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Research

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Minton, S. J., & Maffini, C. (2017, April). Building awareness to build competence: Developing culturally-responsive counseling practices.  Presentation presented at the 2017 CALPCC Conference, Redlands, CA.

Abstract

Counselors strive to provide quality services within their competence and ethical boundaries. However, in an increasingly diverse country, we encounter clients who are of a culture of which we are unfamiliar or have limited knowledge. In this interactive session, we address the complexities of cultural identities and strategies for providing culturally-responsive services to clients. Attendees will engage critically to examine how the counselor’s self-awareness affects their counseling practice. Additionally, attendees will participate in experiential activities and discussions to raise awareness about their identity and abilities to advocate with and on behalf of clients, and identify culturally-responsive strategies to engage diverse clients. Lastly, there will be reflection on how one’s theoretical orientation may guide one’s work with culturally diverse clients.

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Gillon, K. & Stapleton, L.D. (2015). Your story ain’t got nothin to do with me? The experiences of Black female faculty who mentor White female students. Journal of Critical Scholarship on Higher Education and Student Affairs, 1(1), 35-49.

Abstract

Previous literature on mentoring, specifically that of cross-cultural mentoring, has provided some insight into the intricacy of race in mentoring. However, much of this literature has focused on the mentoring relationship of a White individual mentoring a person of color. This qualitative inquiry critically explores the experiences of six Black female faculty who have mentored White female students in higher education graduate programs, focusing specifically on how they enter into these cross-cultural mentoring relationships. Using Black feminist thought, our findings suggest that while individual Black faculty may have unique experiences entering into mentoring relationships with White female students, a Black feminist standpoint does exist. These faculty members entered into the relationships cautiously and with thought, responding emotionally to the idea of mentoring White students, and screening the students, before formalizing the relationship via a student-centered approach. The findings from this study serve as a starting point in which to better understand faculty of color’s experiences mentoring White students as well as provide implications for both faculty and students who may enter into such a relationship.

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Chan, S., & Chen, D. (2011). Families with Asian roots. In E.W. Lynch & M.J. Hanson (Eds.). Developing cross-cultural competence: A guide for working with children and families (4th ed., pp. 234-318). Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes.

Abstract

This chapter presents an historical and current overview of Asians immigrating to the United States, a summary of cultural beliefs and values based on religious and philosophical backgrounds, and a discussion of how diverse family perspectives may influence their interactions with professionals and expectations for their children's educational experiences, and considerations to guide the practices of teachers and other service providers.

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