrictions on Exam Credit

No credit for any of the foregoing examinations will be awarded to a student who has:

  1. taken the examination previously within the past term;
  2. earned equivalent credit through regular coursework, credit by another examination, or other instructional processes, such as correspondence;
  3. earned credit previously at a level more advanced than that represented by the examination in question.

Credit will not be awarded for examinations which overlap other examinations or college level courses. Where partial overlap exists, the amount of examination credit shall be reduced accordingly.

The total amount of credit earned on the basis of externally developed tests which may be applied to a baccalaureate degree cannot exceed 30 semester units, exclusive of credit for Advanced Placement Examinations. In no case will credit so awarded count toward residence credit.

F-25. Other Credit

Credit for Extension and Correspondence Courses

The maximum amount of credit through correspondence courses and/or extension courses which may be allowed toward the bachelor’s degree is 24 units. Extension course credit does not apply toward the residence requirement at California State University, Northridge. Extension courses numbered 800 do not carry any credit toward CSUN graduation or credential requirements.

Extension courses from other accredited educational institutions must have been acceptable for credit at the parent institution for the baccalaureate degree. The nature of the credit for the degree at CSUN shall be determined by the appropriate academic departments.

Credit for Prior Learning: Credit for Prior Experiential Learning is recognized on an individual course equivalency basis at CSUN, and appropriate credit provided through the departmentally administered Credit by Challenge Examination policies and procedures (Students should be aware, however, that policies for earning credit for prior learning vary from campus to campus in the CSU.)

Non-Collegiate Sponsored Courses of Instruction: CSUN grants undergraduate degree credit for successful completion of noncollegiate instruction, either military or civilian, appropriate to the baccalaureate degree, which has been recommended by the Commission on Educational Credit and Credentials of the American Council on Education. The number of units allowed are those recommended in the Guide to the Evaluation of Educational Experience in the Armed Services and the National Guide to Educational Credit for Training Programs.

Credit for Military Service: CSUN grants elective undergraduate credit to veterans who have completed basic training in the armed forces of the United States. A maximum of 24 extension course units may be allowed for baccalaureate-level course credit certified by the Defense Activities in Nontraditional Education Support (DANTES). Courses taken in service schools may be given credit on the basis of an evaluation which determines they are of university level and recommended for credit by the Center for Adult Learning and Educational Credentials of the American Council on Education. Records verifying such experience must be filed with the Office of Admissions and Records.

F-26. Availability of Institutional and Financial Assistance Information

The following information concerning student financial assistance may be obtained from Financial Aid Office:

  1. A description of the federal, state, institutional, local, and private student financial assistance programs available to students who enroll at CSUN;
  2. For each aid program, a description of procedures and forms by which students apply for assistance, student eligibility requirements, criteria for selecting recipients from the group of eligible applicants, and criteria for determining the amount of a student’s award;
  3. A description of the rights and responsibilities of students receiving financial assistance, including federal Title IV student assistance programs, and criteria for continued student eligibility under each program;
  4. The satisfactory academic progress standards that students must maintain for the purpose of receiving financial assistance and criteria by which a student who has failed to maintain satisfactory progress may reestablish eligibility for financial assistance;
  5. The method by which financial assistance disbursements will be made to students and the frequency of those disbursements;
  6. The terms of any loan received as part of the student’s financial aid package, a sample loan repayment schedule, and the necessity for repaying loans;
  7. The general conditions and terms applicable to any employment provided as part of the student’s financial aid package;
  8. The responsibility of CSUN for providing and collecting exit counseling information for all student borrowers under the federal student loan programs; and
  9. The terms and conditions for deferral of loan payments for qualifying service under the Peace Corps Act, the Domestic Volunteer Service Act of 1973, or comparable volunteer community service.

Information concerning the cost of attending CSUN is available from (818) 677-8000, Option 2, and includes fees and tuition (where applicable); the estimated costs of books and supplies; estimates of typical student room, board, and transportation costs; and, if requested, additional costs for specific programs.

