LRC

GRADUATE STUDENTS

Resources for Graduate Students

 

INDIVIDUAL CONSULTATIONS FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS (during the regular semester)

   Grad Students with writing projects are invited to call or drop by to make a 30-minute appointment to meet with Dr. Terrie Mathis (English/Linguistics faculty member) to discuss your graduate project, thesis, or dissertation.  Dr.  Mathis has experience teaching writing, academic writing for graduate students, and graduate seminars in linguistics.

    In addition, Prof. Mary Marca, who taught English classes at CSUN for more than 20 years, is also here to help you.  Both have extensive experience working with English Language Learners.

You can work together on a range of writing issues.  Just bring in a question or concern like: 

My advisor says my writing is too informal.
My advisor says my sentence structure is hard to follow. 
How do I transition from this section to the next?
How do I wrap up this section?
How do I integrate my sources?
Is my literature review well-organized?

Given the 30-minute session, only relatively short sections of a long project can receive attention.  Come to the appointment focused and ready to work.  Dr. Mathis is available Tuesday and Thursday afternoons.  Call (818) 677-2033 to make an appointment.

Our other Writing Consultants are also happy to help grad students.  Several of them are faculty in the English department and have years of experience working with student writers.  You can find out about their available hours here.

THESIS/ DISSERTATION WRITERS' RETREAT -- Summer 2017

CSUN’s Thesis/Dissertation Writing Retreat will take place Tuesday through Friday, May 30 to June 2, 2017. 
  • Procrastinating on your Master’ s thesis or Doctoral dissertation?
  • Want to kick start your writing?
  • Need uninterrupted quiet time with a writing expert nearby?
This summer, the Learning Resource Center with the Office of Graduate Studies will offer a 4-day intensive writing retreat for graduate students who have a significant start on their thesis/dissertation and need something more to get in gear. 
We’ll provide the space, computers, lunch, snacks, social support and a writing expert. A limited number of graduate students will be selected by Grad Studies to participate in this writing retreat.  Interested students should apply to the Office of Graduate Studies.
 
 

ONLINE WRITING RESOURCES FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS

  • CSUN Graduate Studies Thesis/Dissertation and Graduate Project Information

http://www.csun.edu/research-graduate-studies/thesisdissertation-and-graduate-project-deadlines

This page from our University shows deadlines and offers links to pdf’s on formatting guidelines for theses/dissertations/projects.  It also links you to necessary guidelines for research on human/animal subjects. 

 

  • The Writing Lab at Purdue

https://owl.english.purdue.edu

The nation's flagship electronic writing center. This site offers an unusually wide selection of handouts, exercises, and self-tutorials on topics including punctuation basics, writing research papers, and documentation across academic disciplines.

 

  • Claremont Writing Center Resources for Students

http://www.cgu.edu/pages/775.asp

The Claremont Graduate University’s website offers many resources to assist graduate students with conference proposals and presentations, and thesis and dissertations.

 

  • University of Minnesota Duluth – Literature Review

http://www.duluth.umn.edu/~hrallis/guides/researching/litreview.html

Helen Mongan-Rallis offers step-by-step approach for writing a Literature Review. Links to other resources are also present.

 

  • The University of North Carolina’s Writing Center – Writing the Abstract

http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/abstracts/

This site offers valuable information on writing the abstract in multiple disciplines.

 

  • Reporting Verbs from The University of Warwick

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/al/learning_english/leap/grammar/reportingverbs/

This page offers a variety of verbs that indicate a neutral or evaluative stance towards the information that you present.

 

  • How to Read a Scholarly Article from Western Libraries

http://www.lib.uwo.ca/tutorials/howtoreadascholarlyarticle

Reading an article from beginning to end is not the best way to approach articles when trying to decide if they are relevant to your research.  A clever video and transcript offers tips on how to most efficiently read scholarly articles.  

 

  • Plagiarism Overview from the Purdue OWL

https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/589/1/

This page and related links offer an overview of the challenges of avoiding what is commonly called plagiarism or misuse of sources.