Math 150A Calculus I

  Spring 2017



Overview: Some parts of  calculus were understood by ancient Chinese, Japanese, African (Egyptian), Arab, and Greek mathematicians.  Calculus in its modern form was developed independently by Isaac Newton and Gottfried Leibnitz in the 17th century.  It has been further developed by many mathematicians and scientists throughout the world.  Calculus may be understood as the mathematics of infinitesimal quantities ("infinitely small" quantities) especially in relation to their cumulative effects and to rates of change, such as velocity.  These concepts will be made concrete as the course progresses. The applications of calculus are ubiquitous in modern science, engineering, statistics, and other disciplines.

Course Objectives: Introduction to Calculus for mathematics, physical science, and engineering majors. Formal, graphical, and computational aspects of limits, continuity, and derivatives. Applications of differentiation including graphing and optimization. Definite and indefinite integrals, Riemann sums, the mean value theorems and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Applications of integration to area, volumes of revolution, surface area, arclength, and work. Derivatives of inverse functions, and the natural logarithm and exponential functions.



Instructor
David Klein
Santa Susana Hall,  Room 127  
Phone: (818) 677-7792
email: david.klein@csun.edu, web page: www.csun.edu/~vcmth00m

Class Meetings             
MTuTh 3:30 to 4:55 p.m.
Chaparral Hall 5114

Office hours
MW 2 to 3 p.m. & by Appointment
Prerequisites          

25 on MPT I and 22 in MPT II or C-in MATH 104 or C- in MATH 105. Students with less than 30 on MPT I or 28 on MPT II or B- in MATH 104 or B- in MATH 105 must also be concurrently enrolled in Math 150AL.

Grading
There will be two midterm exams, one final exam, and several 20 minute quizzes.  The final exam will be cumulative and will count for 30% of your grade. Each midterm will be worth 100 points, each quiz will be worth 30 points. The dates of all tests and quizzes will be announced in class.  Plus grades (+) and minus grades (–) will be assigned.  Class participation will resolve boderline cases.

Final Exam: Saturday, May 13, 2017, 11:30AM - 1:30PM 

Homework
Practice problems will be assigned
 
Textbook

Calculus, 2nd edition by Briggs et al, Sections 2.2-2.7, 3.1-4.9, 4.1-4.6, 4.9, 5.1-5.5, 6.2-6.7, 7.1-7.2

Calculators

Calculators are not permitted for any quiz or exam in this course.  Also not allowed are cell phones, electronic devices, or headware (except for religious purposes).


Assignments and Practice Problems


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In addition to the assignments below, valuable extra practice problems are available to you for free from CSUN's Math Moodle (not to be confused with CSUN Moodle).   To access them, all you need is your CSUN User I.D. (which is not the same as your CSUN email I.D.).  These Webwork problems are available here:  http://mathweb.sandbox.csun.edu/moodle1/course/view.php?id=53.  Then click on the Math 150a course taught by David Klein.
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Problem sets from the textbook for the semester are posted below. Quiz and test dates will be posted later.  For online access to problem sets go to:  mymathlab.com, Use the access code for this class: klein29873

Problems:

Sect. 2.2) Limits. 7-10, 21-24, 28-31, 36-38, 43-44.
Sect. 2.3) Computing Limits. 11-16, 17-24, 25-32, 33-37, 39-42, 45-52, 53-56, 57, 59-64.
Sect. 2.4) Infinite Limits. 8-12, 15-16, 17-28, 29-34, 35-38.
Sect. 2.5) Limits at Infinity. 9-14, 25-34, 41-43, 46-47, 56-57, 58-59.
Sect. 2.6) Continuity. 9-12, 17-20, 21-24, 31-34, 51-54, 57-62, 80-81, 91-92.
Sect. 2.7) Precise Definition. 9-12, 19-24, 34, 35, 37.