Information concerning the refund policies of CSUN for the return of unearned tuition and fees or other refundable portions of institutional charges is available from Financial Aid Office (818) 677-3000. Information concerning policies regarding the return of federal Title IV student assistance funds as required by regulation is available from the Financial Aid Office.

Information regarding special facilities and services available to students with disabilities may be obtained from Students with Disabilities Resources, Bayramian Hall (BH) 110,(818) 677-2684.

Information concerning CSUN policies, procedures, and facilities for students and other to report criminal actions or other emergencies occurring on campus may be obtained from the Department of Public Safety, (818) 677-2211.

Information concerning CSUN annual campus security report may be obtained from the Department of Public Safety, (818) 677-221. Information concerning the prevention of drug and alcohol abuse and rehabilitation programs may be obtained from Klotz Student Health Center, (818) 677-3693.

Information regarding student retention and graduation rates at CSUN and, if available, the number and percentage of students completing the program in which the student is enrolled or has expressed interest may be obtained from the Office of Institutional Research,(818) 677-3277.

Information concerning athletic opportunities available to male and female students and the financial resources and personnel that CSUN dedicates to its men’s and women’s teams may be obtained from Office of Intercollegiate Athletics, (818) 677-3208. Information concerning teacher preparation programs at CSUN, including the pass rate on teacher certification examinations, may be obtained from the Michael D. Eisner College of Education, (818) 677-2594.

Information concerning grievance procedures for students who feel aggrieved in their relationships with the university, its policies, practices and procedures, or its faculty and staff may be obtained from the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs, (818) 677-2391.

The federal Military Selective Service Act (the “Act”) requires most males residing in the United States to present themselves for registration with the Selective Service System within thirty days of their eighteenth birthday. Most males between the ages of 18 and 25 must be registered. Males born after December 31, 1959, may be required to submit a statement of compliance with the Act and regulations in order to receive any grant, loan, or work assistance under specified provisions of existing federal law. In California, students subject to the Act who fail to register are also ineligible to receive any need-based student grants funded by the state or a public postsecondary institution.

Selective Service registration forms are available at any U.S. Post Office, and many high schools have a staff member or teacher appointed as a Selective Service Registrar. Applicants for financial aid can also request that information provided on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) be used to register them with the Selective Service. Information on the Selective Service System is available and the registration process may be initiated online at The Selective Service System Website.

Appendix G. University Regulations

G-1. Appeal of Undergraduate University Regulations

Undergraduate students seeking to appeal regulations other than course requirements in their major or minor should obtain the Undergraduate Petition online at the CSUN website or from Admissions and Records and return the completed form and required fee to Admissions and Records for review and consideration by appropriate campus officials. Seniors who have applied for graduation and are requesting substitution or waiver of requirements in their major or minor should discuss the possible Substitution or Waiver with their department chair. The chair will send the form to the student’s Graduation evaluator in Admissions and Records. Many regulations are not subject to appeal or amendment because of provisions of Title V of the California Code of Regulations. Examples of Regulations that are not subject to modification by the University include limitations on extension and community college credit and the C average required for graduation.

G-2. Changes in Rules and Policies

Although every effort has been made to assure the accuracy of the information in this catalog, students and others who use this catalog should note that laws, rules, and policies change from time to time and that these changes may alter the information contained in this publication. Changes may come in the form of statutes enacted by the Legislature, rules and policies adopted by the Board of Trustees of the California State University, by the Chancellor or designee of the California State University, or by the President or designee of the campus. It is not possible in a publication of this size to include all of the rules, policies and other information that pertain to students, the institution, and the California State University. More current or complete information may be obtained from the appropriate department, school, or administrative office.

Nothing in this catalog shall be construed as, operate as, or has the effect of an abridgment or a limitation of any rights, powers, or privileges of the Board of Trustees of the California State University, the Chancellor of the California State University, or the President of the campus. The Trustees, the Chancellor, and the President are authorized by law to adopt, amend, or repeal rules and policies that apply to students. This catalog does not constitute a contract or the terms and conditions of a contract between the student and the institution or the California State University. The relationship of the student to the institution is one governed by statute, rules, and policy adopted by the Legislature, the Trustees, the Chancellor, the President and their duly authorized designees.

