Art Deco —After World War I
(Postcubist pictorial modernism)

 

  • after World War I, cubist ideas inspired a new direction in pictorial images

  • referred to as art deco: a term used to identify popular geometric works of the 1920s and 1930s.

  • Streamlining, zigzag, and decorative geometry were used to express the modern era of the machine while still satisfying a passion for decoration that carried over from art nouveau.

  • Edward McKnight Kauffer and
    A. M. Cassandre played major roles in defining this new approach.

 

 

  • The term art deco identifies the geometric works of the 1920's and 1930's (between the two World Wars).

  • Designers & advertisers realized that the middle class needed an alternative to the abstract Modernism.

  • Influenced by Art Nouveau, Cubism, the Bauhaus, the Vienna Secession, de Stijl, Suprematism.

  • Art Deco ornaments included Egyptian ziggurats, sunbursts, lightening bolts and the zigzags. It came to symbolize both efficient modern living and an elegant lifestyle.

     

 

14-37

Poster for the Daily Herald (1918)
E. McKnight Kauffer

 

  • Kauffer's famous 1918 Daily Herald poster showed how the spatial organization and synthetic imagery of cubism could be used with strong communications impact in graphic design.

 

14-37 —————————14-38 —————————14-39

London Underground posters
E. McKnight Kauffer

 

14-42

Poster for Paris newspaper L'Intransigeant (1925)
A. M. Cassandre

 

  •   A. M. Cassandre had an exceptional ability to integrate powerful symbolic images and hand-drawn, sans-serif lettering to achieve a unified composition and concise message, as in this poster for a Paris newspaper L'Intransigent.

 

14-43

Poster for North Star Paris-to-Amsterdam night train (1927)
A. M. Cassandre

 

14-45

Poster for the ocean liner L'Atlantique (1931)
A. M. Cassandre

 

 

 

14-46

Poster for Dubonnet (1932)
A. M. Cassandre

 

DUBO (doubt): the man eyes his glass uncertainly; DU BON (of some good): the beverage is tasted; and DUBONNET: the product is identified as the glass is refilled.

 

 

 

14-48, 14-49

Typefaces
created by

A. M. Cassandre

 

Cassandre designed typefaces for the Deberny & Peignot type foundry, including Bifur, Acier Noir, and Peignot.

 

 

14-50

Vanity Fair cover (1930)
Jean Carlu

 

 

14-51

Travel poster for Paris (1935)
Paul Colin

 

14-52

Poster for the Southern Railway (undated)
Austin Cooper

 

Cubist rhetoric operates symbolically for mass communications, with fragments and glimpses of a Paris trip.

 

14-53 — — — — — — — 14-54

Posters for the London Underground (1924)
Austin Cooper

 

 

14-55

Poster for the Vienna Music and Theater Festival (1924)
Joseph Binder

 

 

14-56

Cinema poster for Metropolis (1926)
Schulz-Neudamm

 

 

14-35

Concert Poster (1938)
Ludwig Hohlwein

 

A Teutonic she-warrior looms upward, thanks to a low viewpoint and a light source striking her from below.