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Research

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Foley, B., Castillo, K. & Kelly, K. (April 27, 2013) Clinical Teaching as Professional Development for Educational Technology: Thrown Into the Digital Deep End. Paper presented at the American Educational Research Association Meeting 2013, San Francisco, CA

Abstract

Much has been written about the value of clinical teaching experiences for teachers. This paper reports on a clinical teaching effort designed to help teachers learn to integrate cloud based computing into science classed (an instructional model called Computer Supported Collaborative Science, CSCS). A team of eight teachers was asked to teach a summer school class using CSCS and a specially designed curriculum. In addition to the class, teachers participated in daily reflection and planning meetings and kept a journal of their experiences. The experience was a challenge but provided a powerful learning experience for the teachers who became enthusiastic about the curriculum. The transfer from the clinical teaching to the regular classes proved to still be a challenge for teachers.

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Burstein, J.H. & Kretschmer, D. (2008). Integrating Social Studies and Science:   Natural or Unnatural Fit? Social Studies Research and Practice, 3(3), 113-122.
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Gottfried, A. E., Marcoulides, G. A., Gottfried, A. W., Oliver, P. (2009). A latent curve model of parental motivational practices and developmental decline in math and science academic intrinsic motivation. Journal of Educational Psychology, 101, 729-739.                                                                                               

Abstract

A longitudinal approach was used to examine the effects of parental task-intrinsic and task-extrinsic motivational practices on academic intrinsic motivation in the subject areas of math and science. Parental task-intrinsic practices comprise encouragement of children’s pleasure and engagement in the learning process, whereas task-extrinsic practices comprise parents’ provision of external rewards and consequences contingent on children’s task performance. A conditional latent curve model was fit to data from the Fullerton Longitudinal Study (A. W. Gottfried, A. E. Gottfried, & D. W. Guerin, 2006), with academic intrinsic motivation in math and science assessed from ages 9 to 17 and parental motivational practices measured when children were age 9. The results indicated that task-intrinsic practices were beneficial with regard to children’s initial levels of motivation at age 9 as well as with regard to motivational decline through age 17. Conversely, parents’ use of task-extrinsic practices was adverse with regard to children’s motivation both at age 9 and across the 8-year interval. Theoretical implications of the findings with regard to academic intrinsic motivation are discussed.



















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Jeffries, C. (2011). Thinking inside the box: Using discovery boxes and learning centers to promote inquiry and teach healthy food choices at the preschool level. Science and Children, 48(6), 30-34.
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Foley, B. J., & Reveles, J. M. (2014). Pedagogy for the connected science classroom: Computer supported collaborative science and the next generation science standards. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education, 14(4). Retrieved from http://www.citejournal.org/vol14/iss4/science/article1.cfm

Abstract

The prevalence of computers in the classroom is compelling teachers to develop new instructional skills. This paper provides a theoretical perspective on an innovative pedagogical approach to science teaching that takes advantage of technology to create a connected classroom. In the connected classroom, students collaborate and share ideas in multiple ways producing a record of work that is persistent and accessible via networked-based computing (i.e., “the cloud”). The instruction method, called Computer Supported Collaborative Science (CSCS), uses web-based resources to engage all learners in the collection, analysis, and collaborative interpretation of classroom data that turns hands-on classroom activities into authentic scientific experiences. This paper describes CSCS and how it corresponds to key parts of the Next Generation Science Standards.

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Gottfried, A. E., Preston, K. S. J., Gottfried, A. W., Oliver, P. H., Delany, D. E., & Ibrahim, S. M. (2016) Pathways from parental stimulation of children’s curiosity to high school science course accomplishments and science career interest and skill, International Journal of Science Education, 38:12, 1972-1995, DOI: 10.1080/09500693.2016.1220690

Abstract

Curiosity is fundamental to scientific inquiry and pursuance. Parents are important in encouraging children’s involvement in science.This longitudinal study examined pathways from parental stimulation of children’s curiosity per se to their science acquisition (SA). A latent variable of SA was indicated by the inter-related variables of high school science course accomplishments, career interest, and skill. A conceptual model investigated parental stimulation of children’s curiosity as related to SA via science intrinsic motivation and science achievement. Parental stimulation of curiosity at age 8 years comprised exposing children to new experiences, promoting curiosity, encouraging asking questions, and taking children to a museum. Intrinsic motivation was measured at ages 9, 10, and 13 years, and achievement at ages 9, 10, and 11 years. Structural equation modelling was used for analyses. Controlling for socio-economic status, parental stimulation of curiosity bore positive and significant relations to science intrinsic motivation and achievement, which in turn related to SA. Gender neither related to stimulation of curiosity nor contributed to the model. Findings highlight the importance of parental stimulation of children’s curiosity in facilitating trajectories into science, and relevance to science education is discussed.

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Jeffries, C. (2013). Thinking inside the box. In L. Froschauer (Ed.), A year of inquiry: A collection for elementary educators (pp. 118-123). Arlington, Virginia, NSTA Press.

Abstract

The authors conducted a test to determine whether they could incorporate a discovery box into a preschool setting was successful. It stimulated the students' natural inquiry processes while promoting understanding of healthy foods and allowing for practice of fine-motor skills. It was easily incorporated into the curriculum and classroom space. Since preschoolers are naturally curious, they tried to determine and predict how the tools and components worked. They inspected the materials and used the tools to measure, analyze, and create mental models. They also constructed their own explanations. This article describes the authors' experiences developing and setting up the discovery box learning activity center for preschoolers. (Contains 3 figures and 4 print resources.)

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Sears, R., Brosnan, P., Gainsburg, J., Olaff-Lewis, J., Stone, J., Spencer, C., Riggs, L., Biagetti, S., Cayton, C., Grady. M., Clarke, P. J., & Andreasen, J. (2017). Using improvement science to transform internship experiences through co-teaching strategies. In L. West & M. Boston (Eds.), Reflective and Collaborative Processes to Improve Mathematics Teaching (pp. 265-274). Reston, VA: The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, Inc.