G-3. Catalog Production

The University Catalog is prepared by the Office of Undergraduate Studies. This Catalog is available at the University Library for reference, at the Matador Bookstore for purchase, and can also be viewed online at The CSUN Catalog Website.

Catalog Editor Gregory Mena
Editorial Assistant Theresa Shreffler
Graphic Design Ashley Mullen
Campus Map Randal S. Thomson

Additional photographs appear courtesy of the Office of Public Relations.

Appendix H. Other Policies

H-1. Second Bachelor’s Degree

A post baccalaureate student who holds a recognized bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution may pursue a program leading to a second bachelor’s degree in approved majors. The major may not be the same as the previously awarded degree. All students are urged to consult with a department advisor to determine whether a second bachelor’s or a graduate program better meets their needs.CSUN Graduates Must:

  1. Complete a minimum of 24 Upper-Division units in residence at CSUN since completion of the most recent degree, of which at least 12 units must be in the major. Completion of the major may require more than 12 units;
  2. Complete the Upper-Division Writing Proficiency requirement;
  3. Complete all units required in the major. Graduate level courses (500-600) may not be applied toward second bachelor’s degree requirements, nor can coursework taken to meet the second bachelor’s degree apply toward a master’s degree;
  4. Maintain a minimum grade-point average of 2.0 in the major and 2.0 in all units attempted at CSUN since the awarding of the last degree;
  5. File an undergraduate application for graduation and diploma.

Transfer Graduates Seeking Second Bachelor’s Degree at CSUN:

Students seeking a second bachelor’s degree from CSUN, after having received a baccalaureate degree from another accredited institution, must:

  1. Complete at least 30 units in residence at CSUN since completion of the first bachelor’s degree, including 24 Upper-Division units and at least 12 units in the major. Completion of the major may require more than 12 units;
  2. Complete the California State University General Education requirements, by taking 9 Upper-Division GE units in residence, but are not required to complete the Information Competence requirements, or the approved equivalent. NOTE: Second bachelor’s students who have received their first degree at another CSU campus and second bachelor’s students in the Nursing and Health Science [Radiologic Technology] do not need to complete residence GE at Cal State Northridge;
  3. Complete the Title 5 requirements in American History, Institutions and Ideals; U.S. Constitution, and California State and Local Government, selecting upper division HIST 370, 371, AAS 347, CH S 445, or POLS 355 will also fulfill units of Upper Division Residence GE requirements;
  4. Complete the Upper-Division Writing Proficiency requirement;
  5. Complete all units required in the major. Graduate level courses (500-600) may not be applied toward second bachelor degree requirements, nor can coursework taken to meet the second bachelor’s degree apply toward a master’s degree;
  6. Maintain a minimum grade-point average of 2.0 in the major and 2.0 in all units attempted at CSUN since the awarding of the last degree;
  7. File an undergraduate application for graduation and diploma

H-2. International Baccalaureate (IB)

International Baccalaureate (IB) courses designated as honors courses on the UC “a-g” list are awarded extra grade points for computation of the high school grade point average. To be awarded advanced standing credit for successful performance the IB test must be higher level (HL) and have a score of 4 or higher. IB tests with standard level (SL) or any other designator are not acceptable as college level. Transcripts, certificates or diplomas with IB test results should be turned in to Admissions and Records. See H-8 in the Appendices for IB exam credit table (page 628).

H-3. Academic Renewal

The Trustees of The California State University have established a program of Academic Renewal whereby students who are having difficulty meeting graduation requirements due to a grade point deficiency may petition to have up to 2 semesters or 3 quarters of previous college work discounted from all considerations associated with meeting requirements for the baccalaureate degree. Academic Renewal is intended only to facilitate graduation from CSUN and is not applicable for individuals who already possess a baccalaureate degree or who meet graduation requirements without the approval of a petition for Academic Renewal.

