Tube Feeding Tutorial Quiz

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1. When should a tube feeding be recommended?

When a person has an inadequate oral nutrient intake for 2 - 4 days.
When a person has severe diarrhea.
When GI tract works, but patient cannot meet nutrient needs orally.
When a person has severe acute pancreatitis.
When a person has severe dysphagia.

2. How do enteral and parenteral nutrition differ?

Enteral is administered via a vein; parenteral via the ilium.
Enteral is administered via a blood vessel; parenteral via the mouth.
Parenteral is administered via GI tract; enteral via a site outside the GI tract.
Enteral is administered via the GI tract; parenteral via a site outside the GI tract.
Enteral is administered via the stomach; parenteral via the small intestine.

3. Which of the following are contra-indications for tube feedings?

Hypomotility of the small intestine.
Functioning GI tract, but patient cannot meet nutritional needs orally.
Severe Dysphagia.
Low output GI fistulas.
Protein energy malnutrition.

4. When is a tube feeding not warranted?

When the person is in shock.
When aggressive nutritional therapy is not appropriate.
When the person cannot meet nutritional needs orally.
When the person has severe dysphagia.
When the person is comatose and has a functioning GI tract.
First and second selections only.

5. What is/are the location(s) for transnasal tube feedings?

Jejunum.
Duodenum.
Stomach.
Esophagus.
Ileum.
First three selections.

6. When should a feeding ostomy be considered?

When a tube can't be passed through the nose.
When there is a blockage in the esophagus.
When long term tube feeding is required.
When short-term TF is required.
When a patient requests an ostomy.
First three selections only.

7. What is/are the location(s) for tube feeding ostomies?

Esophagus.
Jejunum.
Stomach.
Duodenum.
Ileum.
First three selections.

8. Complications of a TF into the stomach include:

Regurgitation.
Aspiration pneumonia.
Ulcer.
Gastric atrophy.
Edema.
First two selections only.

9. Complications of tube feedings into the intestines include:

Diarrhea.
Dehydration.
High blood pressure.
Constipation.
Jaundice.
First two selections only.

10. What diameter tube should be used for a tube feeding?

The smallest diameter through which the formula barely moves.
The smallest diameter through with the enteral formula freely flows.
A medium diameter.
The largest possible diameter .

11. What is/are the basic enteral formula type(s)?

Intact.
Modular.
Hydrolyzed.
Dehydrated.
Freeze-dried.
First three selections.

12. A polymeric formula is used when the person cannot digest intact nutrients adequately or when a small absorptive area is available

True.
False.

13. A modular formula is used when the person has specific nutrient needs that need to be individualized

True.
False.

14. A monomeric formula is used when the person is able to digest and absorb adequately

True.
False.

15. Which of the following enteral formula has little residue?

Modular.
Hydrolyzed.
Polymeric.
Fiber supplemented.

16. What are the benefits of enteral formulas with fiber?

Fiber provides fuel to the cells of the colon lining.
Fiber helps maintain normal bowel function.
Fiber prevents clogging of a feeding tube.
Fiber aids in the absorption of minerals.
First twoselections.

17. How many kcals/ml do most intact enteral formulas contain?

7 kcalories per mL.
5 kcalorie per mL.
2 kcalories per mL.
1 kcalorie per mL.
3 kcalories per mL.

18. One milliliter is equal to . . .

10 cc.
5cc.
1 cc.
4cc.
100 cc.

19. Which formula can be beneficial for trauma patients?

Fiber-containing formulas.
Low protein formulas.
Glutamine-supplemented formulas.
Carbohydrate-controlled formulas.

20. Which formula can be beneficial for patients with compromised pulmonary function?

Fiber-containing formulas.
Low protein formulas.
Glutamine-supplemented formulas.
Carbohydrate-controlled formulas.

21. What is the approximate osmolality of body fluid?

500 mOsm.
400 mOsm.
100 mOsm.
300 mOsm.
200 mOsm.

22. What is/are the potential side effect(s) of hypertonic enteral formulas?

Nausea.
Diarrhea.
Cramping.
Vomiting.
All of the above.

23. How can side effects of hypertonic enteral formulas be prevented?

Concentrate the enteral formula.
Dilute the hypertonic enteral formula to prevent complications.
Stop the tube feeding immediately.
Admister the hypertonic enteral formula slowly so GI tract can adapt.
First two selections only.

