Academic Assessment

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Degree-Granting Programs

Africana Studies

The interdisciplinary degree program in Africana Studies will accomplish the following:

  1. Students will demonstrate an ability to evaluate and analyze the political, social-historical and cultural perspectives of African and African Diaspora communities.
  2. Students will demonstrate through written and oral communication the ability to critically analyze the cultural, political and historical contexts of African and African Diaspora experiences.
  3.  Students will identify and demonstrate culturally appropriate skills in research design and methodology used to examine the various dynamics of African and African Diaspora communities.
  4.  Students will demonstrate applicable knowledge of requisite skills in Africana Studies through civic and community engagement.
  5. Students will demonstrate cultural competencies in the development of creative writing, the production of creative works, and/or critical analysis of work by African and Diaspora communities.

Anthropology

B.A., Anthropology

Students completing the undergraduate degree program in Anthropology will be able to:

  1. Recognize characteristics of human diversity across space and time from an anthropological perspective
  2. Explain the evolutionary process, particularly as it relates to primat and specifically hominin evolution
  3. Describe biological and behavioral variation among human and non-human primates in context
  4. Discuss the concept of culture as a fundamental principle in anthropology
  5. Identify the causes and consequences of cultural diversity, social inequalities and change in human societies
  6. Discuss anthropological theories and paradigms, how they have changed over time and how they are applied to explain fundamental aspects of the human condition, such as cultural diversity and social change
  7. Demonstrate the ability to conceptualize, collect, describe, ana lyze and interpret anthropological evidence according to generally accepted professional practice
  8. Discuss ethics as they pertain to 21st century anthropology
  9. Explain how anthropology may be used to engage in contemporary issues
  10. Develop effective communication using anthropological standards

M.A. Anthropology

Students completing the Master's degree program in Anthropology should be able to:

  1. Analyze characteristics of human diversity across space and time from an anthropological perspective
  2. Analyze the evolutionary process particularly as it relates to primate and specifically hominin evolution
  3. Analyze biological and behavioral variation among human and non-human primates in context
  4. Analyze the concept of culture as a fundamental principle in anthropology
  5. Analyze the causes and consequences of cultural diversity, social inequalities and change in human societies
  6. Analyze anthropological theories and paradigms, how they have changed over time and how they are applied to explain fundamental aspects of the human condition such as cultural diversity and social change
  7. Independently conceptualize, collect, describe, analyze and interpret anthropological evidence according to generally accepted professional practice
  8. Analyze ethics as they pertain to 21st century anthropology
  9. Examine how anthropology may be used to engage in contemporary issues
  10. Communicate effectively using anthropological standards
  11. Synthesize and evaluate current issues and debates in the subfields of anthropology

Art

B.A., Art 

  1. Acquire a basic knowledge, theories, and concepts about art; develop a foundation of art skills and a high level of craftspersonship; communicate ideas and concepts through writing, speaking and art making; acquire a competency with the tools and technologies associated with the visual arts.
  2. Broaden knowledge of ancient through contemporary art; develop an understanding of the theoretical, cultural, and historical contexts of art.
  3. Apply processes of generating and solving problems in art; analyze, interpret and question traditional methodologies and preconceived notions of art and art making.
  4. Explore and engage in interdisciplinary forms of art making.
  5. Develop an appreciation and tolerance of diverse perspectives dealing with art, culture, teaching and learning.
  6. Become involved in both individual and collaborative art experiences with other students, faculty, and community.
  7. Develop a career path for an art profession or an art-related field; develop an understanding of the demands and expectations of that area of art profession or art field.

Student Learning Outcomes of the Master of Arts and Master of Fine Art in Visual Arts Program

All students will learn:

  1. Basic Skills
  2. Master advanced knowledge, theories, and concepts about art; communication ideas and concepts through writing, speaking, and art making.
  3. Art Knowledge:
  4. Broaden the knowledge of contemporary art and the understanding of the theoretical, cultural and historical contexts of art through writing, speaking, and art making on advanced levels.
  5. Critical Thinking:
  6. Master processes of generating and solving problems in art; analyze, interpret, and question traditional methodologies and preconceived notions of art and art making on an advanced level.
  7. Interdisciplinary Connections:
  8. Explore and engage in interdisciplinary forms of art making.
  9. Global Perspectives:
  10. Develop an appreciation and tolerance of diverse perspectives dealing with art, culture, teaching, and learning.
  11. Collaboration:
  12. Become involved in both individual and collaborative art experiences among students, faculty, and community.
  13. Professional Preparation:
  14. Master an understanding of what it means to be a professional artist; develop an advanced understanding of the demands and expectations of the art profession and art field.

Student Learning Outcomes of the Master of Arts in Art History Program

All students will learn:

  1. Basic Skills
  2. Master advanced knowledge, theories, and concepts about art history; acquire the ability to develop a research topic in a specific field of art history.
  3. Art Knowledge:
  4. Broaden the knowledge of historical and contemporary art and the understanding of the theoretical, cultural and historical contexts of art through researching, speaking, and writing on advanced levels.
  5. Critical Thinking:
  6. Master processes of generating and solving problems in art history writing; analyze, interpret, and question traditional methodologies and preconceived notions of art and art making on an advanced level.
  7. Interdisciplinary Connections:
  8. Explore and engage in interdisciplinary methodologies through art writing, conversing, or curating.
  9. Global Perspectives:
  10. Develop an appreciation and tolerance of diverse perspectives dealing with art, culture, teaching and learning.
  11. Collaboration:
  12. Become involved in both individual and collaborative art experience among students, faculty, and community.
  13. Professional Preparation:
  14. Master an understanding of what it means to be a professional art historian; develop an advanced understanding of the demands and expectations of the art profession and art field.

We teach our students to experience and value visual thinking and creative problem solving in art, as well as recognize the concurrent importance of perception, experimentation, innovation and critical thinking. Understand the history and traditions of art with their relevance to social and community concerns as well as the art of different cultures. Utilize and interact with the services, facilities and technologies offered throughout the University as well as those provided by the Art Department.

Asian American Studies

B.A., Asian American Studies

  1. Students will develop a core competency in the history, culture and experience of Asian Pacific American communities in the United States.
  2. Working from a social justice approach to race, class, ethnicity, gender and sexuality, students will develop and apply their critical thinking skills as demonstrated through written assignments, oral presentations, class discussion and examinations.
  3. Students will acquire and develop effective communication skills.
  4. Students will develop and demonstrate basic research skills as they learn about the particular dynamics of working with Asian Pacific American communities.
  5. Students will demonstrate an applied knowledge and practical application of their acquired skills through student and community work, in the process, learning the value and importance of community service.

Athletic Training

B.S., Athletic Training

The Department of Kinesiology is a learning-centered community that educates and inspires its students to understand and appreciate human movement for personal expression and wellness throughout the lifespan. In doing so, students and faculty work together to improve quality of life for themselves and their community. The Department values and respects the spectrum of human diversity. An integrated approach to the teaching, learning and application of human movement provides opportunities and experiences to achieve the following learning outcomes:

  1. Apply an integrated kinesiological approach to encourage the adoption of healthy and physically active lifestyles, across diverse populations;
  2. Apply evidence-based practices to enhance the study of human movement;.
  3. Demonstrate competent problem solving strategies through intentional practices; and
  4. Demonstrate knowledge of kinesthetic forms, processes and structures as they apply to the personal expression and culture of human movement.

Biology

B.S., Biology

The Biology Department has identified five learning outcomes to be achieved by its students as a result of completing one of its baccalaureate degree programs.

  • 1. Students will demonstrate knowledge of a) the structure and metabolism of cells; b) the transmission and expression of genetic information; and c) the immediate and long-term (evolutionary) consequences of interactions between organisms and their environment.
  • 2. Students will demonstrate specialized knowledge in one or more disciplines of biology.
  • 3. Students will be aware of and/or capable of using new and existing methods and technologies in these disciplines.
  • 4. Students must demonstrate facility in applying the methods of scientific inquiry, including observation, hypothesis testing, data collection and analysis.
  • 5. Students will have the ability to engage the biology literature and to communicate scientific information verbally and/or in writing.

B.A., Biology

The Biology Department has identified five learning outcomes to be achieved by its students as a result of completing one of its baccalaureate degree programs.

  1. Students will demonstrate knowledge of a) the structure and metabolism of cells; b) the transmission and expression of genetic information; and c) the immediate and long-term (evolutionary) consequences of interactions between organisms and their environment.
  2. Students will demonstrate specialized knowledge in one or more disciplines of biology.
  3. Students will be aware of and/or capable of using new and existing methods and technologies in these disciplines.
  4. Students must demonstrate facility in applying the methods of scientific inquiry, including observation, hypothesis testing, data collection and analysis.
  5. Students will have the ability to engage the biology literature and to communicate scientific information verbally and/or in writing.

M.S., Biology

The Biology Department has identified four learning outcomes to be achieved by its students as a result of completing the M.S program.