Conditions: In order to qualify for Academic Renewal all of the following conditions established by the Trustees must be met:

  1. Students must present evidence in the petition that the coursework to be disregarded was substandard and not representative of the their present scholastic ability and level of performance, due to extenuating circumstances.
  2. Students must present evidence that if the petition is denied, it would be necessary for them to enroll in additional coursework involving one or more additional terms in order to qualify for graduation. Students should include the specific coursework or requirements involved. Normally, students should have completed 90 units prior to filing the petition.
  3. Five years must have elapsed since the term or terms to be disregarded were completed. Terms taken at any institution may be disregarded.
  4. Since completion of the term(s) to be disregarded, students must have completed coursework at CSUN with at least one of the following:
  1. 15 semester units with at least a 3.00 GPA.
  2. 30 semester units with at least a 2.50 GPA.
  3. 45 semester units with at least a 2.00 GPA.

If and when the petition is granted, the student’s permanent academic record will be annotated so that it is readily evident to all users of the record that no work taken during the disregarded term(s), even if satisfactory, will apply toward baccalaureate graduation requirements. However, all work will remain legible on the record to insure a true and complete academic history.

A final decision on the petition will be made by the Academic Renewal Review Committee. The committee will review petitions only if all of the basic requirements (indicated above) have been met. Normally, students will be notified of the decision within 60 days after the completed petition is submitted.

Petition Procedures: Students must take the following steps to petition for Academic Renewal:

  1. obtain departmental approval on the Application for Graduation and Diploma, available at the Student Information Center, for a precise evaluation of graduation requirements;
  2. obtain an Undergraduate Petition form, available at the Student Information Center;
  3. complete the petition, indicating the specific terms which they are requesting be discounted. In the “reason” section of the petition students must make a specific statement concerning each of the four conditions listed above.

H-4. Student Outcomes Assessment Policy

Students may be included in outcomes assessment projects. Among the types of assessment methods that might be used are portfolios, capstone seminars, certification examinations, senior papers, juried performances, productions, recitals and art shows, research projects, or supervised field experiences. Departments may have other assessment projects of this kind that are unique to their particular subject(s).

  • The project must have curricular value and must be meaningful in the context of the major.
  • Preferably, the project will be adapted from or included in an existing program requirement or course.
  • Students will have a high stake in the outcome of the project which can be, at the initiative of the department and, if necessary, at the approval of the Educational Policies Committee, a graduation requirement or part of a required course.
  • The project will evaluate competence in the major and relevant basic skills.
  • To the extent feasible, the project should be organized to give programs and the University visibility in the community and professional world. Therefore, departments and programs are encouraged to actively seek sources outside of the University, including alumni and employees, for involvement in all stages of assessment.
  • Departments may develop assessment procedures under this draft policy until a formal assessment policy is in place.
  • Results of assessment activities should reflect on the program or department rather than on individual faculty.
  • Results of the assessment should be reported as part of the program review and should be considered in other curricular reform projects. They can be shared with the public through appropriate media.

H-5. Class Levels (Class Standing)

Undergraduate students are classified according to the number of units completed, calculated as follows:

