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Research

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Gottfried, A. E. (2011, April). Searching for Motivation from Childhood through Adulthood: Findings and Implications of a Longitudinal Investigation across Two Decades. Invited presentation at the 2011 Western Psychological Association Convention, Los Angeles.

Abstract

This presentation provided an overview of my research program on academic intrinsic motivation with regard to: developmental trends across the school years, the role of environment and parental motivational practices, and relationships to academic achievement.

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Foley, B., Castillo, K. & Kelly, K. (April 27, 2013) Clinical Teaching as Professional Development for Educational Technology: Thrown Into the Digital Deep End. Paper presented at the American Educational Research Association Meeting 2013, San Francisco, CA

Abstract

Much has been written about the value of clinical teaching experiences for teachers. This paper reports on a clinical teaching effort designed to help teachers learn to integrate cloud based computing into science classed (an instructional model called Computer Supported Collaborative Science, CSCS). A team of eight teachers was asked to teach a summer school class using CSCS and a specially designed curriculum. In addition to the class, teachers participated in daily reflection and planning meetings and kept a journal of their experiences. The experience was a challenge but provided a powerful learning experience for the teachers who became enthusiastic about the curriculum. The transfer from the clinical teaching to the regular classes proved to still be a challenge for teachers.

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Burstein, J. H. (2007). Down from the tower into the trenches: Redefining the role of       professor-in-residence in one professional development school. University-School             Partnerships, 1(2), 66-75.
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Chen, D., Klein, M.D, & Minor, L. (2009). Interdisciplinary perspectives in early intervention.Professional development in multiple disabilities through distance education. Infants & Young Children,22. 146-155.

Abstract

This article reviews the research on professional development of early intervention service providers. It examines the effectiveness of distance education methods to provide a three unit course that addressed home visiting, parent-child communication, sensory processing disorders, physical disabilties development, visual impairments, hearing loss, and embedding objectives within daily routines.

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Gottfried, A. E., Marcoulides, G. A., Gottfried, A. W., Oliver, P. (2009). A latent curve model of parental motivational practices and developmental decline in math and science academic intrinsic motivation. Journal of Educational Psychology, 101, 729-739.                                                                                               

Abstract

A longitudinal approach was used to examine the effects of parental task-intrinsic and task-extrinsic motivational practices on academic intrinsic motivation in the subject areas of math and science. Parental task-intrinsic practices comprise encouragement of children’s pleasure and engagement in the learning process, whereas task-extrinsic practices comprise parents’ provision of external rewards and consequences contingent on children’s task performance. A conditional latent curve model was fit to data from the Fullerton Longitudinal Study (A. W. Gottfried, A. E. Gottfried, & D. W. Guerin, 2006), with academic intrinsic motivation in math and science assessed from ages 9 to 17 and parental motivational practices measured when children were age 9. The results indicated that task-intrinsic practices were beneficial with regard to children’s initial levels of motivation at age 9 as well as with regard to motivational decline through age 17. Conversely, parents’ use of task-extrinsic practices was adverse with regard to children’s motivation both at age 9 and across the 8-year interval. Theoretical implications of the findings with regard to academic intrinsic motivation are discussed.



















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Burstein, J.H. (2009). Do as I Say and Do as I Do: Using the Professor-in-Residence Model in Teaching Elementary Social Studies Methods.  The Social  Studies. 121-127 
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Sheldon, C.Q., & Durdella, N.R. (2010, January-February). Success rates for students taking compressed and regular length developmental courses in the community college. Community College Journal of Research and Practice, 34(1/2), 39-54.

Abstract

In recent years, developmental education in the community colleges has received much attention. However, there has been little research examining the relationship between course length and course success in developmental education. Using historical enrollment data from a large, suburban community college in southern California, this study examines the relationship between course length and course success in developmental education when social and academic background characteristics are controlled. The study hypothesized that there would be no significant or practical difference in success rates for students taking compressed (i.e., courses less than eight weeks in length) or regular length developmental English, reading, or math courses when social or academic characteristics are controlled. Results demonstrate that developmental course length was associated with statistically and practically significant differences in course success observed across all categories of age, gender, and ethnicity. Students enrolled in compressed-format courses were more likely to succeed than students enrolled in regular-length courses. Higher successful course completion rates for compressed courses were observed across all departments, with the highest successful course completion rates in eight week format in English. Further, students—irrespective of age, race, or gender—were more likely to successfully complete compressed format courses than their counterparts in regular length courses. Findings point to an educational benefit for students who enroll in compressed courses. Future research in this area includes an examination of students’ progress through a sequence of developmental education courses and a look into the effect of college experience and environment factors related to success in compressed courses.

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Gottfried, Adele. E., et al. (2011). Motivational roots of leadership: A longitudinal study from childhood through adulthood. The Leadership Quarterly, 22, 510-519. In special issue of The Leadership Quarterly on “Longitudinal Investigations of Leader Development.”

Abstract

The present study elucidates developmental roots of leadership by investigating how motivation from childhood through adolescence is linked to motivation to lead in adulthood. Results showed considerable and significant continuity between academic intrinsic motivation and motivation to lead, indicating that adults with greater enjoyment of leadership per se, and who are motivated to lead without regard to external consequences, were significantly more intrinsically motivated from childhood through adolescence. Implications for developing motivation in leaders are advanced.