  1. Students can demonstrate specialized knowledge in one or more disciplines of Biology.
  2. Students are aware of and/or capable of using new and existing methods and technologies.
  3. Students can demonstrate facility in applying the methods of scientific inquiry, including observation, hypothesis testing, data collection, and analysis 
  4. Students can demonstrate professional level oral and written communication skills within a discipline of Biology.

Business

Students in Business will learn the following:

  1. Our students have strong written and oral communication skills.
  2. Our students have strong problem-solving and critical thinking skills, including the application of information technology.
  3. Our students understand ethics and social responsibility.
  4. Our students understand the global context of modern business.
  5. Our students understand the cross-functional nature of business problems.
  6. Our students understand and apply key business concepts.
  7. Our students can work effectively in teams.

Chemistry and Biochemistry

B.A./B.S Chemistry and B.S Biochemistry

Student Learning Outcomes of the Undergraduate Program

  1. Demonstrate basic knowledge in the following areas of chemistry: analytical, biochemistry inorganic, organic and physical.
  2. Organize and communicate scientific information clearly and concisely, both verbally and in writing.
  3. Effectively utilize the scientific literature, including the use of modern electronic search and retrieval methods, to research a chemistry topic or to conduct chemical research.
  4. Work effectively and safely in a laboratory environment, including the ability to follow experimental chemical procedures and maintain a proper lab notebook.
  5. Effectively utilize modern chemical instrumentation to obtain data and perform research.
  6. Perform qualitative and quantitative chemical analysis, including the application of computer technology for such analyses.
  7. Describe the impact of chemistry on our world, including the environment, the economy and medicine.
  8. Demonstrate an ability to determine the scientific validity of a claim that pertains to consumer products, the environment or the life sciences.

M.S Chemistry and M.S Biochemistry

  1. Demonstrate basic knowledge in the following areas of chemistry: analytical, biochemistry, inorganic, organic and physical.
  2. Organize and communicate scientific information clearly and concisely, both verbally an in writing.
  3. Effectively utilize the scientific literature to research a chemistry topic or to conduct chemical research.
  4. Work effectively and safely in a laboratory notebook and use advanced chemical instrumentation.
  5. Use computer technology for advanced chemical applications.
  6. Demonstrate the ability to work independently in the lab by designing solutions to problems or devising experiments to test hypotheses. 

 

Central American Studies

  1. Students will develop critical thinking, writing, and reading skills.
  2. Students will acquire an awareness of the complexity of the historical, social, and cultural developments in Central America as well as an understanding of the diverse Central American cultures, ethnicities, experiences, and worldviews.
  3. Students will expand their understanding of the transnational Central American community’s experience, and its economic and cultural contributions to the US and Central America.
  4. Students will develop the intellectual and social foundations, and leadership skills necessary for promoting social change in US society, especially, in relation to Central American peoples in the US.
  5. Students will recognize, understand, evaluate, and change the culture of exclusion that has been prevalent in Central America and the United States.

Chicana/o Studies

Student Learning Outcomes of the Undergraduate Program, B.A.

  1. Demonstrate an ability to think critically, analytically, and creatively about the Chicana/o experience in the local and global society.
  2. Demonstrate competency in oral, written, and research skills.
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of creative and performance arts.
  4. Acquire a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of Chicana/o Studies history, culture, arts, language, and socio-political issues.
  5. Acquire the leadership skills that will promote social change in Chicana/o communities and the broader society.

M.A., Chicana/o Studies

  1. Demonstrate a refined ability to think critically, analytically and creatively beyond the undergraduate level about the Chicana/o experience in the local and global society. 
  2. Demonstrate strong oral, writing and research skills.
  3. Demonstrate a sufficient level of expertise in a particular field within the discipline, having read most of the literature in that area, and be able to develop and teach a course in that field. 
  4. Demonstrate a critical understanding of the role of the creative and performance arts in the expression of Chicana/o Studies identities and social issues. 
  5. Master a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of Chicana/o Studies history, culture, arts, language and socio-political issues. 
  6. Choose an area of research within Chicana/o studies and contribute to this area through the thesis project. 
  7. Develop further leadership skills that will promote social change in Chicana/o communities and the broader society. 

 

Child and Adolescent Development

B.A., Child and Adolescent Development Objectives:

  1.  Demonstrate knowledge of the theories, concepts, and methodology that underlie the study of the physical, cognitive, and social development of children and adolescents and the multiple contexts in which they live. Apply developmental theories in community settings.
  2. Write critically about theories and constructs of child and adolescent development. Orally deliver information in a manner that engages an audience. 
  3. Facilitate the development of children in a culturally pluralistic society. Gain knowledge of culture, race, and ethnicity while increasing their personal self-awareness and discovering strategies for implementing social justice within the larger community.
  4. Demonstrate technological literacy that allows both access to and dissemination of information electronically. Demonstrate effective management of information by using media sources and complying with the ethics of manipulating and presenting information.
  5. Describe, critique, and practice various empirical methodologies used to study child and adolescent development including design, data analysis, and interpretation.
  6. . Articulate and participate in the importance of developing professionalism including the areas of career exploration, ethical issues of direct services to youth, and service learning in the community. 

Cinema and Television Arts

B.A., Cinema and Television Arts 

  1. understand and articulate the history, theories, and critical models of cinema and the electronic media;
  2. research, structure, and write dramatic and non-dramatic scripts for cinema, television, and multimedia;
  3. employ pre-production, production, and post-production techniques for all electronic and digital media formats in both the studio and the field;
  4. conceptualize, produce, direct, edit, and distribute cinema projects for both entertainment and informational purposes;
  5. operate and manage business structures, personnel, budgets, advertising, sales, research, and regulation of independent, studio, and network electronic media.

M.F.A., Screenwriting

  1. Demonstrate advanced writing proficiency appropriate for entry into competitive professional screenwriting and teleplay-writing careers.
  2. Demonstrate critical-thinking, research and analytical skills appropriate from accomplishing professional and personal goals.
  3. Demonstrate the practical communication and technical skills required for entry into a competitive professional field.
  4. Demonstrate insight into and objective understanding of screen story structures when analyzing scripts or outlines, and ability to offer positive, ethical solutions for story problems.
  5. Demonstrate understanding of the issues of cultural inclusiveness and diversity in creative work, along with a basic understanding of creative ownership law. 

Communication Disorders and Sciences

Undergraduate Student Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate basic knowledge of the theories and principles of acoustics and anatomy and physiology of normal speech, language and audition.
  2. Demonstrate basic knowledge of normal speech, language and auditory development and function as well as an understanding of the theories and principles of their acquisition.
  3. Demonstrate basic knowledge of speech, language and auditory disorders, including etiologies and characteristics.
  4. Demonstrate basic knowledge and application of diagnostic and therapeutic techniques for speech, language and auditory disorders.
  5. Demonstrate application of evidence based practice and clinical problem-solving skills to defend assessment and treatment choices.

Graduate Student Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate appropriate comportment and knowledge of professional standards:
    1. show professional and ethical behavior with superiors, clients and colleagues in clinical settings.
    2. demonstrate understanding of professional practice patterns and ethical standards.
  1. Demonstrate cultural sensitivity and knowledge of the effects of cultural difference on communication.
  2. Demonstrate professional entry level knowledge and clinical application of:
    1. the theories and models underlying typical and atypical speech, language, cognition, auditory and swallowing processes, as well as changes associated with normal aging.
    2. diagnostic and therapeutic techniques for speech, language, cognition, swallowing and auditory disorders across the lifespan.
  1. Integrate theoretical knowledge with clinical experience and application of research literature in clinical practice in order to problem solve clinical cases.

Communication Studies

Bachelor of Arts

Students receiving a Bachelor's degree from the Communication Studies Department will be able to:

  1. Identify, descibe and explain the role of communication in constructing reality through concepts, practices and rituals;
  2. Analyze communication practices, structures, messages and effects in a vari- ety of contexts;
  3. Describe and explain the relationship between communication and culture;
  4. Appropriately identify effective and ethical communication;
  5. Identify and apply techniques for effectively communicating in a multicultural global society.

Master of Arts

Students receiving a Master's degree from the Communication Studies Department will be able to:

  1. Critically examine how communication affects the social construction of reality.
  2. Define and discuss some basic tenets or theories of human communication from the perspective of one or more specific areas of the field (Rhetoric, Communication Theory, and Performance, Language and Cultural Studies).
  3. Critically assess and analyze scholarly writing in the field.
  4. Analyze and critically interpret/evaluate communication practices and research.
  5. Analyze and critically evaluate the relationship between communication and culture.

