Educational Psychology & Counseling

Masters of Science in Counseling, Option in School Psychology

Why Become a School Psychologist?

The job of a school psychology provides many rewards and opportunities to work with students, educators, parents, and community members. School psychologists work primarily in the schools providing assessments, consultation, counseling, crisis intervention, and academic, behavioral, and social emotional interventions to support student learning and social adjustment. School psychologists are well regarded and respected in the schools and earn a respectable salary. And... Most school psychologist get the summers off! Not to mention, school psychology as a field has been ranked among the hundred best jobs in the nation.

Overview of the School Psychology Program

The School Psychology Program in the Department of Educational Psychology and Counseling at CSUN is geared for students who have a background in education or psychology. Applicants who are interested in entering the exciting field of school psychology and who have worked as teachers, special educators, teacher assistants, or served in other professional or paraprofessional roles in the schools will be well suited for entrance into the program.

The school psychology program at CSUN is a comprehensive, combined full time Masters of Science degree program in Counseling, with a specialization in School Psychology. In addition, students will also be working and an Advanced Pupil Personnel Services Credential. Students applying will be seeking both a Masters of Science degree in Counseling with specialization in School Psychology and an Advanced Pupil Personnel Services Credential. The school psychology program at CSUN is a three-year full time specialist program.

Courses in the School Psychology program are offered primarily during the evening hours (4:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m.); however, there may be occasional courses offered during the day.

Required courses for the Masters degree in Counseling are: EPC 655, EPC 643, EPC 659A, EPC 659B, EPC 601, and EPC 603. The remainder of the courses listed on the program sequence are related to the field of school psychology.

School Psychology Program Coordinators and Support Personnel

Coordinators of the School Psychology Program provide information, advisement, counseling, and support for students interested or involved in the program. Coordinators teach courses in the School Psychology program, organize and participate in the selection of students, chair student committees for the graduate project and thesis, review student programs to certify successful completion, evaluate student progress in the program, and make policy and procedural decision regarding the School Psychology program and students.

Coordinators for the School Psychology Program are:

Program Coordinator:
Wilda Laija-Rodriguez, Ph.D., L.E.P.
Office: ED 2226
(818) 677-7889
wilda.laija@csun.edu

Admissions Coordinator:
Alberto Restori, Ph.D., L.E.P.
Office ED 2114
(818) 677-4572

Advisors:

1st Year SP Program Advisors

Wilda Laija-Rodriquez, Ph.D., L.E.P.

Alberto Restori, Ph.D.

2nd Year SP Program Advisors

Wilda Laija-Rodriquez, Ph.D., L.E.P.

Alberto Restori, Ph.D.

3rd Year SP Program Advisors

Wilda Laija-Rodriquez, Ph.D., L.E.P.

Alberto Restori, Ph.D.

Michael Geisser, M.A.

Practica and Internship: Alberto Restori, Ph.D., Wilda Laija-Rodriguez, Ph.D., Michael Geisser, M.A.

Thesis and Graduate Project: Albert Restori, Ph.D. , Wilda Laija-Rodriguez, Ph.D., Michael Geisser, M.A., Joan Golden, Ph.D.,

Credentialing: Alberto Restori, Ph.D., Wilda Laija-Rodriguez, Ph.D., Michael Geisser, M.A.

Other Support Personnel for the School Psychology Program:

Graduate Coordinator

Merril Simon, Ph.D.

merril.simon@csun.edu

ED 2222

(818) 677-2558

Graduate Advisor

Shannon Sexton

epcdept@csun.edu

ED 1223

(818) 677-5719

Department Office Manager

Maria King

ED 1218

(818) 677-2601

Department Secretary

Naomi Gonzalez

ED 1218

(818) 677-2599

Our department secretary is the main contact for student files, information and forms for graduate students in the program.

Mission Statement

The mission of the School Psychology program at CSUN is to prepare school psychologists for careers within school-based teams to help all children attain academic and social success through prevention and/or appropriate intervention. To achieve this objective, candidates in school psychology use the systems ecological and scientist-practitioner models to exercise professional and ethical practice. Students attain skills in consultation, assessment, counseling, intervention, ethics, and research. Data-based decision making is emphasized in all aspects of service delivery. Working at both the individual and systems level of service delivery, students develop the skills to facilitate collaboration among families, school personnel, and community members to create and maintain safe, supportive, and effective learning environments. They creatively use program evaluation methods and culturally compatible solutions to dissolve barriers that impede the learning process and social adjustment of students. Through their development, candidates become competent professionals, life-long learners, innovators, social justice advocates, and leaders in the field.