Status Units Completed
Freshman 0-29
Sophomore 30-59
Junior 60-89
Senior 90+

H-6 Advanced Placement (AP) Credit

Advanced Placement (AP) Credit
Examination Score Semester Units Allowed CSUN Course Equivalent (Do not enroll in these classes) General Education Plan R, Application in GE or Title 5
Art: History 3,4,5 6 units Art 110 6 units in Arts and Humanities {NOT ART majors}
Art: Studio Drawing 3,4,5 3 units No Equivalency 3 units in Arts and Humanities {NOT ART majors)
Art: 2D Design Portfolio 3,4,5 3 units No Equivalency 3 units in Arts and Humanities [NOT ART majors]
Art: 3D Design Portfolio 3,4,5 3 units ART 141 3 units in Arts and Humanities {NOT ART majors}
Biology 3,4,5 6 units BIOL 106 and 107 6 units in Natural Sciences {107 NOT Biology mjrs}Does NOT meet laboratory requirement
Chemistry 3 6 units CHEM 100 3 units Natural Sciences [includes CHEM majors] Does not meet lab requirement
4,5 6 units CHEM 101/101L 5 units Natural Sciences with lab [includes CHEM majors]
Chinese 3,4,5 6 units CHIN 201 and 202 6 units Comparative Cultural Studies
Computer Science A1 3 6 units Consult Computer Science Chair 3 units in Lifelong Learning
Computer Science A 1 4,5 6 units COMP 110/110L 3 units in Lifelong Learning [includes COMP SCI majors]
Computer Science AB 1 3 6 units COMP 110/110L 3 units in Lifelong Learning [includes COMP SCI majors]
Computer Science AB 1 4,5 6 units COMP110/110L and 182/182L 3 units in Lifelong Learning [includes COMP SCI majors]
Economics,Macroeconomics 3,4,5 3 units ECON 161 3 units in Social Sciences [NOT ECON majors]
Economics, Microeconomics 3,4,5 3 units ECON 160 3 units in Social Sciences [NOT ECON majors]
English Language and Comp 3,4,5 6 units ENGL 155 3 units Basic Skills –Written Composition; exempt from EPT and Lower Division Writing Skills rqmt
English Literature and Comp 2 3,4,5 6 units ENGL 255 3 units Basic Skills Written Compositionand 3 units Arts and Humanities [includes ENGLISH mjrs]; Exempt from EPT and Lower Division Writing Skills
Environmental Science 3,4,5 4 units No equivalency 4 units in Natural Sciences, with Lab
European History 3,4,5 6 units HIST 150 and 151 6 units Arts and Humanities Science [NOT HIST majors]
French Language 3,4,5 6 units Consult MCLL 6 units Comparative Cultural Studies [includes FREN majors]
French Literature 3,4,5 6 units Consult MCLL 6 units Comparative Cultural Studies [includes FREN majors]
German Language 3,4,5 6 units Consult MCLL 6 units Comparative Cultural Studies [includes GERM majors]
Geography 3,4,5 3 units GEOG 107 3 units Social Sciences [includes Geography majors]
Italian Language & Culture 3,4,5 6 units Consult MCLL 6 units Comparative Cultural Studies
Japanese Language & Culture >3,4,5 >6 units JAPN 201 and 202 6 units Comparative Cultural Studies
Latin: Vergil 3,4,5 3 units Consult MCLL 3 units Comparative Cultural Studies
Latin: Literature 3,4,5 6 units Consult MCLL 3 units Comparative Cultural Studies
Government & Politics: United States 3,4,5 6 units Consult Political Science Chair 2 units Title 5 U.S. Constitution requirement. Take POLS 490CA to satsify California government requirement.
Government & Politics: Comparative 3,4,5 6 units POLS 156 3 units Social Sciences {NOT POL SCI majors}
Math: Calculus AB 3 3 3 units MATH 103 or Consult Math
Dept. if another course is required in major
3 units Basic Skills A.3; exempt from ELM exam
Math: Calculus AB 3 4,5 5 units MATH 150A 5 units Basic Skills A.3; exempt from ELM exam
Math: Calculus BC 3 3 6 units MATH 150A or Consult Math
Dept. if another course is required in major
5 units Basic Skills A.3; exempt from ELM exam
Math: Calculus BC 3 4,5 6 units MATH 150A and 150B 5 units Basic Skills A.3; exempt from ELM exam
Math: Calculus BC/ AB Subscore 3 3 3 units MATH 103 or Consult Math
Dept. if other course is required in major
3 units Basic Skills A.3; exempt from ELM exam
Math: Calculus BC/ AB Subscore 3 4,5 5 units MATH 150A 5 units Basic Skills A.3; exempt from ELM exam
Music: Theory 3,4,5 6 units No equivalency 6 units Arts & Humanities [includes MUSIC majors]
Physics B 4 3,4,5 8 units PHYS 100A/100AL and 100B/100BL 8 units Natural Sciences [includes PHYSICS majors]
Physics C: Mechanics 4 3,4,5 4 units PHYS 220A/220AL 4 units Natural Sciences [includes PHYSICS majors]
Physics C:Elec & Mag 4 3,4,5 4 units PHYS 220B/220BL 4 units Natural Sciences [includes PHYSICS majors]
Psychology 3,4,5 3 units PSY 150 3 units Social Sciences [includes PSYCH majors]
Spanish Language 3,4,5 6 units Consult MCLL 6 units Comparative Cultural Studies [includes SPAN Majors]
Spanish Literature 3,4,5 6 units Consult MCLL 6 units Comparative Cultural Studies [includes SPAN Majors]
Statistics 3,4,5 4 units MATH 140 4 units Basic Skills A3; exempt from ELM exam [includes MATH majors]
U.S. History 3,4,5 6 units HIST 270 and 271 3 units Title 5, U.S. History requirement [includes HISTORY majors for HIST 270 or 271]
World History 3,4,5 6 units HIST 110 and 111 6 units Social Sciences [Not HIST majors]
  1. Maximum of 6 units allowed for completion of both Computer Science A and Computer Science AB examinations.
  2. Students with credit for AP English Literature and Comp should NOT take ENGL 155 or equivalent course.
  3. Maximum of 10 units allowed for completion of both Mathematics Calculus AB and BC examinations.
  4. Maximum of 8 units allowed for completion of both Physics B and C examinations.