Computer Science

B.S. Computer Science

  1. Apply knowledge of computing and mathematics appropriate to the discipline
  2. Analyze a problem, and identify and define the computing requirements appropriate to its solution
  3. Design, implement, and evaluate a computer-based system, process, component, or program to meet desired needs
  4. Function effectively on teams to accomplish a common goal
  5. Understand professional, ethical, legal, security and social issues and responsibilities
  6. Communicate effectively with a range of audiences
  7. Analyze the local and global impact of computing on individuals, organizations, and society
  8. Recognize the need for and engage in continuing professional development
  9. Use current techniques, skills, and tools necessary for computing practice
  10. Apply mathematical foundations, algorithmic principles, and computer science theory in the modeling and design of computer-based systems in a way that demonstrates comprehension of the tradeoffs involved in design choices
  11. Apply design and development principles in the construction of software systems of varying complexity

M.S. Computer Science

  1. Demonstrate a knowledge and competence in such fundamental areas of computer science as algorithms, design and analysis, computational theory, computer architecture and software-based systems.
  2. Demonstrate the analytic skills necessary to effectively evaluate the relative merits of software and computer systems and algorithmic approaches.
  3. Demonstrate a breadth of knowledge in a choice of application areas in computer science, including networks, artificial intelligence, graphics, human computer interfaces, databases, embedded applications and information security.
  4. Understand computer science topics (such as database management, data security, program efficiency, etc.) in a global context (ethics, privacy, human expectations, etc.)
  5. Effectively communicate in both written and oral form, especially in areas related to computer science.
  6. Work productively in a team or collaborative settings to achieve common goals or purposes, including the ability to lead a team.
  7. Analyze, evaluate and synthesize research and apply theoretical ideas to practical settings.
  8.  Independently continue studies in computer science throughout their lives.

BS Computer Information Technology

Student Outcomes: The Bachelor of Science Program in Computer Information Technology will enable students to attain, by the time of graduation: 

  1.  An ability to apply knowledge of computing and mathematics appropriate to the program’s student outcomes and to the discipline 
  2.  An ability to analyze a problem, and identify and define the computing requirements appropriate to its solution
  3.  An ability to design, implement, and evaluate a computer-based system, process, component, or program to meet desired needs 
  4.  An ability to function effectively on teams to accomplish a common goal 
  5.  An understanding of professional, ethical, legal, security and social issues and responsibilities
  6. An ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences 
  7.  An ability to analyze the local and global impact of computing on individuals, organizations, and society 
  8.  Recognition of the need for and an ability to engage in continuing professional development 
  9.  An ability to use current techniques, skills, and tools necessary for computing practice
  10.  An ability to use and apply current technical concepts and practices in the core information technologies of human computer interaction, information management, programming, networking, and web systems and technologies
  11.  An ability to identify and analyze user needs and take them into account in the selection, creation, evaluation and administration of computer-based systems
  12.  An ability to effectively integrate IT-based solutions into the user environment
  13.  An understanding of best practices and standards and their application
  14.  An ability to assist in the creation of an effective project plan

Deaf Studies

B.A Deaf Studies 

  1. Demonstrate ability to communicate in American Sign Language (ASL) with Deaf people.
  2. Identify the major features of and issues in the Deaf Community and Deaf Culture.
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of the impact of power, privilege, and oppression on the Deaf Community that result in Deaf people’s experience of prejudice, discrimination, and inequity.
  4. Demonstrate an understanding of how the study of Deaf Studies enables individuals to make informed judgments that strengthen the Deaf Community.
  5. Demonstrate an appreciation of the contributions of Deaf arts and humanities for shedding light on what it means to be deaf.
  6. Describe communication between hearing people and Deaf people that is vital to society.
  7. Analyze critically how a Deaf person’s socio-cultural history affects one’s sense of self and relationship to others.
  8. Reflect critically on one’s abilities to interact with Deaf individu¬als socially, and professionally, and evaluate the level of integration achieved.

Economics

Students in Economics will:

  1. Have strong communication skills.
  2. Have strong quantitative skills, including the ability to use and interpret economic statistics.
  3. Be able to express key economic concepts both intuitively and more formally.
  4. Understand how a decentralized market economy organizes economic activity, as well as factors that may impede that process.
  5. Understand key macroeconomic variables and how fiscal and monetary policies affect them.
  6. Understand how institutions, government policy, and regulation affect economic growth and the relative wealth of economies.

Education - Educational Leadership and Policy Studies

  1. Planning systemic reform and managing the change process in collaboration with fellow educators and other stakeholders, based on a shared vision of learning.
  2. Guiding and supporting staff in nurturing a school, district or community college culture and program conducive to the effective instruction of all students and to the professional growth of all employees.
  3. Using data and technology effectively to assess student achievement, evaluate staff and programs, and plan and implement accountability systems.
  4. Becoming critical consumers of educational research and producers of action research who apply the lessons of research to student, school/district or community college improvement.
  5. Promoting culturally proficient policies and practices that recognize and value difference and ensure equity.
  6. Managing fiscal, physical, and human resources to ensure an effective, safe learning and working environment.
  7. Collaborating with families and community members, responding to diverse community interests and needs, and mobilizing community resources at the local, state, and federal level.
  8. Modeling ethical practice, strong skills in communication and collaboration, and the development of leadership capacity in themselves and others.
  9. Understanding, navigating, responding to, and influencing the larger policy environment and the political, social, economic, legal, and cultural context of education.

Education - Educational Psychology and Counseling

  1. Develop and apply expertise in their fields of study.
  2. Think critically and engage in reflective ethical and legal practice throughout their education and professional lives.
  3. Develop empathic respectful and congruent interpersonal skills and abilities to work successfully with groups and individuals from diverse backgrounds in educational community and mental health settings.
  4. Communicate effectively using oral written listening and non-verbal attending and observational skills.
  5. Become information competent scholars and researchers capable of utilizing current technology in work environments while engaging in and disseminating creative empirical and applied research studies and program evaluations.
  6. Collaborate skillfully and respectfully as leaders consultants and team members in a variety of settings.
  7. Develop skills necessary to assess and evaluate individuals and groups and to utilize current technology in work environments.
  8. Maintain a multicultural and global perspective emphasizing social justice gender and educational equity access and support.
  9. View their roles as preventative educative and therapeutic in promoting well-being healthy relationships academic success and career mastery.
  10. Provide service through a wide variety of field-based partnerships informed by theory research and practice.
  11. Act as advocates with initiative perception and vision to lead and transform the practices and policies of those who provide services to individuals families schools organizations community and policymakers.
  12. Pursue lifelong professional and personal development through such mediums as continuing education information technology psychological counseling participation and leadership in professional organizations and doctoral study.

Education - Elementary Education

  1. Reflective practice by examining their pedagogical content knowledge, and skills to improve diverse students’ learning needs.
  2. Theoretical understanding by reading, synthesizing, and evaluating educational theory and research and applying research findings to their practice in diverse classroom settings .
  3. Research skills by designing and conducting research and presenting their findings at a professional level in oral and written forms.
  4. Educational awareness by knowing current educational issues and how those impact schools.
  5. Leadership by influencing policy and practice in educational communities through advocacy and example.

Education - Secondary Education

  1. Reflective practice by critically examining their subject knowledge, pedagogical content knowledge, and pedagogical skills to improve their diverse students’ learning;
  2. Theoretical Understanding by reading, synthesizing, and evaluating educational theory and research in their field and applying research findings to their practice in diverse classroom settings;
  3. Research Skills by designing and conducting research ethically and effectively and presenting their findings at a professional level in oral and written forms;
  4. Educational Awareness by knowing current discipline-based and general educational issues and how those impact schools; and
  5. Leadership by influencing policy and practice in educational communities through advocacy and example.

Education - Special Education

  1. Demonstrate competencies as a scholar in the field of special education.
  2. Exhibit leadership skills in the field of special education.
  3. Serve as an advocate for students with disabilities and their families.

Engineering - Civil Engineering and Construction Management

BS in Civil Engineering Objectives: 

  1. an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering;
  2. an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data;
  3. an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs;
  4. an ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams;
  5. an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems;
  6. an understanding of professional and ethical responsibilities;
  7. an ability to communicate effectively;
  8. the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global and societal context;
  9. a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in lifelong learning;
  10. a knowledge of contemporary issues;
  11. an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice;
  12. a proficiency in a minimum of four (4) recognized major civil engineering areas;
  13. an ability to perform civil engineering design by means of design experiences integrated throughout the professional component of the curriculum; and
  14. an understanding of professional practice issues such as: procurement of work; bidding versus quality based selection processes; how the design professionals and the construction professions interact to construct a project; the importance of professional licensure and continuing education; and/or other professional practice issues.