Quiz 1: Sections 2.2 to 2.7, Thursday, Feb 9

Sect. 3.1) Introducing the Derivative. 19-26, 27-36, 49-52, 57-58, 60.
Sect. 3.2) Working with Derivatives. 5-6, 7-9, 10-14, 15-16.
Sect. 3.3) Rules of Differentiation. 19-34, 35-38, 39-43, 44-48, 61-63.
Sect. 3.4) Product and Quotient Rules. 7-14, 15-18, 19-27, 29-32, 33-35.
Sect. 3.5) Trigonometric Functions. 7-14, 17-28, 29-31, 32-40, 41-46, 62-65.
Sect. 3.6) Rates of Change. 11-15.
Sect. 3.7) Chain Rule. 7-18, 19-24, 45-46, 57-68, 71-73, 79-83.
Sect. 3.8) Implicit Differentiation. 5-22, 25-30, 55-59, 72-74.

Quiz 2: Sections 3.1 to 3.8, Thursday, Feb 23
 
Sect. 3.9) Related Rates. 5-25, 27-35, 37-39, 50-51, 53-54.

Sect. 4.1) Maxima and Minima. 11-18, 35-46, 47-49, 52-57.
Sect. 4.2) Concavity Etc. 11-14, 25-34, 35-42, 47-50, 51-62, 63-70.
Sect. 4.3) Graphing Functions. 7-8, 9-32.
Sect. 4.4) Optimization. 5, 7-17, 19-20, 24-26, 29-30, 32.
Sect. 4.5) Linear Approximation. 15-20, 21-30, 35-38, 50-53.
Sect. 4.6) Mean Value Theorem. 7-14, 15-16, 17-24, 33-35, 39-40.

Quizzes 3 & 4: Graphing (quiz 3); Sections 3.9, 4.1 & 4.4 - 4.6 (quiz 4), Thursday, March 16

Sect. 4.9) Antiderivatives. 21-34, 35-40, 51-56, 63-72, 75-78.

Sect. 5.1) Approximating Areas. 19-26, 41, 42.
Sect. 5.2) Definite Integrals. 19-22, 23-30, 31-38, 41-44, 45-50, 65, 70-73.
Sect. 5.3) Fundamental Thm of Calc. 11-17, 29-47, 53-58, 59-66, 95-100.
Sect. 5.4) Working with Integrals. 7-16, 17-20, 21-28, 33-38, 40-42.
Sect. 5.5) Substitution. 17-32, 33-38, 39-52, 62-76, 77-80.

Exam 1: Chapters 2, 3, 4 through Section 4.6, Thursday, April 6

Sect. 6.2) Regions Between Curves. 9-14, 15, 17-20, 23, 25-26.
Sect. 6.3) Volume by Slicing. 7-12, 17-24, 25-32, 34-38, 43-49.
Sect. 6.4) Volume by Shells. 5-14, 15-24, 25-29, 31-34, 51-58, 60-62, 65.

Quiz 5: Sections 5.3 to 6.4, Thursday, April 27

Sect. 6.5) Arclength. 3-6, 7-16.
Sect. 6.6) Surface Area. 5-14, 15-16, 17-20.
Sect. 6.7) Work. 17-26, 51-52, 55, 57-58.

Sect. 7.1) Inverse Functions. 39-44, 45-48, 49-52, 53-54.
Sect. 7.2) Logs and Exponentials. 7-20, 21-30, 31-38, 41-50, 51-58, 68-78, 79-88, 90-91, 92-93.

Exam 2: Monday, May 8

Final Exam: Saturday, May 13, 2017, 11:30AM - 1:30PM

Student behavior, academic dishonesty, university policies

Please arrive on time and avoid leaving early.  No text messaging.  Cell phones should be turned off during class and all exams and quizzes.  Seats may be reassigned during exams, and you must leave your ID on top of the desk.  You will need to turn in an exam or quiz if you leave the room, so go to the bathroom beforehand.  Academic Dishonesty is covered in Appendix C of the CSUN catalog. Academic dishonesty will be reported to the Office of Student Affairs.  For information about CSUN's policy for academic dishonesty, see:  http://www.csun.edu/catalog/policies/academic-dishonesty/

Note also that according to CSUN policy, a grade that is sanctioned due to academic dishonesty cannot be replaced by subsequent course grades:
http://www.csun.edu/catalog/policies/repeating-courses-grade-forgiveness-undergraduate/

Drop Dates

Students can drop this course online by February 10.  From February 13 to 17, students can still drop with signed approval from the Math Department.


This syllabus is subject to change during the semester.  Any changes will be posted here and announced in class.