24. How do you determine calorie and protein needs for the TF patient?

Give more calories and protein than a non-TF patient.
Give more calories but less protein than a non-TF patient.
Give less calories and protein than a non-TF patient.
Calculate the nutritional needs as you would for any other patient.

25. What volume of a standard enteral formula would a patient requiring 2800 kilocalories need?

1000 mL.
2800 mL.
5600 mL.
6000 mL.
5300 mL.

26. If the patient requires 100-120 g of protein/day and the enteral fromula contains 44 g protein/L, will the patient meet the protein needs in the required volume of formula?

Yes.
No.

27. If the enteral formula contains 100% of RDA for vitamins and minerals in 1500 ml formula, will this patient meet vitamin and mineral needs in the required volume of formula?

Yes.
No.

28. What is the fluid requirement for a patient whose UBW is 65 kg? (ml/kg method)

1225 mL/d.
1275 mL/d.
2275 mL/d.
1257 mL/d.
3275 mL/d.

29. How much additional water would a patient with UBW of 65 kg need, if 2400 ml of a standard formula (85% free water) were administered daily?

235 mL.
275 mL.
155 mL.
125 mL.

30. What is the "obligatory fluid output"?

The minimum urine output necessary to excrete wastes.
The maximum urine output possible per day.
The maximum urine output necessary to excrete wastes.
The minimum urine output possible per day.

31. What is the RSL of 2000 ml of an enteral formula with 37.5g protein/L, 22mEq sodium/L, 26 mEq potassium/L, and 52 mEq chloride/L. (Assume formula is for an adult.)

488 mOsm.
142.75 mOsm.
635 mOsm.
317.5 mOsm.

32. What is the desired urine output of a person on the formula in question #31?

214 - 428 mL.
1270 - 1587.5 mL.
635 mL.
952.5-1270 mL.

33. What is/are the method/s of tube feeding administration?

Bolus.
Continuous drip.
Intermittent drip.
Permanent.
First two selections.

34. How much formula can be given in one bolus feeding?

100 - 150 mL.
200 - 250 mL.
150 - 200 mL.
250 - 300 mL.

35. What is residual volume and what is considered excessive residual volume?

Formula left in the stomach; 20 - 50 ml is considered excessive.
Formula left in the ilium; 50 ml is considered excessive.
Formula left in the small intestine; > 100 - 150 ml is considered excessive.
Formula left in the stomach; > 100 - 150 ml is considered excessive.

36. Tube feeding should be started at_______mL/h, then gradually increased by_______mL/h every 8-12 h as tolerated until final volume is reached.

50; 25.
25; 50.
100; 50.
50; 50.

37. If a patient's enteral volume requirement is 2400 ml, what will the final rate be?

125 mL/h.
100 mL/h.
50 mL/h.
75 mL/h.

38. Is it always necessary to dilute a formula when it is first introduced?

Yes.
No.

39. What are the five signs of intolerance to a tube feeding?

Nausea, diarrhea, cramping, constipation, dehydration.
Nausea, diarrhea, cramping, constipation, heartburn.
Nausea, diarrhea, cramping, vomiting, dehydration.

40. Blenderized formulas and opened canned formulas should be used within _______ hours of preparation or opening.

6 hours.
12 hours.
24 hours.
32 hours.

41. Can fresh formula be added to formula left in a tube feeding bag?

Yes.
No.

42. A patient's _______ should be elevated at least ________ degrees for continuous drip and bolus feedings that ________.

Head; 30; directly enter the intestine.
Head; 30; directly enter the stomach.
Stomach; 30; directly enter the intestine.
Head; 45; directly enter the stomach.

43. What are concerns of drug aministration via feeding tubes?

Feeding tube getting clogged with the drug.
Drug nutrient interactions.
Feeding tube hindering drug absorption.
Dilution of the enteral formula by the drug.
increasing the blood concentration of the drug.
First two selections.

44. What medication is most commonly associated with diarrhea among tube-fed patients?

Diuretics.
Anti-inflammatory drugs.
Antibiotics.
Chemotherapy.

45. How is hydration monitored in a patient on tube feeding?

Hydration is monitored by daily weights.
Hydration is monitored by serum hematocrit.
Hydration is monitored by BUN.
Hydration is monitored by electrolytes.
First three answers.

46. How are adequacy of energy and protein monitored in a patient on tube feeding?

Daily body weight, body mass index for protein.
BUN for energy, elecrolyte for protein.
Serum albumin for energy; hematocrit for protein.
Daily body weight for energy; prealbumin/albumin for protein.