BS in Construction Management Objectives: 

Graduates of the Bachelor of Science in Construction Management Program at California State University, Northridge will have the following learning outcomes:

  1.  an ability to demonstrate an appropriate mastery of the knowledge, techniques, skills, and modern tools of their disciplines
  2.  an ability to apply current knowledge and adapt to emerging applications of mathematics, science, engineering, and technology
  3.  an ability to conduct, analyze, and interpret experiments and apply experimental results to improve processes
  4.  an ability to apply creativity in the design of systems, components, or processes appropriate to program objectives
  5.  an ability to function effectively on teams
  6.  an ability to identify, analyze, and solve technical problems
  7.  an ability to communicate effectively
  8.  an ability to recognize the need for, and possess the ability to pursue lifelong learning
  9.  an ability to understand professional, ethical, and social responsibilities
  10.  an ability to recognize contemporary professional, societal, and global issues and awareness of and respect for diversity
  11.  a commitment to quality, timeliness and continuous improvement
  12.  knowledge of construction contracts, documents, specifications and codes
  13.  knowledge of construction methods and materials
  14.  knowledge of construction surveying
  15.  knowledge of statics and strength of materials
  16.  knowledge of material quantity and cost estimates of projects
  17.  knowledge of productivity software to solve technical problems
  18.  knowledge of construction accounting and economics
  19.  an ability to utilize modern instruments, methods and techniques
  20.  knowledge of construction law and ethics
  21.  knowledge of soils, and foundations
  22.  knowledge of scheduling and project management
  23.  knowledge of construction safety

 

 

Engineering - Electrical and Computer Engineering

Electrical Engineering Objectives

The electrical engineering program strives to prepare graduates that will:

  1. have professional careers in electrical engineering or related technical fields, or continue their studies at the graduate level; and
  2. continue their professional development throughout their careers.

Graduates of the Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering program at California State University, Northridge will have:

An ability to apply knowledge of math, science, and engineering to the analysis of electrical engineering problems.

  1. An ability to design and conduct scientific and engineering experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data.
  2. An ability to design systems which include hardware and/or software components within realistic constraints such as cost, manufacturability, safety and environmental concerns.
  3. An ability to function in multidisciplinary teams.
  4. An ability to identify, formulate, and solve electrical engineering problems.
  5. An understanding of ethical and professional responsibility.
  6. An ability to communicate effectively through written reports and oral presentations.
  7. An understanding of the impact of engineering in a social context.
  8. A recognition of the need for and an ability to engage in life-long learning.
  9. A broad education and knowledge of contemporary issues.
  10. An ability to use modern engineering techniques for analysis and design.
  11. Knowledge of probability and statistics.
  12. An ability to analyze and design complex devices and/or systems containing hardware and/or software components.
  13. Knowledge of math including differential equations, linear algebra, complex vari¬ables and discrete math.

The computer engineering program strives to prepare graduates that will:

  1. have professional careers in computer engineering or related technical fields, or continue their studies at the graduate level; and
  2. continue their professional development throughout their careers.

Graduates of the Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering program at California State University, Northridge will have:

  1. An ability to apply knowledge of math, science, and engineering to the analysis of computer engineering problems.
  2. An ability to design and conduct scientific and engineering experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data.
  3. An ability to design systems which include hardware and/or software components within realistic constraints such as cost, manufacturability, safety and environmental concerns.
  4. An ability to function in multidisciplinary teams.
  5. An ability to identify, formulate, and solve computer engineering problems.
  6. An understanding of ethical and professional responsibility.
  7. An ability to communicate effectively through written reports and oral presentations.
  8. An understanding of the impact of engineering in a social context.
  9. A recognition of the need for and an ability to engage in life-long learning.
  10. A broad education and knowledge of contemporary issues.
  11. An ability to use modern engineering techniques for analysis and design.
  12. Knowledge of probability and statistics.
  13. An ability to analyze and design complex devices and/or systems containing hardware and/or software components.
  14. Knowledge of math including differential equations, linear algebra, complex vari¬ables and discrete math.

Engineering - Manufacturing Systems Engineering and Management

  1. an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science and engineering;
  2. an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data;
  3. an ability to design and manage effective systems, processes, and environments for contemporary manufacturing enterprises;
  4. an ability to function productively on multicultural and multidisciplinary teams;
  5. an ability to identify, formulate, and solve manufacturing systems engineering problems;
  6. an ability to understand, practice, and nurture professional and ethical responsibilities;
  7. an ability to communicate effectively in both the written and spoken modes;
  8. the intellectual and educational breadth necessary for understanding the impact of manufacturing systems engineering solutions in a global and societal context;
  9. a recognition of the need for professional currency, and an ability to engage in perpetual learning;
  10. a knowledge of contemporary issues in society, as well as those of the profession;
  11. an ability to use the contemporary techniques, skills, and tools necessary for effective manufacturing systems engineering practice;
  12. an understanding of the behavior and properties of materials as they are altered and influenced by processing in manufacturing;
  13. an understanding of the design of products, and the equipment, tooling and environment necessary for their manufacture;
  14. an understanding of the creation of competitive advantage through effective management of contemporary manufacturing enterprises;
  15. an ability to apply advanced methods to the analysis, synthesis, and control of manufacturing systems; and
  16. an ability to measure manufacturing process variables and draw credible technical inferences.

Engineering - Mechanical Engineering

  1. an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering
  2. an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data
  3. an ability to design a mechanical/thermal system, component, or process to meet desired needs
  4. an ability to function on multidisciplinary teams
  5. an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems
  6. an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
  7. an ability to communicate effectively
  8. the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global and societal context
  9. a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in lifelong learning
  10. a knowledge of contemporary issues
  11. an ability to use the techniques, skills and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice
  12. a knowledge of chemistry and calculus-based physics with depth in at least one
  13. applied advanced mathematics through multivariate calculus and differential equations
  14. familiarity in statistics and linear algebra
  15. ability to work professionally in both thermal and mechanical areas including the design and realization of such systems

English

B.A., English

Common Undergraduate Program Student Learning Outcomes

  1. Students will demonstrate critical reading skills.
  2. Students will demonstrate effective writing skills.
  3. Students will demonstrate knowledge of creative, literary, linguistic, and/or rhetorical theories.
  4. Students will analyze British and American cultural, historical and literary texts.
  5. Students will analyze culturally diverse texts.

Creative Writing Undergraduate Option Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Students will create and revise original writing by practicing techniques and strategies employed by experienced writers.
  2. Students will analyze drama, narrative and/or poetry to identify writerly strategies.
  3. Students will assess their own creative writing in relation to relevant literary and theoretical traditions.
  4. Students will demonstrate advanced creative writing skills by applying contemporary methods in at least one genre in a final portfolio for a capstone course.

Honors Undergraduate Option Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Students will articulate clear interpretations of cultural texts.
  2. Students will conduct independent research and scholarship.
  3. Students will present their research as a scholarly paper in a colloquium or conference setting.

Subject Matter Undergraduate Option Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Students will demonstrate their knowledge of the nature and structure of the English language and of its relationship to other human languages.
  2. Students will apply rhetorical and composition theory.
  3. Students will demonstrate fluency in the discourses pertaining to the disciplines of English.

Four Year-Integrated and Junior-Year Integrated Undergraduate Option Student Learning Outcomes:
(As determined by the Department of Secondary Education)

  1. Students will develop the ability to engage and support all secondary students (grades 6-12) in learning.
  2. Students will develop the ability to create and maintain effective environments for secondary student learning.
  3. Students will develop the ability to make subject matter comprehensible for student learning.
  4. Students will develop the ability to plan instruction and design learning experiences for all secondary students.
  5. Students will develop the ability to assess secondary students’ learning.
  6. Students will give evidence of the ability to develop as a professional educator.

M.A., English

Common Graduate Program Student Learning Outcomes

  1. Students will demonstrate knowledge of creative, cultural, linguistic, literary, performative, and/or rhetorical theories.
  2. Students will conduct research and/or produce creative work appropriate to their Option.
  3. Students will produce advanced analyses that take into account current schools of aesthetic, critical and historical methodology and are informed by disciplinary standards appropriate to their option.

Environmental and Occupational Health

B.S., Environmental and Occupational Health

Graduates of the undergraduate program in Environmental and Occupational Health will be able to:

1. Demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge of the recognition, evaluation and control of biological, chemical and physical factors that can impact human health and safety, and the environment.

2. Demonstrate knowledge of how to work in interdisciplinary teams to promote public and private action to protect public health and the environment.

3. Communicate environmental and occupational health concepts and programs to a variety of audiences, using both written and verbal forms of communication. 

4. Apply mathematical and critical reasoning to understand and incorporate new concepts in the field.

5. Demonstrate knowledge of organizational management and leadership skills.

6. Demonstrate knowledge of current regulatory and policy issues.

M.S., Environmental and Occupational Health

Graduates of the graduate program in Environmental and Occupational Health will learn:

1. Research design and analytical skills needed to critically evaluate scientific, technical and regulatory documents.

2. Oral, written and electronic communication skills to present information to professional groups, regulatory agencies and lay audiences.

3. Sufficient level of technical expertise in environmental and occupational health to competently solve general EOH problems.

4. A broad set of management skills to

     a. Competently manage an environmental or occupational program; and

     b. Initiate program planning and critical analysis of environmental or occupational health and safety programs

Family and Consumer Services

B.S., Family and Consumer Sciences 

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of human ecological theory and the integrative nature of the family and consumer sciences profession.
  2. Demonstrate and apply knowledge from their program of study to issues of well-being of individuals, families, and communities.
  3. Demonstrate and apply appropriate research, technology and skills in professional practice.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge and application of ethical and professional standards.

