September 23, 2002 Vol. VII, No. 3



Back to School Facts and Figures for the Nation

Rewards of Staying in School

$4.4 million is the estimated lifetime earnings of professional degree holders in 1999 dollars. This compares with $3.4 million for those with doctoral degrees, $2.5 million for master's degree-holders, $2.1 million for those with a bachelor's, $1.2 million for high school graduates and $1 million for high school dropouts.

$50,367 is the average starting salary offer in 2000 for bachelor's degree candidates in petroleum engineering, among the highest of any field of study. At the other end of the range, those majoring in the social sciences (excluding economics) were offered an average of $30,933.

Graduation

80 percent is the share of the nation's adults 25 and older with at least a high school diploma in Census 2000. The corresponding rate in the 1990 Census was 75 percent.

24 percent is the share of the nation's adults 25 and older with at least a bachelor's degree in Census 2000. The corresponding rate in the 1990 Census was 20 percent.

Cost of College

$8,912 is the average amount charged for tuition, room and board for in-state students at the nation's four-year public colleges and universities during 1999-2000.

$26,532 is the average charged for tuition, room and board at the nation's four-year private colleges and universities during 1999-2000.

Teachers

6.3 million is the number of U.S. teachers, from pre-kindergarten to college, as of 2000.

$52,200 is the average salary paid to public school teachers in New Jersey for 1999-2000, the highest of any state in the nation. The national average was $41,700.

Students

76.6 million is the number of U.S. residents enrolled in school-from nursery school to college-on Census Day, April 1, 2000. Students account for more than one in four of all U.S. residents.

49 million is the number of students enrolled in elementary and high school in October 2000, which matched the previous record set in 1970 when "baby boom" children expanded school enrollments.

10 million is the number of traditional college-age students (those under 25) in October 2000.

6 million is the number of students age 25 and older enrolled in college in October 2000. These older students accounted for 37 percent of all college students.

56 percent is the share of women college students in October 2000. Thus women maintained the majority status they have held since 1979.


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