Philosophy

The School Psychology program at CSUN is designed upon the following beliefs, which are consistent with the National Association of School Psychologist (NASP) and California Commission for Teacher Credentialing (CCTC) standards for training.

We believe that school psychologists should be trained in a scientist-practitioner using a systems ecological model emphasizing professional and ethical practice. We emphasize both scientist and practitioner to indicate that we expect our graduates to follow and develop best practices derived from scientifically based information and using data to base their decisions. We believe that our students should be educated in the scientist-practitioner model using an ecological perspective to account for the complexity and multi-culturally diverse school population in California and throughout the country in order to develop accepting and effective learning environments at home and in the school settings.

An important focus of the CSUN's School Psychology Program is to prepare school psychologists with the knowledge and skills to work successfully in multi-culturally diverse school settings. In addition, we believe that school psychology candidates should be well trained in all aspects of service delivery emphasizing data based decision making in assessment, counseling, consultation, prevention, and intervention.

Goals, Objectives, and Expectations

Consistent with NASP and CCTC standards, the school psychology program at CSUN has the following goals, objectives, and expectations for school psychology candidates:

  • Data Based Decision Making and Accountability: School psychology candidates will approach data based decision making from a systems ecological approach and use the problem-solving framework as the basis for all professional activities, as they gather reliable and valid data through various means, which include observations, interviews, and formal and informal assessments in all relevant settings. In interpreting data, school psychology candidates will consider cultural, language, developmental, and systemic factors that contribute to the eligibility of students for special education, as well as in the development of prevention and intervention plans. In designing intervention plans, school psychology candidates assist with design and implementation of interventions, use systematic data collection procedures to monitor progress and evaluate outcomes for students. School psychology candidates use the data to evaluate student outcomes, as well as the effectiveness of their own services. School psychology candidates use technology resources for intervention development, design, maintenance, data collection, and decision making. (NASP Standard II; CCTC Standard 4, 5, 6, 7,15, 19, 22, 23 ,25, & 26).
  • Consultation and Collaboration: School psychology candidates will use collaborative consultation with parents and educators using problem solving skills and data based decision-making when addressing academic and social emotional issues and plan, implement, and evaluate interventions based on data. School psychology candidates will use effective communication and interpersonal skills when facilitating group interactions to produce efficient and meaningful solutions for problems addressed. School psychology candidates will become skilled in producing change at an individual, family, group and with multi-level systems with diverse populations through problem solving and data based decision-making. (NASP Standard III; CCTC Standard 7, 10, 13, 20, 21, 23, 25 and 26).
  • Interventions and Instructional Support to Develop Academic Skills: School psychology candidates will have knowledge of biological, cultural, cognitive research and neuroscience, and social influences on academic skills, human learning and development, cognitive, and developmental processes and evidence based curricula and instructional strategies. School psychology candidates will use all available assessment information in developing appropriate instructional, cognitive, academic, behavioral and/or self-regulation goals and strategies to support learning and adjustment through effective teaching, evidenced based instructional strategies, and assistive technology resources in order to enhance student's academic and cognitive skills and help them attain state and local academic benchmarks. (NASP Standard IV 4.1; CCTC Standard 5, 11, 18, 22, 25, and 26).
  • Interventions and Mental Health Services to Develop Social and Life Skills: School psychology candidates will have knowledge of biological, cultural, developmental, and social influences on behavior and mental health, behavioral, and emotional impact s on learning and life skills, and evidenced based strategies to promote social emotional functioning and mental health. School psychology candidates will provide a variety of services to address effective life skills, coping, and regulation using behavioral assessment and intervention, individual and group counseling, positive school wide behavioral supports and/or consultation. School psychology candidates will use data to design, implement, and evaluate progress and outcomes, as well as their own effectiveness. In addition, school psychology candidates will have skills to assess and address issues related to self-esteem and personal and social responsibility. (NASP Standard IV 4.2; CCTC Standard 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, 10, 14, 17, 19, 20, 21, 22, 25, and 26).
  • School Wide Practices to Promote Learning: School psychology candidates will have knowledge of school and systems structure, organization, and theory, policy development, and climate, as well as general and special education programs, technology resources, and evidence-based school practices that promote learning and mental health. School psychology candidates will demonstrate skills to develop and implement practices and strategies to create and maintain effective and supportive school wide learning environments. School psychology candidates will also have professional practices associated with schoolwide promotion of learning using an ecological perspective, organizational development and systems theory, and problem solving model to collaboratively work with parents and other school personnel to develop appropriate programs and services to promote learning environments that support diversity, resiliency, academic, and social emotional growth at a systems level. (NASP Standard V 5.1; CCTC Standard 1, 7, 10, 13, 18, 20, 21, 23, 25, and 26).