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Murawski, W.W., & Lochner, W.W. (2011). Observing co-teaching: What to look for, listen for, and ask for. Intervention in School and Clinic, 46(3), 174-183.

Abstract

Schools are becoming more inclusive in nature and many students with disabilities are having their needs met in the general education classrooms. Co-teaching is a service delivery option for meeting those needs. However, many administrators and supervisors do not have the skills or background for knowing how to observe and collect feedback. This article provides supervisors with clear guidelines on what to look for, listen for, and ask for to improve co-teaching outcomes.

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Gottfried, A. E., Marcoulides, G. A., Gottfried, A. W., & Oliver, Pamella. (2013). Longitudinal pathways from math intrinsic motivation and achievement to math course accomplishments and educational attainment.  Journal of Research on Educational Effectiveness, 6, 68-92.

Abstract

Across 20-years, pathways from math intrinsic motivation and achievement (ages 9 - 17) to high school math course accomplishments and educational attainment (age 29) were analyzed. Academic intrinsic motivation was the theoretical foundation. To determine how initial status and change in motivation and achievement related to course accomplishments and educational attainment, a latent curve model was fit to data from the Fullerton Longitudinal Study. Levels of motivation and achievement at 9 had positive, direct, and mutually indirect paths to course accomplishments.  Dual declines in motivation and achievement related to course accomplishments, directly for achievement, and indirectly for motivation via achievement.  Greater decline corresponded to fewer course accomplishments which in turn predicted, and served as a mediator to educational attainment.  Implications are discussed.

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Gainsburg, J. (2015). Engineering students’ epistemological views on mathematical methods in engineering. Journal of Engineering Education, 104(2), 139-166.    

Abstract

Background This study was motivated by the ubiquity and apparent usefulness of general epistemological development schemes, notably that of William J. Perry, Jr., in engineering education, but also by limitations that derive from their generality. Purpose/Hypothesis Empirical data were used to articulate engineering students’ epistemological views on the role of mathematical methods in engineering and to explore the fit of a stage-based developmental model to those data. Design/Method Data included interviews, think-aloud protocols, and classroom observations over a one-year period. Ten undergraduates and four instructors in a civil engineering program participated. A grounded-theory approach was used to identify levels of epistemological views. Perry’s scheme provided a starting framework. Skeptical reverence, the view veteran engineers hold regarding mathematics in engineering, which was previously identified by the author, was taken as a normative endpoint. All data were coded by view level and various contexts to detect students’ epistemological developmental patterns. Results This article proposes three categories of engineering students’ views on the role of mathematical methods in engineering: dualism, integrating, and relativism. Dualism and relativism reflect elements of Perry’s general categories, but integrating, a new category, diverges significantly from Perry’s middle category of multiplicity. No evidence supported a stage-based developmental model. Conclusions This empirically based scheme, while exploratory, provides further evidence that epistemological development differs across disciplines, and offers four levels of epistemological views held by engineering students on the role of mathematics in engineering. Conjectures about how to promote engineering students based on classroom observations, are also offered.

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Bhavsar, G.P., Grote, K.G., Galvan, M.C., Tyutina, S.V., Guan, S.A., Stapleton, L.D., & Knotts, G. (2018). Evaluation of first-year faculty learning communities on teaching effectiveness and scholarship: An exploratory study. Journal of Faculty Development, 32(2), 1-8. 

Abstract

Faculty in their early careers discover unique and unanticipated concerns in navigating academia and attempting to create life balance.  These needs must be addressed to ensure retention and success in the tenure process.  This exploratory study found the creation of first-year faculty learning communities (FLCs) provides needed, integral, and engaging support to encourage balance in teaching effectiveness, scholarship, and service and to increase confidence in comprehending a university’s tenure process.  More broadly, offices of faculty development on university campuses should prioritize long-term, evidence-based support to assist new faculty as they transition into the demands of a tenure-track position.

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Desrochers, C. (2009).  Magicians of the golden state: The CSU center director disappearing acts.  In L. B. Nilson (Ed.) To improve the academy: Vol 27. Resources for faculty, instructional, and organizational development (pp. 88-107).  Bolton, MA: Anker.

Abstract

The California State University (CSU) Teaching and Learning Center directors perform daily feats of magic, often culminating in one particularly dramatic trick at the end of the academic year—their own disappearing acts.  This chapter traces the history of the center director position in the CSU system, reports where directors go when they leave the position after only a few years, and proposes how frequent turnover might be reversed through organizational factors aimed at promoting retention of these Magicians of the Golden State.

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Gottfried, A. E. (in press) Motivation (Intrinsic, Extrinsic). In M. Bornstein, Ed.The SAGE Encyclopedia of Lifespan Human Development. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications                                                                                                            

Abstract

This chapter presents an overview of intrinsic vs. extrinsic motivation, developmental trends of such motivation across childhood through adulthood, and relationships to academic success.  The role of environment is presented with implications for practice.

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