H-7 College Level Examination Program CLEP

CLEP Examination Score Credit CSUN Equivalent General Education Application
American Government 50 3 units Consult Political Science Chair 2 units Title 5 U.S. Constitution requirement Take POLS 490CA to satisfy California Govt req.
American Literature 50 3 units No Equivalency 3 units in Arts and Humanities
Analyzing and Interpreting Literature 50 3 units No Equivalency 3 units in Arts and Humanities
Biology 50 3 units BIOL 101 3 units in Natural Sciences Does not meet Lab requirement
Calculus 50 3 units No Equivalency 3 units in Basic Skills, Mathematics. Allows for exemption from Entry-Level Math (ELM) test.
Chemistry 50 3 units CHEM 100 3 units in Natural Sciences Does not meet Lab requirement
College Algebra 50 3 units No Equivalency 3 units in Basic Skills, Mathematics. Allows for exemption from Entry-Level Math (ELM) test.
College Algebra Trigonometry 50 3 units No Equivalency 3 units in Basic Skills, Mathematics. Allows for exemption from Entry-Level Math (ELM) test.
English Composition with Essay (exam discontinued July 2010) 50 3 units No Equivalency 3 units applied in Basic Skills, Written Composition. Allows for exemption from English Placement Test and lower division writing skills requirement.
English Literature 50 3 units No Equivalency 3 units in Arts and Humanities
Financial Accounting 50 3 units No Equivalency No GE Application
French Level I * 50 6 units FREN 101 4 units in Comparative Cultural Studies
French Level II * 59 12 units FREN 102 4 units in Comparative Cultural Studies
Freshman College Composition (exam discontinued July 2010) 50 3 units No Equivalency 3 units applied in Basic Skills, Written Composition. Allows for exemption from English Placement Test and lower division writing skills requirement.
German Level I * 50 6 units GERM 101 4 units in Comparative Cultural Studies
German Level II * 60 12 units GERM 102 4 units in Comparative Cultural Studies
History, United States I 50 3 units No Equivalency 3 units in Social Sciences OR Title 5, U.S. History
History, United States II 50 3 units No Equivalency 3 units in Social Sciences OR Title 5, U.S. History
Human Growth and Development 50 3 units PSY 200 3 units in Social Sciences
Humanities 50 3 units HUM 101 3 units in Arts and Humanities
Information Systems Computer Appls 50 3 units No Equivalency 3 units in Lifelong Learning
Introduction to Educational Psychology 50 3 units No Equivalency No GE Application
Introductory Business Law 50 3 units BLAW 108 3 units in Lifelong Learning
Introductory Psychology 50 3 units PSY 150 3 units in Social Sciences
Introductory Sociology 50 3 units No Equivalency 3 units in Social Sciences
Natural Sciences 50 3 units No Equivalency 3 units in Natural Sciences Does not meet Lab requirement
Pre-Calculus 50 3 units No Equivalency 3 units in Basic Skills. Allows for exemption from Entry-Level Math (ELM) test
Principles of Accounting 50 3 units No Equivalency No GE Application
Principles of Macroeconomics 50 3 units 3 units in Social Sciences [Not ECON majors] ECON 161
Principles of Management 50 3 units No Equivalency No GE Application
Principles of Marketing 50 3 units No Equivalency No GE Application
Principles of Microeconomics 50 3 units ECON 160 3 units in Social Sciences [Not ECON majors]
Spanish Level I * 50 6 units SPAN 101 4 units in Comparative Cultural Studies
Spanish Level II * 63 12 units SPAN 102 4 units in Comparative Cultural Studies
Trigonometry 50 3 units No Equivalency 3 units in Basic Skills, Mathematics. Allows for exemption from Entry-Level Math (ELM) test.
Western Civilization I 50 3 units No Equivalency 3 units in Arts and Humanities OR Social Sciences
Western Civilization II 50 3 units No Equivalency 3 units in Arts and Humanities OR Social Sciences