M.S., Family and Consumer Sciences 

In an effort to support the well-being of individuals, families, and communities through their professional area of interest in FCS, students will be able to:

  1. Apply the American Association of Family and Consumer Sciences (AAFCS) Code of Ethics in scholarship as FCS professionals.
  2. Demonstrate ongoing synthesis and application of relevant literature, current trends, current trends, and emerging issues within their professional area of interest within FCS.
  3. Design a research study/ creative project investigating topics within their professional area of interest including diverse populations.
  4. Apply sound evidence-based practices and applications with their professional area of interest in FCS.

Gender and Women's Studies

The Gender and Women’s Studies Department teaches students the following:

  1. Students will obtain a level of proficiency in the discipline of Gender and Women’s Studies which can include but are not limited to knowledge of feminist movements, intersectionality, queer and trans* studies, imperialism and coloniality, transnational feminisms, feminist theories, and/or feminist research methods.
  2. Students recognize the gender dimension of social, economic, cultural, historical, political, national and global inequalities, become familiar with a range of past and present major issues affecting women and men in society and learn how to critically assess these issues from a feminist perspective.
  3. Students articulate ethical propositions, demonstrate self-reflexivity about their ideas and social and political positions, and practice empathetic listening with each other and with the underprivileged that promote gender, race, class, and sexual justice, and democratic values.
  4. Students develop a sense of agency grounded in the development of their skills in oral and written communication. They learn to express ideas effectively, tailoring arguments and presentation styles to audience and context.
  5. Students obtain media literacy and information competency by learning how to use visual media and new technologies to assess, interpret and generate information from a variety of sources, including print and electronic media, film and video, and internet technologies.

Geography

We strive to help our students become persons of intellectual maturity by building a solid foundation of knowledge concerning the discipline of geography, the main features of earth’s environment, and the various processes giving rise to these features; developing skills necessary to access, acquire, and synthesize new information and ideas so as to become lifelong learners; establishing understanding of the theories, tools, and techniques necessary to become effective problem solvers; and finally practicing the facilities needed to become articulate communicators of their knowledge, opinions, and ideas.

B.A., Geography

  1. Demonstrate a foundation of knowledge characteristic of the learned individual .
  2. Demonstrate skills necessary to effectively acquire and synthesize new facts in a fashion characteristics of life-long learners. 
  3. Demonstrate abilities as effective evaluators and critical analyzers of information and ideas: creatively and/or productively apply analytical skills to problem or argument. 
  4. Demonstrate ability to communicate effectively using textual, oral, graphic or numeric data.
  5. Demonstrate productive civic and global citizenship; awareness of and respect for human diversity. 

 

Geological Sciences

B.S., Geology

Student Learning Outcomes

Undergraduate majors will receive instruction of sufficient breadth, depth and currency to prepare them for successful appointment to entry-level professional work or graduate school. At the time of graduation, they will be able to:

1) Demonstrate conceptual understanding of different earth materials and systems and the processes that shape them throughout their history;

2) Identify geologic problems, use scientific problem solving to aid in their solution, and reflect on the findings, both independently and in collaboration with others;

3) Demonstrate skills in standard data-collection and data-analysis methods in both lab and field settings; 

4) Communicate geoscience discoveries to scientific and public audiences with precision, clarity, and conviction. 

M.S., Geology

Graduates of the Master of Science Program will be well prepared to:

1) Assume responsible positions in industry or in government agencies;

2) Serve as instructors in secondary-school or community college classrooms; or

3) Enter Ph.D. programs at other universities.

At the time of graduation, they will be able to:

1) Demonstrate content knowledge appropriate to professional career goals;

2) Frame novel questions or problems in geology and determine the data required to answer them;

3) Collect high-quality geologic data using standard techniques and begin to develop state-of-the-art methods;

4) Apply theoretical, conceptual and observational knowledge to the analysis and interpretation of geologic data;

5) Compile and critique geologic literature pertinent to original research; and

6) Communicate geologic knowledge, findings and interpretations in reports, both written and oral, that are well-organized, well-illustrated and professionally presented.

Health Administration

Health Administrations, B.S. (Effective Fall 2011, formerly an option under Health Science)

The major provides a curriculum contemporary and relevant to evidence-based health administration practice and that meets national standards for excellence. Graduates of the undergraduate program in Health Sciences with the Option in Health Administration will:

  1. Demonstrate mastery of the conceptual and technical knowledge and skills relevant to successful health administration practice and which meet national standards for certification by the Association of University Programs in Health Administration.
  2. Demonstrate mastery of the analytical, written and oral communication, and interpersonal skills required for successful practice.
  3. Demonstrate an ability to integrate classroom knowledge and skills and be able to bridge the gap to the professional practice of health administration.
  4. Demonstrate an appreciation of the importance of professional ethics and continual professional growth.
  5. Demonstrate an ability to assume entry level staff and management positions in health services organizations.

M.S., Health Administration

Graduates of the Graduate Program in Health Administration will:

  1. Demonstrate mastery of the conceptual and technical knowledge and skills relevant to successful health administration practice.
  2. Demonstrate mastery of the analytical, written and oral communication and interpersonal skills required for successful practice.
  3. Demonstrate an ability to integrate classroom knowledge and skills, and be able to bridge the gap to the professional practice of health administration.
  4. Demonstrate an appreciation of the importance of professional ethics and continual professional growth.
  5. Demonstrate the knowledge, skills and professionalism to assume mid-level and leadership positions in health-care organizations.

Health Education

MPH Core Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Demonstrate mastery of oral, written and electronic media communication skills required in the public health and health field.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge and skills associated with multicultural influences and considerations that may impact delivery of culturally competent public health interventions.
  3. Apply the basic principles of ethics and social justice to public health practice, policy and the profession.
  4. Analyze public health issues using the social-ecological model of systems thinking.
  5. Explain how social, behavioral, environmental and biological factors contribute to specific individual and community health outcomes.
  6. Develop strategies that demonstrate collaborative methods for achieving organizational and community health goals.

MPH with Community Health Education Option Learning Outcomes:

  1. Demonstrate a mastery of public health and health education knowledge and skills, including community health program planning, implementation and evaluation; theories and application of health behavior change assessment and intervention; community organization; curriculum design; administration of health education programs and services; epidemiology; environmental health; research design; and biostatistics.
  2. Apply knowledge and skills necessary for program planning, implementation and evaluation of health education programs in a variety of practice settings.
  3. Demonstrate understanding of public health research methodology, including study design, hypotheses testing, data collection and analysis appropriate for health education practice, and the competent use of computer tools for analysis and presentation.
  4. Demonstrate the professional knowledge necessary to assume staff and leadership positions in the practice of public health education.

MPH with Applied Epidemiology Option Core Student Learning Outcomes:

  1. Describe how epidemiologic evidence informs public health practice and policy.
  2. Design epidemiologic studies to evaluate public health interventions and identify risk factors for health outcomes.
  3. Collect and analyze epidemiologic data using appropriate methodologies.
  4. Demonstrate proficient use of statistical software and other analytical tools in support of epidemiologic practice and research.
  5. Evaluate the strengths and limitations of epidemiologic investigations and incorporate into study interpretations and implications.

History

B.A., History 

  1. To analyze and explain problems of historical interpretation;
  2. To comprehend, articulate, and apply the various approaches to historical analysis;
  3. To learn to read and interpret historical sources critically and analytically;
  4. To express orally and exchange historical ideas;
  5. To select a research problem and search for relevant primary and secondary sources;
  6. To write a research essay using a scholarly format that includes footnotes and bibliography;
  7. To demonstrate a complex understanding of the history of the United States, Europe, and one other region or culture over a period of time;
  8. To understand historical subjects that transcend regional boundaries.

 

Humanities Program

  1. knowledge of the diversity of world cultures;
  2. ability to draw on the insights of various Humanities and Humanities-related disciplines;
  3. knowledge of and ability to apply cultural theory;
  4. ability to write effective analysis of multiple forms of cultural expression and creativity;
  5. ability to define a precise research project, choose an appropriate methodology, articulate clear analytical goals, and achieve those goals.

Jewish Studies Program

Student Learning Outcomes for the Major in Modern Jewish Studies

Students majoring in Modern Jewish Studies will be able to:

  1. Define and analyze significant Jewish religious beliefs, ethics, religious practices, philosophies, and cultural expressions;
  2. Demonstrate an ability to speak, comprehend, and write Modern Hebrew at an elementary level;
  3. Identify the major events of modern Jewish history and articulate the internal (within the Jewish community) and external (outside of the Jewish community) forces that lead up to and shaped these events;
  4. Describe the principal social contours of modern Jewish communities and families, and give examples of the complex and multifaceted forms of modern Jewish identity.

