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Instructional Video Considerations

In the past, using video as a teaching tool was as simple as checking out a videotape or DVD from the library and playing it on the classroom VCR or DVD player, or by arranging access over the University Video Network. In some cases, these may still be viable options. For many faculty today, however, new sources of “digital” video content (including material produced by the instructors themselves) have presented exciting opportunities on the one hand, and technical challenges on the other. There are a variety of options for deploying video in traditional and online classrooms with some technical limitations. The information provided on these webpages, and the included video and infographic below, aim to help faculty navigate the decision process.

infographic: title reads "Thinking Video? Resources and technical considerations for faculty using digital video in traditional or online classrooms", a silhouette of a head with a film strip and play button in place of a brain, extruding from the head are four thought bubbles like in a comic strip -- "I want to create videos for my class;" "I want to find videos for my class; "I need to store my videos;" "Finally, I need to deliver my videos to students." Icons of the technology/software needed for these items included in each thought bubble.

Visit the pages below for more information and resources:

  1. CREATE: First, faculty may consider making their own content (recorded lectures or instructional videos). Read more about creating videos...
  2. FIND: Alternatively, faculty can search for existing video content from external sources (that permit academic use), or use some combination of these two types (original and found material). Either way, videos should be captioned. Read more about finding videos...
  3. STORE: Next, when creating their own video projects, faculty will need a place to store any resulting video “files.” Typically, video clips take up considerably more computer space than word processing documents or photographs. Read more about storing videos...
  4. DELIVER: Finally, faculty must choose how they will deliver videos to students, depending on the storage container and whether or not the materials will be presented in a face-to-face class or an online course environment. Read more about delivering videos...