* If a student passes more than one CLEP test in the same language other than English (e.g., two exams in French), then only one examination may be applied to the baccalaureate. For each test in a language other than English, a passing score of 50 is considered “Level I” and earns six units of baccalaureate credit; the higher score listed for each test is considered “Level II” and earns additional units of credit.

H-8. International Baccalaureate (IB) Exam Credit

IB Exam Score Semester Units Allowed CSUN Course Equivalent General Education Plan R Application In GE or Title 5
Art/Design HL 4,5 6 units No equivalency 6 units GE Arts and Humanities
Biology HL 4,5 6 units No equivalency 6 units GE Natural Science with Lab
Business & Management HL 4,5 6 units No equivalency Elective (No GE Placement)
Chemistry HL 4,5 6 units No equivalency 6 units GE Natural Science with Lab
Economic HL 4,5 6 units ECON 160& 161 6 GE Social Science
English A1 HL 4,5 6 units English 155& 255 3 units GE Basic Subjects Written Comp/ 3 units GE Arts and Humanities
English A2 HL 4,5 6 units No equivalency 6 units GE Basic Subjects Written Composition
Geography HL 4,5 6 units No Equivalency 6 units GE Social Science
Language A1 HL (any Foreign Language) 4,5 6 units No equivalency 6 units GE Comparative Cultural Studies
Language A2 HL (any Foreign Language) 4,5 6 units No equivalency 6 units GE Comparative Cultural Studies
Language B HL (any Foreign Language) 4,5 6 units No equivalency 6 units GE Comparative Cultural Studies
Geography HL 4,5 6 units No equivalency 6 units GE Social Sciences
History Americas HL 4,5 6 units No equivalency 6 units GE Social Science or U.S. History
History Asia/OCE HL 4,5 6 units No equivalency 6 units GE Social Science or Comparative Cultural Studies
History of Europe HL 4,5 6 units No equivalency 6 units GE Social Science or Comparative Cultural Studies
Mathematics HL 4,5 6 units No equivalency 6 units GE Basic Skills Mathematics
Music HL 4,5 6 units No equivalency 6 units GE Arts & Humanities
Philosophy HL 4,5 6 units PHIL 150 6 units GE Arts & Humanities
Physics HL 4,5 6 units No equivalency 6 units GE Natural Science
Psychology HL 4,5 6 units No equivalency 6 units GE Social Science
Sociology HL 4,5 6 units No equivalency 6 units GE Social Science
Theatre HL 4,5 6 units No equivalency 6 units GE Arts & Humanities
Visual Arts HL 4,5 6 units No equivalency 6 units GE Arts & Humanities

Additional courses at appropriate level and score may be accepted upon review. Please contact the office of International Admissions and Evaluations for more information at (818) 677-3760.

H-9. Undergraduate Enrollment in Graduate Level Courses

Advanced undergraduates may enroll in 500-600 level courses during their final undergraduate semester at CSUN. Although these courses are intended primarily for graduate students, undergraduates may enroll if they have successfully completed a substantial number of 300-400 level courses in the discipline and if they have taken the 400-level prerequisites for the 500-level course. Credits earned in 500-level course may be used toward the completion of a baccalaureate degree. 600-level courses are limited to students enrolled in master’s and credential programs and cannot be used to complete the baccalaureate degree.