American Indian Studies

Faculty & Staff

Scott Andrews, Ph.D., Director

B.A., University of Oklahoma, 1987
M.A., University of California, Riverside, 1993
Ph.D., University of California, Riverside, 2000

Dr. Andrews is an enrolled member of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma.  He teaches American and American Indian literatures in the English Department and the American Indian Studies Program's course on popular culture. Dr. Andrews has published book reviews, essays, fiction, and poetry.

He can be reached at scott.andrews@csun.edu.


Karren Baird-Olson, Ph.D.

B.S., Montana State University, Bozeman, 1962
M.A., University of Montana, Missoula, 1984
Ph.D., University of New Mexico, 1994

Dr. Baird-Olson is of Wyandot descent and in 1958 she married into the Nakota Nation of the Fort Peck Assiniboine and Sioux reservation (Montana). She teaches American Indian Studies courses and criminology courses in the Department of Sociology. Her publications include articles on American Indian women's spiritual practices, victimization, and activism.

She can be reached at karren.bairdolson@csun.edu.


Brian Burkhart, Ph.D.

B.A., University of Northern Colorado, 1997
Ph.D., Indiana University, 2008

Dr. Burkhart is of Cherokee descent but grew up on the Navajo Nation in Arizona.  He specializes in American Indian intellectual history, environemental philosophy and justice, sacred places and development, and other issues.  His forthcoming book is titled Respect for Kinship: Toward an Indigenous Environmental Ethics.

He can be reached at brian.burkhart@csun.edu.


Kimberly Robertson, Ph.D.

B.A. University of Northern Colorado, 1999
M.A., University of Michigan, 2001 
M.A., University of California, Los Angeles, 2008
Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles, 2012

Dr. Robertson is a citizen of the Muscogee Creek Nation and an activist, teacher, scholar, and mother.  She teaches courses in American Indian Studies and Gender & Women’s Studies.  Her academic interests and political commitments include the relationships between violence against Native women, the construction of identity, urbanity, sovereignty, and indigenous feminisms.

She can be reached at kimberly.robertson@csun.edu.