Student Learning Outcomes for the Minor:

Students minoring in Jewish Studies will be able to identify major themes, characters, literary works, and events of Jewish life in different international settings and in different historical periods. A Jewish Studies Minor will be able to articulate the significant interactions between Jewish culture and the surrounding cultures over time, as well as the changes within the Jewish community, and describe Jewish cultural developments as a function of a dynamic created by political, economic, and cultural forces.

Journalism

  1. Attain competency in writing basics such as grammar and punctuation, word usage and spelling, sentence and story structure and journalistic style;
  2. Attain competency in the gathering and critical analysis of information using such techniques as interviewing, observation and researching primary and secondary sources.
  3. Acquire expertise in thinking critically and creatively, while exercising news judgment, the organization and presentation of information in multiple journalistic forms (i.e., print, visual and electronic, and public relations).
  4. Develop an ethical basis for making journalistic and public relations decisions;
  5. Develop flexibility in working in evolving mass communication media and environments using a variety of technologies and techniques;
  6. Understand the historical, theoretical, legal and societal contexts within which journalists and public relations practitioners work.

Kinesiology

B.S., Kinesiology

Student Learning Outcomes of the Undergraduate Program

The Department of Kinesiology is a learning-centered community that educates and inspires its students to understand and appreciate human movement for personal expression and wellness throughout the lifespan. In doing so, students and faculty work together to improve quality of life for themselves and their community. The Department values and respects the spectrum of human diversity. An integrated approach to the teaching, learning and application of human movement provides opportunities and experiences to achieve the following learning outcomes:

  1. Apply an integrated kinesiological approach to encourage the adoption of healthy and physically active lifestyles, across diverse populations.
  2. Apply evidence-based practices to enhance the study of human movement.
  3. Demonstrate competent problem solving strategies through intentional practices.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge of kinesthetic forms, processes and structures as they apply to the personal expression and culture of human movement.

M.S. Kinesiology

The Department of Kinesiology is a learning-centered community that educates and inspires its students to understand and appreciate human movement for personal expression and wellness throughout the lifespan. In doing so, students and faculty work together to improve quality of life for themselves and their community. The Department values and respects the spectrum of human diversity. An integrated approach to the teaching, learning and application of human movement provides opportunities and experiences to achieve the following learning outcomes:

  1. Demonstrate a comprehensive and theoretical understanding of kinesiology through oral and written expression.
  2. Synthesize and apply theoretical concepts from the kinesiology research literature to the student’s chosen area of study.
  3. Conceptualize, plan and conduct a scholarly research or professional project based on a review of appropriate literature and utilizing appropriate methodologies.

Liberal Studies Program

The Student Learning Outcome of Liberal Studies for the Teacher Preparation.  Students will:

  1. Demonstrate proficient knowledge in the range of disciplines that relate to K-6 education and advanced level knowledge in their area of specialization.
  2. Demonstrate skills and knowledge needed to support all students in a diverse urban school environment.  
  3. Describe essential features of the California Standards and the Common Core State Standards and discuss their overall and specific goals. 
  4. Describe, draw connections between and apply basic methods of inquiry used in the Arts, Humanities, Mathematics, Social Sciences.
  5. Be able to successfully adapt their reading and writing to a range of disciplines, genres, media and purposes.
  6. Be able to reflect on and, for ITEP students, apply their knowledge and skills acquired in the major and in their specialization to teaching in the K-6 classroom.
  7. Be able to access, evaluate and make use of a range of informational resources (electronic and otherwise).

Student Learning Objectives for the Interdisciplinary Studies.  Students will:

  1. Be able to describe major themes and developments in ideas about the human condition, society, morality, intellectual achievement and aesthetics in select.
  2. Be able to describe how humans interact with and impact the physical environment. 
  3. Be able to describe and connect how these ideas are expressed and developed in the Arts and Sciences.
  4. Be able describe and apply methods of inquiry and analysis common to the various fields of study that encompass the Arts and Sciences at an introductory level, and demonstrate intermediate competence in describing and applying those methods of inquiry for the field of study of their area of specialization.
  5. Be able to express themselves effectively when presenting subject matter relevant to their area of specialization in the Arts and Sciences.
  6. Exhibit basic competency in a foreign language and intermediate competency if it reflects their area of specialization.

Linguistics/TESL

B.A Linguistics 

  1. Express what linguists mean by “knowing a human language” by demonstrating knowledge of such core fields as phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics.
  2. Verbalize what is involved in the acquisition and development of language and discuss its biological and social foundations.
  3. Describe key concepts from such fields as pragmatics and discourse analysis and relate them to language data.
  4. Verbalize how sociocultural diversity manifests itself in language using methods and concepts from the field of sociolinguistics.
  5. Read, evaluate, and write effectively about linguistic topics.
  6. Define the connections between linguistic study and its practical applications.

Student Learning Outcomes of the Graduate Program

Masters in Linguistics:

  1. Demonstrate a solid knowledge of linguistic theory in the areas of phonetics, phonology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, language acquisition and sociolinguistics.
  2. Demonstrate advanced knowledge in at least three major subfields of linguistics.
  3. Describe the relevance of linguistics to a range of professional settings and to general issues at large.

     

  4. Read, analyze, and critically evaluate linguistic research, demonstrating a high level of critical thinking and problem solving about linguistic issues.
  5. Demonstrate the ability to conduct original research or apply current linguistic theories to new sets of data, analyze data, and draw appropriate conclusions.  

Masters in TESL:

  1. Demonstrate a basic knowledge of linguistic theory in phonetics, phonology, morphology, and syntax.  
  2. Demonstrate a solid knowledge of TESL theory and methodology.
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of how theories of language structure and theories of language in context and pedagogy can be applied in teaching language.
  4. Demonstrate the ability to read, analyze, and critically evaluate research and demonstrate a high level of critical thinking and problem solving.
  5. Demonstrate skills in the design of TESL testing and assessment as well as TESL curriculum    development.

Mathematics

B.A. Mathematics

At the end of their program of study, students will be able to

  1. Demonstrate a command of the content usually associated with an undergraduate degree in mathmatics;
  2. Communicate mathematical ideas clearly and cogently, both orally and in written form;
  3. Present clear and rigorous proofs;
  4. Build mathematical models and demonstrate problem solving skills, including proper use of mathematical software;
  5. Understand the principles underlying various branches of mathematics and recognize their interrelationship;
  6. Experience mathematical discovery and independently read and understand mathematical articles or texts written at an undergraduate level.

Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures (MCLL)

  1. Demonstrate fluency in listening, speaking, reading and writing in the target language.
  2. Demonstrate ability to reason and present sound arguments in both oral and written discourse.
  3. Demonstrate critical thinking in the analysis of traditions, cultures, and civilizations.
  4. Understand the nature of language, its function, structure, and interactional (social) purposes.
  5. Analyze and clearly articulate interpretations of literary texts.

M.A., Spanish

 

Music

  1. demonstrate the ability to hear, identify, and work conceptually with the elements of music, through sight-reading, basic keyboard proficiency, and musical analysis.
  2. perform standard repertoire appropriate to their performance area, as individuals, members of ensembles, and/or conductors.
  3. demonstrate a working knowledge of music history within their area of specialization and an acquaintance with the history, cultural background and repertories beyond that area, including a wide selection of Western and world music literature.
  4. demonstrate a working knowledge of music technology and its application to their area of specialization.
  5. develop pedagogical and/or clinical skills fundamental to their area of specialization for application across a variety of music and music-related professions.
  6. demonstrate professional competence in the execution of business processes and practices commonly employed within their area of specialization.
  7. create derivative or original music in both extemporaneous and written form.

Student Learning Outcomes of the Graduate Program

After successful completion of all requirements for the Master of Arts in Music or the Master of Music degree, students will:

  1. demonstrate continuing development of professional and scholarly competence within their area of specialization.
  2. demonstrate continuing development of individual talent, musical interests, and philosophies to be used creatively to preserve and extend the cultural heritage of music.
  3. demonstrate artistic and intellectual rigor in the organization, interpretation, communication, and dissemination of musical knowledge.
  4. demonstrate pedagogical skills fundamental to their area of specialization applicable across a variety of music and music-related professions.
  5. demonstrate professional competence in the execution of business processes and practices commonly employed within their area of specialization.

Student Learning Outcomes for the M.A. in Music Industry Studies

  1. Obtain knowledge and identification of facts, terms, concepts, principles and theories within the Music Industry.
  2. Justify the purpose, importance, and critical function of copyright within the Music Industry.
  3. Demonstrate professional competence and intellectual rigor in the execution of business practices and procedures common to the Music Industry.
  4. Develop interpersonal skills and leadership qualities necessary for effectiveness in mixed artistic and non-artistic team-based business environments.
  5. Develop interdisciplinary skills and entrepreneurial qualities necessary for career effectiveness within an evolving global Music Industry.
  6. Recognize the importance of remaining both inquisitive and adaptable as the Music Industry continues to evolve.
  7. Demonstrate the principles of exceptional character and assess the advantages, to both the individual and Music Industry alike, of incorporating them into one’s personality.

