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Research

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Stone, D. J., & ChenFeng, J. (2016, June). Finding voice and flourishing as beginning MFTs. Workshop Session, American Family Therapy Academy Open Conference, Denver, CO.

Abstract

Our intent with this workshop is to give voice to some of the challenges and difficult encounters related to statuses such as race, ethnicity, and gender (among others) students, trainees, and interns have with peers, faculty, supervisors, and clients on their journey to becoming a marriage and family therapist. While most MFT training programs work to promote multiculturally aware and sensitive therapists, the discussions related to the student therapist’s or intern’s experience of discrimination in the classroom, the therapy room, and/or supervision are not often facilitated. This topic is also not widely discussed in the literature. Ali et al., (2005) (from the book Voices of color: First person accounts of ethnic minority therapists) in their chapter on therapists of color speaking about their experiences with racism from colleagues, clients, and supervisors discuss the lack of opportunity for student therapists and interns to discuss these discriminatory experiences.  However, it is of critical importance to empower students to find their voice in these multiple contexts to share feelings, attitudes, and decisions connected to these experiences; without this, students with marginalizing experiences continue to have voiceless parts that do not get integrated into their whole beings, having the potential to negatively impact clinical work.  The purpose of this workshop is to engage current students and early career clinical interns in supportive discussions about self and identity in the self-of-the-therapist journey from student to licensed clinician. The presenters will share stories of students and interns grappling with questions of identity related to topics of race, religion, gender, beliefs, values, etc. and how those topics interact with the development of the therapist in academic settings and early career experiences. Supportive suggestions will be offered and new ideas generated for ways the student-trainee-supervisee can remain authentically themselves and access their voice on the self-of-the-therapist journey.

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Stone, D. J. (2017, March). Working with multiracial individuals, couples, and families.Invited Keynote Speaker, Wisconsin Association for Marriage and Family Therapy, Spring Conference, Madison, WI.

Abstract

As marriage and family therapists, we must continuously expand our knowledge and effective skills for working with more diverse populations. Multiracial individuals, couples, and families are one such population deserving increased attention. While the multiracial individual, couple, and family experience is complex, researchers generally contend that this group may encounter stressors such as racial discrimination; stigmatization; microaggressions from outside and within the family; and personal, familial, social, and/or political pressure regarding their individual, couple, and/or family identity. This is also a diverse group of people who have been resilient as families, activists, and social change agents. In this workshop, participants will learn more about who the multiracial population is—what defines this group as individuals, couples and families. As well, participants will be immersed in the stories of this subgroup of the U.S. population through first person narratives, review of the latest research, and interactive activities. Another core component of the participant’s workshop experience will include self-of-the-therapist exploration related to their social location and personal identity and facilitated engagement with others at the conference related to these ideas. Finally, participants will learn effective ways to reach these potential clients in your communities as well as meaningful interventions and useful models of therapy for addressing some of their unique challenges.

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ChenFeng, J., & Stone, D. J. (2017, September). Finding Your Voice to Flourish and Advocate as Beginning MFTs. Career Development Session, American Association of Marriage and Family Therapy National Conference, Atlanta, GA.
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Stone, D. J. (2014 March/April). Working with multiracial individuals and families: Increasing our understanding. Family Therapy Magazine, 13, 22-26.
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Stone, D. J., & ChenFeng, J. (2015 July/August). Early career MFTs: Finding voice and flourishing. Family Therapy Magazine, 14, 10-14.
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Minton, S. J. (2017). Examining graduate student engagement in counseling services with diverse populations in P-12 education. International Journal of Multicultural Education, 19(3), 103-130. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.18251/ijme.v19i3.1380

Abstract

Given the continued diversification of P-12 education, it is imperative for professional school counselors to possess multicultural counseling competency in order to effectively engage diverse students in counseling. Thus, it is relevant to examine the preparation of professional school counselors-in-training related to multicultural and social justice counseling competency. This study explores the multicultural counseling competence of five professional school counselors-in-training and offers recommendations for counselor educators teaching cross-cultural counseling courses and coordinating school counselor training programs. 

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Stone, D. J., & Dolbin-MacNab, M. L. (2017). Racial socialization practices of White mothers raising Black-White Biracial children. Contemporary Family Therapy, 39(2), 97-111.

Abstract

The purpose of this retrospective qualitative study was to examine the impact of monoracial Black or White parents’ racial socialization practices on the process of biracial identity development for their Black-White biracial children. Data were obtained through in-person, semi-structured interviews with 10 White monoracial mothers and 11 of their adult (ages 18 to 40) biracial children. The phenomenological analysis of participants’ experiences raising biracial children and growing up biracial revealed two overarching themes of racial socialization practices interacting with and influencing biracial identity development: creating a biracial family identity and navigating biracial with the outside world. Findings from this study expand the racial socialization research by connecting parental racial socialization with their child’s biracial identity and adding the unique perspective that racial socialization is an interactive family process in interracial families. Additionally, data from this study has important clinical and future research implications.

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Chen, D. (2013). Inclusion of children with special needs in diverse early care settings. In E.A. Virmani & P.L. Mangione (Eds.). Infant/toddler caregiving: A guide to culturally sensitive care (2nd. ed.,pp. 25-40). Sacramento, CA: California Department of Education

Abstract

A discussion of diverse perspectives on disability; early intervention terminology, eligibility and intervention; gathering and sharing information with families; and evidence-based and recommended practices in early intervention.

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Hudley, C. and Gottfried, A. E. (Eds.), (2008). Academic motivation and the culture of school in childhood and adolescence. NY: Oxford Press.

Abstract

The chapters in this book examne motivation with students of various ethnicities, languages, ages, achievement levels, and social classes, and attend to academic motivation in these different contexts. Goal of the book is to create a more comprehensive and integrated perspective on the multiple dimensions of school culture in the United States.

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