  • Preventive and Responsive Services: school psychology candidates will have knowledge of principles and research related to resilience and risk factors in learning and mental health, services in schools and communities to support multi-systemic prevention, and evidence-based strategies for effective crisis response. School psychology candidates will demonstrate skills to promote services that enhance learning, mental health, safety, and physical well-being through protective and adaptive factors into implement effective crisis preparation, response, and recovery. In addition, school psychology candidates will provide direct counseling, behavioral interventions, and indirect interventions through consultation for students who may experience mental health problems. In addition to counseling, crisis intervention, school psychology candidates will promote wellness and resilience by collaborating with other professionals, educators, and parents. School psychology candidates will also show skills and promoting safe and violence free schools and communities. (NASP Standard V 5.2; CCTC Standard 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 13, 20, 21, 25, and 26).
  • Families School Collaboration Services: School psychology candidates will have knowledge of principles and research related to family systems, strengths, needs and culture, and as well as evidence-based strategies to support family influences on children's learning, socialization, and mental health, and methods to develop collaboration between families and schools. School psychology candidates will demonstrate skills in collaboration with others to design, implement, and evaluate services that respond to culture and context and facilitate family and school partnership interactions with community agencies to enhance academic and social emotional outcomes for children. (NASP Standard VI; CCTC Standards 7, 10, 13, 20, 21, 23, 25 and 26).
  • Diversity in Development and Learning: School psychology candidates will have knowledge of individual differences, abilities, disabilities, and other diverse characteristics that are influenced by biological, social, cultural, ethnic, socioeconomic, gender, and linguistic factors in development and learning. In addition, candidates will know about principles and research related to diversity factors for children, families, and schools, including factors related to culture, contexts, and individual enrolled differences and evidence-based strategies to enhance service in address potential influences related to diversity. School psychology candidates will have an understanding and respect for diversity in development and learning and advocate for social justice in all aspects of service delivery. (NASP Standard VII; CCTC Standards 3, 4, 5, 7, 10, 17, 20, 21, 22, 25, and 26).
  • Research and Program Evaluation: School psychology candidates will have core foundational knowledge and experiences and employ practices and strategies in research, program evaluation, and legal, ethical and professional practice. School psychology candidates will have knowledge of research design, statistics, measurement, very data collection and analysis techniques, and program evaluation methods sufficient for understanding research and interpreting data in a plate settings. School psychology candidates will demonstrate skills to evaluate and apply research as a foundation for service delivery and in collaboration with others using various techniques and technology resources for data collection, measurement, analysis, and program evaluation to support effective practices at the individual, group, and or systems levels. (NASP Standard VIII 8.1; CCTC Standards 23, 24, 25, and 26).
  • Legal, Ethical and Professional Practice: School psychology candidates will have knowledge of the history and foundations of school psychology, multiple service models and methods, ethical, legal, and professional standards, as well as other factors related to professional identity and effective practice as school psychologists. School psychology candidates will demonstrate skills to provide services consistent with ethical, legal, and professional standards in order to engage in responsive ethical and professional decision-making collaboratively with other professionals and applied professional work characteristics needed for effective practice as school psychologist, including respect for human diversity and social justice, communication skills, effective interpersonal skills, responsibility, adaptability, initiative, dependability, and technology skills. (NASP Standard VIII 8.2; CCTC Standards 6, 12, 14, 15, 16, 19, 25, and 26).
  • Supervision and Mentoring: School psychology candidates will have the skills and experiences to mentor other students during the program. In addition, school psychology candidates will gain skills and experiences to be able to supervise future school psychology candidates. (CCTC Standard 16).
  • Practica in School Psychology and Culminating Internship Experience: School psychology candidates will be expected to complete at least 450 hours of school psychology practicum experience in the schools. In addition, school psychology candidates will be expected to complete at least 1200 hours of internship experience in the schools. While some variations may be allowed, these will need to be consistent to state and national standards and approved by the school psychology program coordinator. (CCTC Standard 25, 26).
  • Determination of Candidate Competence: School psychology candidates will be assessed for competence in the various professional areas and standards delineated by NASP and CCTC standards on the Performance Based Outcomes (PBOs) documents for practica and internship in school psychology satisfactorily assessed by both their site supervisor as well as university professor. Determination of candidate competence will also be based on grades of B or better in all coursework, relevant rubrics in professional practice, and satisfactory supervisory evaluation(s). In addition, school psychology candidates are expected to exhibit ethical, professional, and exceptional interpersonal and communication skills. (CCTC Standard 27).
  • Culminating Activity: School psychology candidates are expected to complete a culminating activity to be assessed by the chair of the culminating activity committee with at least satisfactory ratings. Candidates will have the option to choose either a thesis, project, or comprehensive exam. Candidates are expected to do a comprehensive literature review of research studies on chosen topics. Candidates are expected to be able to analyze research design and critically evaluate the statistics used as part of being an informed research consumer. (NASP Standard VIII 8.1; CCTC Standards 23, 24, 25, and 26).