Nursing (Effective Summer 2011, formerly an option under Health Science)

  1. Use nursing systems to promote health and prevent disease & injury among diverse communities, families, and individuals across the life span.
  2. Translate current, best evidence into practice that meets professional standards.
  3. Demonstrate competence in information management and patient care technology.
  4. Function collaboratively as a member within an inter-professional healthcare community to improve health outcomes.
  5. Provide direct and indirect care within legal and ethical professional standards.
  6. Demonstrate leadership skills in providing safe, quality, patient-centered care to individuals, families, groups, communities and populations.
  7. Serve as a patient advocate locally, nationally, and globally.
  8. Demonstrate characteristics of a life-long learner.

Philosophy

B.A., Philosophy

  1. Students will develop a critical understanding of the work of central thinkers in the Western philosophical tradition.
  2. Students will read and comprehend philosophical texts.
  3. Students will respond critically and analytically to philosophical positions, arguments, and methodologies, including positions, arguments, and methodologies involved in the investigation of significant issues in epistemology, metaphysics, and value theory.
  4. Students will defend their own philosophical positions and arguments.
  5. Students will write well-organized philosophical essays in which they clearly articulate philosophical positions and arguments.
  6. Students will write well-organized philosophical essays in which they clearly and effectively present and defend their own philosophical positions and arguments.
  7. Students will apply the basic concepts essential to a critical examination and evaluation of argumentative discourse, where this includes learning how to determine whether an argument is valid and whether it is sound.

Physical Therapy, Doctor of Physical therapy (DPT)

The Student Learning Objectives for out DPT program are:

  1.  Demonstrate comprehension of the foundational sciences of anatomy, physiology, neurology, and pathology for application to the physical therapy clinical setting.
  2.  Communicate in a professional manner to a diverse population in classroom activities and in clinical settings.
  3.  Practice in an independent and interdependent role in providing physical therapy services.
  4.  Practice as a reflective and competent clinician whose clinical decision making skills are guided by ethical practice standards.
  5.  Apply the principles of evidence-based practice to clinical decision making.
  6.  Analyze the research literature; formulate an expert clinical opinion on physical therapy practice.

Physics and Astronomy

1. Physics: Students will be able to describe natural phenomena in general and in their chosen program option using principles of physics

2. Scientific methods: Students will be able to

a. Set up laboratory experiments and collect data from observations and experiments

b. Combine insights and techniques from the various courses in the program (integrate knowledge)

c. Derive quantitative predictions from a model through mathematical analysis

d. Analyze data, provide error analysis, and test a model or hypothesis by comparing with data

e. Competently use computer tools, including: software programs for data analysis and presentation, numerical analysis, and computer simulations.

3. Communication:  Students will be able to

a. Convey physical concepts with mathematical expressions (quantitative literacy)

b. Clearly communicate physical concepts, findings, and interpretations through oral presentations (oral communication)

c. Write clear, organized and illustrated technical reports with proper references to previous work in the area (written communication)

d. Search for and read scientific literature (information literacy)

4. Responsibility & Ethics: Students will be able to

a. Make unbiased and objective judgments of theories and experiments

b. Maintain integrity in their research and adhere to ethical principles regarding plagiarism, data collection and selective data sampling

c. Give proper attribution

d. Practice lab safety

Political Science

  1. Professional Interaction and Effective Communication - Students will demonstrate persuasive and rhetorical communication skills for strong oral and written communication in small and large groups.
  2. Develop a Global Perspective - Students will demonstrate knowledge and theories relevant to global politics and policies. This includes knowledge of Western and non-Western political systems, processes, values and models of politics and patterns of interaction among them. Students will demonstrate an understanding and respect for economic, socio-cultural, political and environmental interaction of global life.
  3. Active Citizenship and Civic Engagement -Students will demonstrate a knowledge and awareness of contemporary issues, political institutions, and problems in the community and their historical contexts. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the importance of community involvement and leadership.
  4. Critical Thinking - Students will demonstrate increasingly sophisticated skills in reading primary sources critically. Students will be able to research and evaluate the models, methods, and analyses of others in the field of Political Science, and critically integrate and evaluate others' work.
  5. Political Decision Making- Students will demonstrate an in-depth understanding and knowledge of the political institutions through which public policies are formulated, modified, and implemented.
  6. Political Analytical Skills - Students will demonstrate a working knowledge of research designs, hypothesis formulation, measurement of variables, data collection, and analysis.

Psychology

B.A. Psychology

Student Learning Outcomes of the Undergraduate Program

Goal 1.Knowledge Base in Psychology
Students should demonstrate fundamental knowledge and comprehension of the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, historical trends, and empirical findings to discuss how psychological principles apply to behavioral problems. Students completing foundation courses should demonstrate breadth of their knowledge and application of psychological ideas to simple problems; students completing a baccalaureate degree should show depth in their knowledge and application of psychological concepts and frameworks to problems of greater complexity.

1.1 Describe key concepts, principles, and overarching themes in psychology
1.2 Develop a working knowledge of psychology’s content domains
1.3 Describe applications of psychology 

Goal 2. Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking
The skills in this domain involve the development of scientific reasoning and problem solving, including effective research methods. Students completing foundation-level courses should learn basic skills and concepts in interpreting behavior, studying research, and applying research design principles to drawing conclusions about psychological phenomena; students completing a baccalaureate degree should focus on theory use as well as designing and executing research plans.

2.1 Use scientific reasoning to interpret psychological phenomena
2.2 Demonstrate psychology information literacy
2.3 Engage in innovative and integrative thinking and problem solving
2.4 Interpret, design, and conduct basic psychological research
2.5 Incorporate sociocultural factors in scientific inquiry 

Goal 3. Ethical and Social Responsibilities in a Diverse World
The skills in this domain involve the development of ethically and socially responsible behaviors for professional and personal settings in a landscape that involves increasing diversity. Students completing foundation-level courses should become familiar with the formal regulations that govern professional ethics in psychology and begin to embrace the values that will contribute to positive outcomes in work settings and in building a society responsive to multicultural and global concerns. Students completing a baccalaureate degree should have more direct opportunities to demonstrate adherence to professional values that will help them optimize their contributions and work effectively, even with those who do not share their heritage and traditions. This domain also promotes the adoption of personal and professional values that can strengthen community relationships and contributions.

3.1 Apply ethical standards to evaluate psychological science and practice
3.2 Build and enhance interpersonal relationships
3.3 Adopt values that build community at local, national, and global levels 

Goal 4. Communication
Students should demonstrate competence
 in writing and in oral and interpersonal communication skills. Students completing foundation-level courses should write a cogent scientific argument, present information using a scientific approach, engage in discussion of psychological concepts, explain the ideas of others, and express their own ideas with clarity. Students completing a baccalaureate degree should produce a research study or other psychological project, explain scientific results, and present information to a professional audience. They should also develop flexible interpersonal approaches that optimize information exchange and relationship development.

4.1 Demonstrate effective writing for different purposes
4.2 Exhibit effective presentation skills for different purposes
4.3 Interact effectively with others 

Goal 5. Professional Development
The emphasis in this goal is on application
of psychology-specific content and skills, effective self-reflection, project-management skills, teamwork skills, and career preparation. Foundation-level outcomes concentrate on the development of work habits and ethics to succeed in academic settings. The skills in this goal at the baccalaureate level refer to abilities that sharpen student readiness for post-baccalaureate employment, graduate school, or professional school. These skills can be developed and refined both in traditional academic settings and in extracurricular involvement. In addition, career professionals can be enlisted to support occupational planning and pursuit. This emerging emphasis should not be construed as obligating psychology programs to obtain employment for their graduates but instead as encouraging programs to optimize the competitiveness of their graduates for securing places in the workforce.

5.1 Apply psychological content and skills to career goals
5.2 Exhibit self-efficacy and self-regulation
5.3 Refine project-management skills

5.4 Enhance teamwork capacity
5.5 Develop meaningful professional direction for life after graduation

Public Administration, Master of (MPA)

  1. Acquire a sophisticated and thorough understanding of the unique challenges obligations and opportunities of public sector administration in a diverse dynamic urban context.
  2. Develop a foundation of financial management skills required to critically calibrate analyze develop implement and manage budgets and resources in the public sector in an open and ethical manner.
  3. Develop the foundational skills and abilities needed to address the essential issues of human resources management to build a strong and effective team in the public sector through effective recruitment that results in sound hiring retention techniques staff development performance evaluation and improvement progressive discipline and appropriate termination procedures.

Collective Decision-Making Skills:

  1. Develop the skills and theoretical knowledge needed not only to redesign public sector organizations and staff and delivery systems but also to foster cooperation and collaboration across unit lines and with both internal and external community partners.

Community and Cultural Skills:

  1. Acquire an appreciation of civic engagement first through transition from personal development to the recognition that every decision has impact on the community.
  2. Develop skills to competently incorporate policy decisions affecting community issues.
  3. Understand the importance of service as a catalyst to the improvement of civic life in the public and not-for-profit organizational settings.

