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Research

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Burstein, J.H. & Kretschmer, D. (2008). Integrating Social Studies and Science:   Natural or Unnatural Fit? Social Studies Research and Practice, 3(3), 113-122.
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Jeffries, C. (2011). Thinking inside the box: Using discovery boxes and learning centers to promote inquiry and teach healthy food choices at the preschool level. Science and Children, 48(6), 30-34.
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Foley, B. J., & Reveles, J. M. (2014). Pedagogy for the connected science classroom: Computer supported collaborative science and the next generation science standards. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education, 14(4). Retrieved from http://www.citejournal.org/vol14/iss4/science/article1.cfm

Abstract

The prevalence of computers in the classroom is compelling teachers to develop new instructional skills. This paper provides a theoretical perspective on an innovative pedagogical approach to science teaching that takes advantage of technology to create a connected classroom. In the connected classroom, students collaborate and share ideas in multiple ways producing a record of work that is persistent and accessible via networked-based computing (i.e., “the cloud”). The instruction method, called Computer Supported Collaborative Science (CSCS), uses web-based resources to engage all learners in the collection, analysis, and collaborative interpretation of classroom data that turns hands-on classroom activities into authentic scientific experiences. This paper describes CSCS and how it corresponds to key parts of the Next Generation Science Standards.

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Jeffries, C. (2013). Thinking inside the box. In L. Froschauer (Ed.), A year of inquiry: A collection for elementary educators (pp. 118-123). Arlington, Virginia, NSTA Press.

Abstract

The authors conducted a test to determine whether they could incorporate a discovery box into a preschool setting was successful. It stimulated the students' natural inquiry processes while promoting understanding of healthy foods and allowing for practice of fine-motor skills. It was easily incorporated into the curriculum and classroom space. Since preschoolers are naturally curious, they tried to determine and predict how the tools and components worked. They inspected the materials and used the tools to measure, analyze, and create mental models. They also constructed their own explanations. This article describes the authors' experiences developing and setting up the discovery box learning activity center for preschoolers. (Contains 3 figures and 4 print resources.)

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