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Research

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Gottfried, Adele. E., et al. (2011). Motivational roots of leadership: A longitudinal study from childhood through adulthood. The Leadership Quarterly, 22, 510-519. In special issue of The Leadership Quarterly on “Longitudinal Investigations of Leader Development.”

Abstract

The present study elucidates developmental roots of leadership by investigating how motivation from childhood through adolescence is linked to motivation to lead in adulthood. Results showed considerable and significant continuity between academic intrinsic motivation and motivation to lead, indicating that adults with greater enjoyment of leadership per se, and who are motivated to lead without regard to external consequences, were significantly more intrinsically motivated from childhood through adolescence. Implications for developing motivation in leaders are advanced.

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Murawski, W.W. & Spencer, S.A. (2011, Fall). The importance of collaboration in today's diverse schools. The LAUSD Ladder, 25, 35.

Abstract

This article highlights work from the book "Collaborate, communicate and differentiate" (2011) by Murawski & Spencer. It emphasizes ways for faculty to collaborate in order to meet the diverse needs of students.

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Techaviratanakul, D. & Murawski, W.W. (2012). Educational therapists seek to be healers in times of tight budgets. Kappan, 93(5), 48-50.

Abstract

As funding cuts require schools to do more with less, one main concern is how to continue high-quality learning. That’s an ever-more difficult proposition where students who have any of a variety of learning difficulties are involved. In such situations an educational therapist can be helpful.This article describes what educational therapy is and how educational therapists (ET) can be helpful in collaborating with schools.

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Gottfried, A et al. (2011). Paths from gifted motivation to leadership. In S. E. Murphy & R. J. Reichard (Eds.). Early Development and Leadership: Building the Next Generation of Leaders (pp. 71-91). New York: Psychology Press/Routledge.

Abstract

The research reported in this chapter indicates the strong positive role of students’ gifted academic intrinsic motivation with regard to undertaking leadership positions in high school extracurricular activities. Pathways from gifted motivation to leadership are discussed, as well as implications for developing student academic intrinsic motivation are advanced.

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Auerbach, S. (2012). Conceptualizing leadership for authentic partnerships: A continuum to inspire practice. In S. Auerbach (Ed.), School leadership for authentic family and community partnerships: Research perspectives for transforming practice (pp. 29-51). New York: Routledge.

Abstract

Despite rhetoric of collaboration, partnerships with families and community groups are rarely based on parity and common purpose. Schools typically set the agenda, positioning parents as deferential supporters and community groups as service providers. By contrast, authentic partnerships are respectful alliances among educators, families, and community groups that value relationship building, dialog across difference, and sharing power in socially just schools. This conceptual paper examines the literature on school leadership, family/community engagement, and education for social justice to problematize the term “partnerships,” argue for authentic partnerships, and offer a model of leadership for partnerships to inform practice.

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Murawski, W.W., Carter, N., Sileo, N., & Prater, M.A. (2012). Communicating and Collaborating with Families (Chp 3, pp.59-90). In N. Sileo and M.A. Prater (Eds)., Working with Families of Children with Special Needs: Family and Professional Partnerships and Roles. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.

Abstract

This book addresses the issues related to families and schools who work with students with special needs. The chapter focuses on how to establish best practices between family-school collaboration. It provides the research behind communication, problem-solving, conflict management, and collaboration.

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Gottfried, A. E. (2016). Intrinsic Motivation and Goals.  Invited chapter in H.  Friedman (Ed.) Encyclopedia of Mental Health, 2nd Edition. Vol 2, Waltham, MA: Academic Press, pp. 417-422.

Abstract

Academic intrinsic motivation concerns the enjoyment of learning for its own sake without receiving external rewards, and intrinsic motivation is recognized as being important for individuals’ well-being and mental health. From childhood through adulthood, a substantial body of research shows that academic intrinsic motivation is a significant factor with regard to academic and educational well-being.  Individuals with higher levels of academic intrinsic motivation evidence pervasively greater and consistently higher academic and educational competence, and leadership.  On the other hand, individuals with lower academic intrinsic motivation, fare less well, and may become at-risk for adverse outcomes.  Development of academic intrinsic motivation across childhood and adolescence is presented, and trends that contribute to both positive and negative long-term outcomes are discussed.  Finally, home and school environments play a role in the stimulation of academic intrinsic motivation, and suggestions for intervention are advanced.

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Understanding Leadership with Women Community College Executives
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Auerbach, S. (Ed.) (2012). School leadership for authentic family and community partnerships: Research perspectives for transforming practice. New York: Routledge.

Abstract

School leaders are increasingly called upon to pursue meaningful partnerships with families and community groups, yet many leaders are unprepared to meet the challenges of partnerships, to cross cultural boundaries, or to be accountable to the community. Alliances are needed among educators, families, and community organizations that value relationship building, dialog, and power-sharing as part of socially just schools. This book brings together research perspectives that intersect the fields of school leadership and parent/community involvement to examine the role of educational leaders in promoting partnerships and to both inform and inspire more authentic collaboration. Its 13 chapters cover recent studies on urban principals, community organizing, bicultural families, special education, charter schools, parent education/advocacy, and other topics in the U.S. and Canada.

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Murawski, W.W. & Dieker, L.A. (2013). Leading the co-teaching dance: Leadership strategies to enhance team outcomes. Arlington, VA: Council for Exceptional Children.

Abstract

This invaluable resource provides school leaders with the strategies, resources, best practices, techniques, and materials they will need to establish and maintain successful co-teaching teams in their schools. Murawski and Dieker draw on their own extensive experience and research to address the critical key factors: defining what co-teaching is and is not; understanding the menu of options and the benefits of co-teaching, the 5 keys to co-teaching and to leading co-teaching; developing the school culture and necessary structure to support co-teaching; scheduling strategies; planning strategies; implementing co-teaching and understanding co-instruction; observation and feedback; data collection; institutionalizing co-teaching; and disseminating your success.

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