English

  • Photograph of English Classroom

    Department of English

English

Welcome to the Department of English

Welcome to the Department of English, a part of the College of Humanities at California State University-Northridge. With over thirty-five tenured and tenure-track faculty, we are one of the largest and most diverse departments on the Northridge campus. The Department of English offers a wide variety of courses and program in the fields of literature, language, composition and rhetoric, and creative writing. One of several curricula may be selected by students who intend to adopt English as a major or minor, or by those who wish to take English course. The faculty and staff of the Department of English are committed to helping students meet their educational goals and expects its majors, especially, to be able to write clearly and correctly.

Our Mission

Values

  1. A commitment to teaching the knowledge and skills for critical reading, writing, and thinking

    We teach the conventions, terminology, and practice(s) of the discipline at the university level. We teach the historical and intellectual backgrounds for the study of literature, creative writing, composition, and linguistics. We encourage students to use this knowledge to develop and extend the discipline through their own creative and intellectual endeavors. We teach the value of language and literature within a broader social context.

  2. A commitment to preparing students to be informed and responsible participants in a democratic society

    We encourage students to develop a commitment to cultural and other forms of diversity in and beyond the classroom through an engagement with various literatures, theories, and creative works. We teach respect for all people(s) while recognizing both the differences and commonalities that contribute to a diverse, democratic society. In addition, we encourage students to participate in service learning, to seek community involvement, and to pursue other forms of non-traditional education.

  3. A commitment to fostering life-long learning among students as they pursue personal and professional goals

    We believe that studies in language, literature, and writing establish a strong foundation for a life of intellectual curiosity, creative activity, and personal development. Therefore, we seek to make students aware of the ways in which reading and writing, like language itself, can be experienced as open-ended and ever-developing activities that significantly enrich personal experience and can contribute to professional advancement. We aim to provide students with the literacy skills and critical capacities to frame guiding questions that will sustain reading and writing throughout their lives.

  4. A commitment to fostering professional development among colleagues

    We believe effective teachers continue to learn and also to share their knowledge through publication and other professional activity. Through our activities, we expand our own knowledge, disseminate our ideas to contribute to ongoing professional conversations, deepen our understanding of pedagogy, and update our teaching skills.

  5. A commitment to sharing knowledge beyond the university classroom in a variety of venues

    As active professionals and public intellectuals, we seek to share and develop knowledge by disseminating our work in a variety of public forums. We seek to foster connections among students, faculty, and various cultural, academic, and community-based organizations for mutual enrichment through service, shared knowledge, and creative activity.

Student Learning Outcomes of the Undergraduate Program

  1. You will gain the ability to read critically.
  2. You will gain the ability to write effectively.
  3. You will gain a broad knowledge of and the ability to engage with relevant theories.
  4. You will gain a broad knowledge of literary and cultural history with an emphasis on British and American literature and culture.
  5. You will gain knowledge of the cultural diversity of literature.
  6. In addition to these primary learning outcomes, the Department of English has designated the additional learning outcomes for the following options:

Students in the Creative Writing Option are expected to reach the following Learning Outcomes

  1. You will learn to write and revise creative work using techniques and strategies employed by experienced writers.
  2. You will develop the critical ability to read and understand poetry, narrative, and/or drama.
  3. You will learn to reflect on your own creative writing in relation to relevant literary and theoretical traditions.
  4. You will work at advanced levels in at least one creative writing genre.

Students in the Subject Matter Option are expected to reach the fol­lowing Learning Outcomes

  1. You will gain knowledge of the nature and structure of the English language and its relationship to other human languages.
  2. You will gain knowledge of and the ability to apply rhetorical and composition theory.
  3. You will develop the ability to participate in discourse pertaining to the disciplines of English.

In addition to the above Subject Matter Option Learning Outcomes, students in the Four-Year Integrated and Junior-Year Integrated Subject Matter Options are expected to reach the following Learning Outcomes:

  1. You will develop the ability to engage and support all secondary students (grades 6-12) in learning.
  2. You will develop the ability to create and maintain effective environments for secondary student learning.
  3. You will develop the ability to make subject matter comprehensible for student learning.
  4. You will develop the ability to plan instruction and design learning experiences for all secondary students.
  5. You will develop the ability to assess secondary students’ learning.
  6. You will give evidence of the ability to develop as a professional educator.

Students in the Honors Option are expected to reach the following Learning Outcomes

  1. You will gain the ability to articulate clear interpretations of cultural texts
  2. You will gain the ability to engage in independent research and scholarship.
  3. You will gain the ability to present a scholarly paper.

Student Learning Outcomes of the Graduate Program in Literature

  1. You will gain the ability to apply major critical approaches to the study of English language and literature.
  2. You will gain the ability to conduct advanced literary research, including bibliographical and historical study.
  3. You will gain the ability to write advanced analyses that take into account current schools of critical methodology and are informed by professional standards of literary research.
  4. You will gain the ability to present scholarly analyses through confer­ence presentations, including the annual Honors Colloquium and AGSE Spring Conference.

Student Learning Outcomes of the Graduate Program in Creative Writing

  1. You will develop the ability to apply major critical approaches to the study of English language and literature.
  2. You will demonstrate improvement and a growing sophistication in the application of creative writing techniques.
  3. You will demonstrate familiarity with contemporary literature and proficiency with a variety of poetic, dramatic, and narrative forms, and with the critical vocabulary for discussing those forms.
  4. You will demonstrate an understanding of aspects of the writing profession, including literary publishing, performance, reviewing, and participating in professional conferences.

Student Learning Outcomes of the Graduate Program in Rhetoric and Composition

  1. You will gain the ability to apply major critical approaches to the study of English language and literature.
  2. You will gain the ability to conduct research appropriate to rhetoric and composition, including bibliographical, historical, ethnographi­cal, and classroom research.
  3. You will gain the ability to write advanced analyses that take into account current schools of rhetorical theory and criticism, and con­temporary theories of composition and communication.
  4. You will gain the ability to write and present textual analysis of data-based and qualitative research that would be appropriate for academic dissemination in the fields of composition and rhetoric.
  5. Those intending to be classroom teachers will gain the ability to think critically and reflectively about their teaching as informed by professional modes of inquiry.
 

Department News

In Memoriam: Robert Reid

April 2, 2014 - Emeritus Professors Robert Reid has passed away. Read more

In Memoriam: Susanne Collier-Lakeman

April 2, 2014 - It is with a very heavy heart we announce that our colleague Susanne Collier-Lakeman has passed away. Read more

In Memoriam: Lary Gibson

April 2, 2014 - We are very sorry to report that Emeritus Professor Lary Gibson has passed away after a struggle with pneumonia and heart problems. Read more

Professor Kleinman helps develop search tool Serendip-o-matic

February 19, 2014 - Serendip-o-matic has won the Digital Humanities Awards 2013 Best use of DH for fun category! Read more

Professor Kleinman Awarded NEH Grant to Expand Access to Rare Early Middle English Texts

July 24, 2013 - English professor Scott Kleinman has received a $200,000 Scholarly Editions and Translations grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities Read more

View all English Department News