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Role-Playing Exercises
Developed by Ian Barnard and Elizabeth Kessler


A

You are teaching a class at CSUN. Most of your students are planning on earning teaching credentials. In class you discuss the importance of anti-homophobic pedagogy. One of your white students tells the class that homosexuality is against her religion, and that she has no intention of implementing an anti-homophobic pedagogy when she begins teaching high school.

Characters (4):

CSUN instructor, CSUN student, 2 classmates



B

You are a high school teacher. In class you are discussing famous lesbians throughout history. One of the students in the class asks you if you are a lesbian.


Characters (4):

High school teacher, high school student, 2 classmates



C

You are a high school teacher. One of your students, whom you think is gay, is acting up in class. The student is smart but is failing the course. You notice that he gets teased a lot by the other students. You're not sure if his poor behavior and academic performance in class are related to his sexuality or other students' treatment of him.


Characters (4):

High school teacher, high school student, 2 invisible observers





D

You are a CSUN student in an English Department class on African Literatures. You are US American. Most of the students in the class are future secondary school teachers. Your CSUN professor has invited a distinguished African scholar to be a guest lecturer in the class. After the guest lecture, you ask the guest speaker a question about lesbians and gay men in Africa. The guest lecturer responds, "We don't have that problem in Africa."


Characters (4):

CSUN professor, CSUN student, guest speaker, classmate





E

You are a student in a class at CSUN. Most of the students in the class are Liberal Studies majors and are preparing to teach elementary school. The gay male professor is talking about lesbian and gay identities. You are bisexual. You ask a question about bisexuality. The professor responds that there is no such thing as bisexuality: bisexuals are either gay people who are in the closet or straight people trying to be hip.


Characters (4):

CSUN professor, CSUN student, classmates (2)





F

You are a student in a class at CSUN. Most of the students in the class are Liberal Studies majors and are preparing to teach elementary school. The gay male professor is talking about lesbian and gay identities. You ask a question about bisexuality (you are not bisexual yourself). The professor responds that there is no such thing as bisexuality: bisexuals are either gay people who are in the closet or straight people trying to be hip.


Characters (4):

CSUN professor, CSUN student, classmates (2)





G

You are a student in a high school English class. You have done extensive independent research on Oscar Wilde/James Baldwin (choose one) and look forward to the unit on this author's work. When your teacher doesn't say anything about the author's sexuality, you ask a question in class about the significance of the author's sexuality . The teacher responds that this isn't a human sexuality class, and that a writer's sexual orientation doesn't have anything to do with literature.


Characters (4):

High school student, high school English teacher, classmates (2)





H

You are teaching a first year composition course at CSUN. The class is having a lively and insightful discussion about the representation of gay men in Queer Eye for the Straight Guy. You are impressed with how comfortable students seem talking about queer issues, and with how readily they accept the topic as a legitimate arena of academic inquiry.


Characters (4):

CSUN instructor, CSUN students (3)





I

You are teaching a first year composition course at CSUN. The class is having a lively and insightful discussion about the representation of gay men in Queer Eye for the Straight Guy. You are impressed with how comfortable students seem talking about queer issues, and with how readily they accept the topic as a legitimate arena of academic inquiry. However, one student in the class is silent, seems very embarrassed by the discussion, and is constantly looking down.


Characters (4):

CSUN instructor, silent student, classmates (2)




J

You are a high school teacher. One of your new students, Rose, looks like a "boy." Rose asks you where the restroom is. Will you direct Rose to the boys' restroom or the girls' restroom? Or will you do something else? And will you say anything else to Rose when you respond to Rose's question?


Characters (4):

High school teacher, Rose, 2 invisible observers




K

You are teaching Leslie Feinberg's book Transgender Warriors in your developmental writing class at CSUN. One of your students asks if they should refer to Feinberg as "she" or "he."


Characters (4):

CSUN professor, CSUN student, classmates (2)



L

You are a gay Chicano student at CSUN, taking a course in Chicana/o Studies. When the topic of queer Chicanas/Chicanos comes up, one of the straight Chicano students in the class says that gayness is a luxury for white people and that we Chicanos need to stick together to fight our main enemy, racism.


Characters (7):

CSUN instructor, gay Chicano student, straight Chicano student, gay white student, straight white student, bisexual African-American student, straight Chicana student.




M

You are a middle school teacher who identifies as transgender, not as male or female. Your school administration gives you a survey to fill out. One of the questions asks you to check your gender. There are two boxes: Male, Female.


Characters (4):

Middle school teacher, survey developer, 2 invisible observers





N

You are a middle school teacher who identifies as male, but you have read a lot of queer theory and are conscientized about transgender issues. Your school administration gives you a survey to fill out. One of the questions asks you to check your gender. There are two boxes: Male, Female.


Characters (4):

Middle school teacher, survey developer, 2 invisible observers

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