Admission Requirements

General Admission Requirements: All applicants must demonstrate evidence of suitability for graduate work in School Psychology and complete the application process by the published deadline for that year. In addition to our application form, applicants must submit transcripts (may be unofficial) of all prior academic work, documentation of having taken the GRE and passing the Upper Division Writing Proficiency Exam, two to three letters of recommendation on the recommender's stationery, and a statement of personal and professional goals, objectives, and paid and unpaid work history. The personal statement must include information regarding applicants' experiences related to working with cultural or ethnic minorities. A resume is also required. Experience working with school aged children (voluntary or paid) is required, preferably in a school setting.

Those who meet the requirements will be invited for an interview. The interview dates will be posted on the departmental webpage by the application deadline date.

Applicants must take the GRE and pass the Upper Division Writing Exam. All students must also take the CBEST by the end of the first semester. This is a credentialing requirement. In addition to the general requirements stated above, all School Psychology applicants must have completed or be enrolled in the following undergraduate courses or their equivalents:

Prerequisites (12 units)

EPC 314 Psychological Foundations, K-12 (3) (Waived for applicants who have a teaching credential)
EPC 430 Development and Learning in Early Childhood Education (3)
EPC 451 Fundamentals of Counseling and Guidance (3)
EPC 600 Educational Statistics for Research and Measurement (3)
(Equivalent courses may be substituted for prerequisites with approval.)

Students who have taken equivalent course at other institutions will need to submit a course equivalency form, transcripts, university course description, and course syllabi. Graduate advisors and school psychology professors will evaluate and determine whether the requested courses are equivalent to the pre-requisites.

All applicants for graduate study must submit an application to the department and a graduate application to the University. Four prerequisite courses for the School Psychology masters degree and credential programs must be completed with a grade of "B-" or better in order to matriculate into the program. In addition to the above requirements, students under serious consideration will be expected to complete a structured interview process. Selection of students is made by the School Psychology program coordinators based on evaluation of written application material, references, grades/GRE scores, paid and unpaid work experience, writing sample, and the structured interview. Interviews are conducted by teams composed of CSUN school psychology faculty, school psychologists or other school personnel in the field, and advanced graduate students. Admission to the School Psychology masters and credential program requires a formal letter of acceptance from the program coordinator.

Note: The School Psychology program at CSUN is a FULL time three year program designed to prepare professional School Psychologists.

Application Procedures

Application Period for Master's Degree and Advanced Student/Credential Applications:

The School Psychology program only admits applicants for the Fall semester. Each accepted cohort begins their course of study in the Fall Semester. As a result, applications are typically accepted from January 2 to February 14, but check department's website for specific dates.

It is the student's responsibility to be sure that all information is submitted by the deadline. Only applicants whose files are completed by the deadline will be considered for admission.

General Applicant Procedures

All applicants must apply to the University and to the Department.

All applicants must submit a Department Application in addition the University Application. Please download the department application and application process documents on the department website or contact the department office at (818) 677-2599 to request a copy if you cannot download the forms from the webpage.

