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Research

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McCollum, E., & Gehart, D. (2010). Using mindfulness to teach therapeutic presence: A qualitative outcome study of a mindfulness-based curriculum for teaching therapeutic presence to master’s level marriage and family therapy trainees. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 36, 347-360. doi: 10.1111/j.1752-0606.2010.00214.x

Abstract

This article describe the findings of a qualitative study on the effects of using mindfulness during the practicum experience in master's level marriage and family therapy program.

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Gehart, D. (2011). The core competencies in marriage and family therapy education: Practical aspects of transitioning to a learning-centered, outcome-based pedagogy. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 37, 344-354. doi: 0.1111/j.1752-0606.2010.00205.x

Abstract

This article describes a seven-step process for helping marriage and family therapy educators develop learning assessment systems in their programs to measure student mastery of the family therapy core competencies.

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Miller, J. K., & Stone, D. J. (2011). The Voices of Family Therapy Doctoral Students of Color: Aspirations and Factors Influencing Careers in Academia, Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development, 39(2), 101-113.

Abstract

"This study examines key factors influencing career aspirations of doctoral students of color from family therapy doctoral programs across the country, with a special focus on factors influencing the choice to pursue an academic career. Qualitative interviews with students at varying levels of degree completion revealed factors influencing career aspiration. Respondents discussed their views regarding the barriers to careers in academia as well as suggestions for overcoming those barriers."

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Caldwell, B. E., & Stone, D. J. (2016). Using scaling to facilitate ethical decision-making in family therapy. The American Journal of Family Therapy, 44(4), 198-210. doi:10.1080/01926187.2016.1150797 

Abstract

Ethical decision-making in family therapy is inherently complex, as it requires therapists to balance competing needs of multiple individuals and subsystems. Game theory offers a potential means of helping facilitate such decision-making, by encouraging attendance to the likely impact of various courses of action on individuals and subsystems as related to each of the core ethical principles underlying psychotherapeutic practice. This manuscript explores the potential use of game theory in family therapists’ ethical decision making through case examples. Benefits and risks of such an approach are reviewed.

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Gehart, D. (2010). Mastering competencies in family therapy: A practical approach to theory and clinical case documentation. Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole.

Abstract

The first outcome-based textbook in the field, Mastering Competencies in Family Therapy introduces graduate students to theories of family therapy using clinical documentation forms to enable students to learn practical, real-world skills to develop and demonstrate their knowledge. The book teaches students how to write case conceptualizations, clinical assessments, treatment plans, and progress notes and integrates evidence-based practices and diversity issues. Scoring rubrics for each of the learning assignments are provided to facilitate learning.

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Gehart, D. (2012). Mindfulness and acceptance in couple and family therapy. New York: Springer.