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Research

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Jeffries, C., & Maeder, D. W. (2004 - 2005). Using vignettes to build and assess teacher understanding of instructional strategies. The Professional Educator, 27(1 & 2), 17-28.

Abstract

In the last fifty years, the use of stories in education has included vignettes as an effective stimulus for discussion of real-life contexts and problems. However, vignettes have rarely been used as an assessment tool and there is no reported consensus on their definition and design. This article documents the use of vignettes as an effective method of assessing pedagogical understanding in our teacher development courses from 1995-2003, suggesting that vignettes are significantly correlated with more traditional forms of assessment, are highly predictive of course-ending project performances, and represent an episode of learning in their own right. Finally, we propose a more concise definition and a more rigorous course of study for vignette development and implementation.

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Jeffries, C., & Maeder, D. W. (2006). Using instructional and assessment vignettes to promote recall, recognition, and transfer in educational psychology courses. Teaching Educational Psychology, 1(2), 1-19. 

Abstract

Instructors have long used short descriptive stories such as vignettes as a tool to model, teach, and research behavior and understanding as well as to stimulate discussion and problem solving in learning situations. This article summarizes the results of a study comparing the effectiveness of two types of vignettes  (evaluation and synthesis) as instructional tools and assessment tasks in five sections of an educational psychology course. Study results suggest that the positive effects of vignette instructional and assessment tasks on student mastery of subject matter are additive, regardless of the type of vignette. Mean quiz, assignment, and posttest scores in the two sections that received vignette instruction were significantly higher than those in sections that did not receive vignette instruction and differed only in terms of assessment style (forced-choice, summarization, and vignette). Scaffolding vignette instruction not only enhanced vignette assessment performance as a measure of transfer of course content, but also enhanced recognition and recall of coursecontent. 

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Jeffries, C., & Maeder, D. W. (2009). The effect of scaffolded vignette instruction on student mastery of subject matter. The Teacher Educator, 44, 21-39.
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Durdella, N.R. (2010, Spring). Evaluations that respond: Prescription, application, and implications of responsive evaluation theory for community college instructional support programs. Journal of Applied Research in the Community College 17(2), 13-23.

Abstract

This study examines two community college instructional support programs to explore the effectiveness of an evaluation model—responsive evaluation theory—that may ease the tensions between a concern over programs’ processes and reporting requirements for program outcomes. The study uses a comparative qualitative case study design and applies responsive evaluation’s prescriptive steps to assess the research questions: How effectively does responsive evaluation theory operate as an evaluation model? How does responsive evaluation theory articulate with systematic evaluation theories? Results indicate that responsive evaluation can be an effective model if evaluators consult program faculty and staff, who in turn express an interest in building a collaborative evaluation, and if the purpose of the evaluation is to examine process-oriented issues. Results further indicate that responsive and systematic evaluation models articulate well in that outcomes-oriented issues can be examined within the context of a responsive evaluation. Finally, results demonstrate that the responsive evaluation process can be highly politicized and, consequently, addresses the concerns of stakeholders to varying degrees.

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Jeffries, C., & Maeder, D. W. (2011). Comparing vignette instruction and assessment tasks to classroom observations and reflections. The Teacher Educator, 46(2), 161-175
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Sy, S. R., Gottfried, A. W., Gottfried, A. E. (2013). A transactional model of parental involvement and children's achievement from early childhood through adolescence.  Parenting: Science and Practice. 13, 133-152.

Abstract

Objective. The transactional relations between two types of parental home involvement, academic instruction and academic socialization, and children's reading achievement from early childhood through adolescence were examined in a longitudinal study. Academic instruction involves one-on-one interactions between parent and child that target the development of specific academic skills, and academic socialization involves parents' promotion of academic values, beliefs, and expectations. Design. The sample was based on an ongoing long-term longitudinal study, and included 122 children (approximately equal in gender) and their families. This study included data collected from ages 3 to 17 years, employing a variety of direct and indirect assessments Results. Findings showed that the two types of parental home involvement are distinct, related, and highly stable from early childhood through adolescence and both types of parental home involvement show transactional relationships with children's reading achievement over time. Conclusion.  This study contributes to the literature by elucidating the stability of parental academic instruction and socialization as well as their transactional relationships with children’s achievement within a single integrated model from early childhood through adolescence.

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