  • Credential Requirements: All School Psychology applicants must work towards the advanced pupil personnel services credential in School Psychology and must open a file with the credential office the first semester of the program.
  • CBEST: All credential candidates must pass the California Basic Education Test (CBEST) to be eligible for the PPS credential.
  • The Interview Process: School Psychology applicants who are seen as viable candidates for the program will be asked to participate in an individual and/or group interview in person as part of the application process. When the applicant's file is complete including application, test scores, letters of recommendation, personal statement, transcripts and testing results, and resume, selected applicants are notified to attend an interview. Only completed applications will be considered. Applicants are responsible for making sure their files are complete. Please submit all documents for consideration in the same envelope as the departmental application.

The School Psychology program interviews take place in February or March. The specific date(s) will be posted on the department webpage under "Admissions Process." The interview is approximately three hours in length. It consists of a series of activities including questions about the profession, a psychology dyad, and a novel activity that will assess the applicants' personal and professional traits and characteristics. Interview facilitators consist of faculty, professional school psychologists and advanced students. Interview groups are deliberately kept small, approximately six applicants to two facilitators to insure personal attention to each applicant, when interviewed in a group. Viable candidates may be interviewed individually.

Selection of Applicants

Selection of Candidates: Candidates are notified of the results of their applications by mid-May. The Admissions Committee takes into consideration the following factors in making its decision: Applicants' professional and educational background, grades/GRE test scores, interview results, paid and unpaid work experiences, and letters of recommendation. Due to the small numbers of candidates admitted in relation to the large number of applicants, many qualified persons are not admitted into the program.

The actual number of applicants admitted each year varies based on faculty, department resources, and other criteria existing at the time of the admissions period.

School Psychology Program Sequence

Masters in Counseling and Pupil Personnel Credential in
School Psychology

PREREQUISITES (12 Units)

EPC 314 Psychological Foundations, K-12 (3) (Waived for applicants who have a teaching credential)
EPC 430 Development and Learning in Early Childhood Education (3)
EPC 451 Fundamentals of Counseling and Guidance (3)
EPC 600 Educational Statistics for Research and Measurement (3)
(Equivalent courses may be substituted for prerequisites with approval.)

REQUIRED COURSES for the Master's of Science in Counseling with specialization in School Psychology

Year 1:

Fall Semester

EPC 655 - Seminar in Counseling Theory and Practice (3)

EPC 659A - Communication Skills in Counseling (3)

EPC 664 - Psychological Factors in Neurodevelopmental, Emotional an dBehavioral Disorders in Youth (3)

EPC 667 - Law and Ethics and Professional Practice Schools Psychologists in Schools and Private Practice (3)

Year 1:

Spring Semester

EPC 643 - Diversity in Counseling (3)

EPC 659B - Practicum (3)

EPC 661 - Multi-Systemic Behavioral Intervention (3)

SPED 610 - Program Planning for the Exceptional Child and Youth (3)

Year 1:

Summer Semester

EPC 601 - Individual and Group Assessment (3)

EPC 647 - Family Development Across the Lifespan (3)

Year 2:

Fall Semester

EPC 659E - Practica in School Psychology: Resiliency, Prevention, and Crisis Intervention (3)

EPC 663A/L - Assessment of Cognitive Development and Skills for Intervention and Lab (3/2)

EPC 665 - Individual and Group Counseling

EPC 603 - Clinical Research and Program Evaluation (3)

Year 2:

Spring Semester

EPC 641 Bilingual Assessment

EPC 659F - Practica in School Psychology: Resiliency, Prevention, and Crisis Intervention (3)

EPC 663B/L - Assessment of Social-Emotional Adjustment for Intervention and Lab (3/2)

EPC 648 - Consultation with Parents, Teachers, and other Human Services (3)

 Year 2:

Summer Semester

EPC 611 - Seminar in Educational Psychology (3) 

 Year 3: 

Fall Semester

EPC 659G - Internship in School Psychology (3)

EPC 698C - Thesis/Graduate Project (3) 

 Year 3:

Spring Semester

EPC 659H - Internship in School Psychology (3)

EPC 697 - Comprehensive Studies (3) or

EPC 698C - Thesis/Graduate Project (3) 

 Total Units = 70 plus 3-6 units of Comprehensive Studies or Thesis/Graduate Project. Please note that 12 credit  units are based on practica (fieldwork) and internship classes. EPC 697 can only be taken once in your final semester.