Synthesis Skills:

  1. Develop advanced communication skills essential for leadership in the public sector.
  2. Develop strong oral communication skills both in small groups and in larger public contexts.
  3. Develop strong written communication skills appropriate to write reports explain issues and policies persuasively present initiatives and correspond with colleagues and clients.

Public Health Program, B.S.

Students in Public Health Program will accomplish the Seven Areas of Responsibilities as stated by NCHEC:

  1. Assess Needs, Assets and Capacity for Health Education
  2. Plan Health Education
  3. Implement Health Education
  4. Conduct Evaluation and Research Related to Health Education
  5. Administer and Manage Health Education
  6. Serve as a Health Education Resource Person
  7. Communicate and Advocate for Health and Health Education

Public Sector Management

  1. Communicate both orally and in written format in a clear succinct and persuasive manner public policy observations interpretations and ideas
  2. Analyze an issue and its causes and within the public policy process form implement and assess the effectiveness of appropriate strategies.
  3. Effectively articulate the mission and goals of their organizations aligning resources priorities and plans in support of those ideals
  4. Utilize effective management strategies and tools to deal with the social phenomena and challenges confronting the public sector
  5. Form alliances and connections across cultural boundaries uniting diverse perspectives into a common purpose for improvement within the organization and the community
  6. Succeed in supervisory/managerial roles leading by example to enhance work performance and accurately assessing agency and employee needs
  7. Managing conflict effectively encouraging a variety of ideas and opinions to guide others to reach consensus
  8. Ethically face issues and maintain the public trust

Radiologic Sciences, B.S. (Effective Fall 2011, formerly an option under Health Science)

Graduates of the Radiologic Sciences Program will:

  1. Demonstrate a mastery of basic radiographic medical-imaging skills and advanced medical imaging skills in MRI, CT, and Interventional Radiography.
  2. Demonstrate effective communication skills that provide compassionate and age appropriate patient care.
  3. Demonstrate problem-solving/critical thinking skills that provide ethical and safe patient care.
  4. Demonstrate the value of professional development for patient care and medical imaging through life-long learning that meet the needs of the medical imaging community.
  5. Maintain program effectiveness through continual assessment.

Recreation and Tourism Management

B.S Tourism, Hospitality, and Recreation Management 

  1. Students will demonstrate critical thinking including analysis, synthesis and evaluation in the fields of play, leisure, recreation, parks and/or tourism through a variety of pedagogies.
  2. Students will practice and self-assess progress toward mastery of the standards and competencies of appropriate accrediting bodies through continual self-assessment and portfolio development.
  3. Students will demonstrate application and integration of theoretical knowledge in a practical setting through 600 hours of professional internship in preparation for pursuing employment.
  4. Students will demonstrate an increase in Emotional Intelligence while pursuing their degree(s) objectives as measured by an Emotional Intelligence survey instrument at point of entry and exit from the degree program.

M.S Tourism, Hospitality, and Recreation Management 

  1. Demonstrate critical thinking, including analysis,synthesis, and evaluation within the recreation, hospitality, and/or tourism industry (ies)through a variety of pedagogies.
  2. Apply knowledge of the economic, environmental,cultural and social impacts of hospitality, tourism, and/or recreation experience to real world settings or problems.
  3.  Obtain theoretical knowledge and practical skills in preparation for a career in the tourism, hospitality, and/or recreation industry(ies) as demonstrated by satisfactory completion of research projects, coursework, and internships. 

Religious Studies

  1. Ability to interpret texts and other cultural phenomena that have religious presuppositions or implications (such as rituals, texts, architecture) in their historical, social, and political context.
  2. Think both empathetically and critically about conflicting religious claims.
  3. Acquire knowledge of the history of more than one major religious tradition.
  4. Apply intercultural methods to religious inquiry and analysis, and
  5. Articulate a perception of one’s role in society, in both career and public service options.

Social Work

The Social Work Department is required by our national accrediting body, the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE), to operationalize the following 9 competencies twice: once for our foundation year and once for our concentration year. CSWE uses the terminology competencies in place of the CSUN wording of SLOs or student learning outcomes. 

Competencies effective 2015-2016: 

  • Competency 1–Demonstrate Ethical and Professional Behavior
  • Competency 2 –Engage Diversity and Difference in Practice
  • Competency 3 –Advance Human Rights and Social, Economic, and Environmental Justice
  • Competency 4 –Engage In Practice-informed Research and Research-informed Practice
  • Competency 5 –Engage in Policy Practice
  • Competency 6 –Engage with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities
  • Competency 7 –Assess Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities  
  • Competency 8 –Intervene with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities
  • Competency 9 –Evaluate Practice with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities

Sociology

Students will achieve the following:

  1. Students will be able to recall and comprehend concepts, principles, theories, and knowledge in the field of Sociology and as related to their particular option.
  2. Students will be able to recall and interpret common statistics used in Sociology utilizing computer printout.
  3. Students will be able to apply critical thinking skills to answer questions about social phenomena.
  4. Students will demonstrate the ability to collect, process, and interpret research data.
  5. Students will demonstrate the ability to link theory with observation using research methodologies.
  6. Alumni will acknowledge the use of their sociological knowledge in graduate school, their workplace, and their personal life.
  7. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the diverse nature of groups in society and their relevance to cross-cultural and global issues.

Theatre

B.A Theatre

  1. Students will demonstrate the knowledge and skills inherent to the varied and distinct processes of theatrical development and presentation.
  2. Students will apply essential knowledge and skills through participation in theatrical projects.
  3. Students will demonstrate understanding of the relevant contexts in which theatre is created and presented.
  4. Students will formulate and articulate critical analyses and evaluations of theatrical works.     
  5. Students will develop the intrapersonal and interpersonal skills essential to collaboration.

M.A Theatre

  1. Develop competent research skills.
  2. Develop competent critical thinking and writing abilities.
  3. Develop competent knowledge of world theatre history, literature and criticism.
  4. Demonstrate abilities to apply and integrate skills and knowledge into their professional development.
  1. Students will demonstrate the knowledge and skills inherent to the varied and distinct processes of theatrical development and presentation.

Urban Studies and Planning

B.A Urban Studies and Planning

  1. Students are expected to know the key forces responsible for urban development in the U.S. and elsewhere in the world.
  2. Students are expected to demonstrate knowledge of current principles and practices of urban planning relevant at multiple levels of government from local to global.
  3. Students are expected to demonstrate the ability to work with diverse communities to advance social justice.
  4. Students are expected to demonstrate knowledge of appropriate methods and techniques to accomplish urban-related research.
  5. Students are expected to demonstrate an ability to apply principles of sustainable development using a participatory approach to decision making.
  6. Students are expected to participate in various forms of civic engagement.

 

Master of Urban Planning (MUP)

Principles,Theory, and History

Graduates will know the basic principles, applicable theory and history of urban planning as it is practiced in the United States and more specifically in the State of California. This will include the ability to contextualize the economic,social and political factors which affect and often dictate urban planning practice at the local and regional level. 

  1. Explain the basic principles and techniques of urban planning research and practice from U.S perspective.
  2. Describe principles of urban planning and their application.
  3. Describe the principles and applied aspects of sustainable development.
  4. Explain economic and social factors affecting urban planning.

Methods and Techniques 

Graduates will understand and utilize key methods utilized in urban planning research and practice. These will include the use of quantitative data and its analysis, qualitative research techniques and the application of techniques to a field research project in urban planning. Graduates will also learn the use of visual communication tools needed for data gathering, its analysis and its eventual presentation in graphic format.

  1. Devise and carry out the fieldwork required to plan effectively.
  2. Demonstrate a plan of action to engage communities in the definition of their planning interests and concerns.
  3. Explain the importance of negotiation in the planning process and provide hypothetical strategies.

Professional Practice 

Graduates will understand the key elements of professional planning practice, including comprehensive planning and the creation and updating of the General Plan: the function and practice of zoning; the role of specific plans, community plans and special overlay districts; the use of environmental impact analysis in planning and specifically the role of the California Environmental Quality Act; the role of politics and negotiation in the planning process; and the ethical responsibilities of planners in the exercise of their professional responsibilities. Graduates will also demonstrate the ability to conduct a field project using applicable research techniques to address a practical planning problem in a local community. Finally, all graduates will successfully complete a capstone project, which will validate their understanding and ability to produce a professional planning documents and reports.

  1. Explain the content of comprehensive plans and zoning.
  2. Explain the content of environmental impact analysis and its role in environmental decision-making.
  3. Apply the most current tools used to create, implement, and monitor comprehensive plans and zoning.
  4. Describe regulatory approaches in the United States, which are regulatory approaches in the United States, which are directly transferable, to an international context.
  5. Demonstrate vision and leadership skills.
  6. Integrate environmental and social aspects of planning with management practices.