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Research

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Stapleton, L.D. (2015). When being deaf is centered: d/Deaf students of color navigating Deaf and racial identity in college. Journal of College Student Development, 56(6), p. 570-586.

Abstract

Approximately 30% of d/Deaf students are successfully completing college; the reasons for such a low graduation rate is unknown (Destler & Buckly, 2011). Most research on d/Deaf college students lack racial/ethnic diversity within the study; thus, it is unclear how d/Deaf Students of Color are faring in higher education or what experiences they are having. It is no longer appropriate or socially just to conduct research that does not intentionally seek out the voices of d/Deaf Students of Color. Using a fundamental descriptive qualitative methodology, this paper sheds light on a population of students, d/Deaf Women of Color, who are often invisible within the mainstream higher education literature and expands our understand of the types of experiences they are having related to their racial/ethnic and d/Deaf identity while attending college.

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Stapleton, L.D. (2017). Audism and racism: The hidden curriculum impacting Black d/Deaf college students in the classroom. The Negro Educational Review, 67(1-4), 149-168.

Abstract

There is a historical legacy of dual discrimination and institutional oppression against Black d/Deaf students within the educational system. This oppression has manifested itself in many ways including in the classroom as the hidden curriculum (i.e., the unattended outcomes of the schooling process). The purpose of this hermeneutic phenomenological study is to understand the ways in which racism and audism might still contribute to the hidden curriculum in the college classroom and how Black d/Deaf college students resist this oppression. The theoretical frameworks of Critical Race Theory and Critical Deaf Theory along with the analytical frameworks, theory of microaggressions and Black Deaf Community Cultural Wealth guide the data collection and analysis. The findings are presented as an inverted counternarrative showing how students experience issues of audism and racism through faculty’s non-diverse curriculum, hearing-centric evaluation methods, and racist and audist faculty-student interactions. The study concludes with practical recommendations for faculty. 

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