Developmental Strands in School Psychology

The school psychology program has seven developmental strands. These strands include:

  1. theoretical, legal, and professional foundations
  2. development and learning
  3. counseling
  4. assessment
  5. consultation
  6. intervention
  7. research

These developmental strands were organized in a sequential manner to foster the candidate's professional development within specific areas. In some instances, the developmental strands will be composed of classes which may address one or more of the developmental strands. In some instances, information will be cross-referenced among various strands, among different classes, and among different requirements. The developmental strands were designed to help candidates become capable of meeting the various demands of the field of school psychology.

Practica in school psychology and internship provide the means to practice what candidates have learned in the various classes and to gain competence in the various areas specified above and in the Performance Based Outcomes. Candidates are required to conduct a total of 450 hours of practica their second year and a full time internship consisting of 1200 hours their third year.

Masters degree students are required to perform a culminating scholarly activity. To fulfill this requirement candidates may elect to write a thesis, carry out a project, or take a comprehensive examination.

Passing the Praxis II in school psychology exam is required of all students in the program. Students are to take and pass this exam by the end of their third year.

Course Instructors for the School Psychology Program

The School Psychology Program has many qualified full time and part time instructors. The following table shows a list of instructors.

Name/TitleArea of SpecializationCourses Taught in School PsychologyOffice and Phone Numbers
Wilda Laija-Rodriguez, Ph.D.School Psychology

EPC 659E & F: Practica and Internship in School Psychology

EPC 677: Law and Ethics and Professional Functions of School Psychologists in the Schools and Private Practice

EPC 674: Family Development Across the Lifespan

EPC 648: Consultation with Parents

EPC 611: Seminar in Educational Psychology

ED 2226

818-677-7889

Albert Restori, Ph.D.School Psychology

EPC 659 E & F: Practica in School Psychology

EPC 663 A: Assessment of Cognitive Development and Skills for Intervention

EPC 661: Multi-Systemic Behavioral Interventions

EPC 659GC & /hc - Internship in School Psychology

818-677-4572
Heater Stuve, M.A.Special EducationSPED 610: Program Planning of the Exceptional Child818-677-2507
Jose Carranza, J.D., M.A.School Psychology EPC 641: Bilingual Assessment818-677-2599
Joan Golden, Ph.D.School Psychology

EPC 664: Neuro-Development, Emotional and Behavioral Interventions

EPC 663A: Assessment of Cognitive Development and Skills for Intervention and Lab

EPC 663B: Assessment of Social-Emotional Adjustment for Intervention

818-677-2599
Pete Goldschmidt, Ph.D.Educational Psychology, Program EvaluationEPC 603: Clinical Research and Program Evaluation818-677-2599
Michael Geisser, M.A.School Psychology

EPC 659A: Communication Skills in Counseling

EPC 659B: Practicum

EPC 659GC & HC: Internship in School Psychology

818-677-2599
Madhavi Williams, Ed.D.School Psychology, Clinical and Community PsychologyEPC 655: Seminar in Counseling Theory and Practice818-677-2599
Vadeesh Saggar, M.S.School Psychology

EPC 663A Lab: Assessment of Cognitive Development and Skills for Intervention and Lab

EPC 663B Lab: Assessment of Social-Emotional Adjustment for Intervention

818-677-2599
Jean Ramage, Ph.D.School PsychologyEPC 659GC & HC: Internship in School Psychology818-677-2599

School Psychology Student Association

Mentoring and Supporting Professional Growth and Identity

The school psychology student Association is open to all students in the school psychology program as well as to alumni. The school psychology student Association's mission is to provide a means for students to mentor and support each other through their graduate studies experience, as well as to support each other's professional development as they become ready to enter the field of school psychology. In addition, the school psychology student Association provides a forum for students to promote the field of school psychology through different activities, such as celebrating school psychology week and other events.

Cabinet members as well as regular members have an opportunity to represent the school psychology program at university functions representing the field of school psychology. In addition, the school psychology student association provides an avenue to encourage school psychology candidates to participate in professional development as future school psychologists within the university, as well as promoting attendance to local, state, and national conferences in school psychology.

Cabinet members, as well as all school psychology candidates, have an opportunity to involve and interact with school psychology faculty to promote continued professional identity as school psychologists.

Cabinet members meet twice a month to plan activities for the Association's monthly meeting. All students and alumni are invited to attend and contribute. The cabinet is usually elected at the end of each school year.

For further information, please contact Dr. Wilda Laija-Rodriguez, Advisor.