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Department of Pan African Studies

Resources

Contact

Pan African Studies
221 Santa Susana Hall
CSU Northridge
18111 Nordhoff Street
Northridge, CA 91330-8315

Hours: M-F (8 a.m. to 5 p.m)
Phone: (818) 677-3311
Fax: (818) 677-3619

panafricanstudies@csun.edu

 

Courses

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Lower Division

097. Developmental Reading (3 Units University credit; no credit toward graduation)

Course serves as a prerequisite to PAS 155, CHS 155, or ENG 155 for students scoring 141 or below on the reading section of English Placement Test. Intensive study of basic reading skills, focusing on the types of reading students will do in college. Students will be required to pass an exit examination before taking PAS 155, or equivalent. (Cross-listed with AAS, CHS, and ENGL 097.) (Credit/No Credit Only)

098. Basic Writing Skills (3 units University credit; no credit toward graduation)

A writing skills course designed for students who score between 141 and 150 on the EPT to develop skills in the writing of the essay. The course focuses on basic skills: the sentence, the rhetoric of the paragraph, with some mechanics and grammar. This course is also designed for the student who anticipates problems in a college-level composition course, and it is a prerequisite for PAS 155 for students who are placed in PAS 098. (Cross-listed with AAS, CHS, and ENGL 098.) (Credit/No Credit Only)

099. Writer's Workshop (1 unit University credit; no credit toward graduation)

A course emphasizing the development of the individual student's writing abilities with intensive practice in basic writing skills, including grammar, usage, and other aspects of the composing process. May be taken by any student who wishes to improve his/her writing skills, whatever the level. Two hours of laboratory per week. (Credit/No Credit Only)

100. Introduction to Black Culture (3 units)

An overview of the basic areas of Black culture, including history, religion, social organization, politics, economics, psychology, and creative production, with a survey of the key concepts and fundamental literature in each area. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies.)

110. Fundamentals of Business Organization and Management (3 units)

A survey of business functions in the African-American community. Enterprise management in the broadest sense, designed to integrate experience into a coherent, realistic approach to business organization and management. (Available for General Education, Applied Arts and Sciences.)

151. Freshman Speech Communication (3 units)

Prerequisite: EPT score of 151 or better.
An introduction to the study of the human communication process with an emphasis upon techniques of contemporary African-American rhetoric. Course will include intensive practice in public speaking, logical reasoning and critical listening. (Cross-listed with CHS 151 and COMS 151) (Available for General Education, Basic Subjects.)

155. Freshman Composition (3 units) (Formerly 150)

Prerequisites: EPT score of 151 or better or a grade of Credit in 097 and/or 098, if appropriate.
A directed writing course designed to teach students to write effectively in the Standard American dialect: to find facts to develop their ideas; to organize and present material clearly, logically, and persuasively; and to read multi-cultural expository prose critically and accurately. (Cross-listed with CHS and ENGL 155) (Available for General Education, Basic Subjects.)

158. LEARNING PARADIGMS IN PAN AFRICAN STUDIES (3 units)

This course is designed to explore and analyze paradigms of learning germane to the Pan African Studies discipline through intensive, interactive strategies in the classroom. The course will not only expose students to how others visualize the learning process but will encourage them to utilize these paradigms in their academic experience, be it skills acquisition of any variety (investigation, documentation, writing, managing time and resources, study strategies, and so on.) and mastering content-specific issues from other courses in which they may be enrolled.

161. American Political Institutions: A Black Perspective (3 units)

An examination of the development and dynamics of American political institutions and political processes as they relate to the experiences of African-Americans. (Meets Title V requirements for Constitution of the United States and California State and Local Government.)

165. Introduction to Pan-Africanism (3 units)

An examination of the origin and growth of the Pan-African Movement from the nineteenth century to the present time. A critical evaluation of major Pan-African ideologists and practitioners. The successes and failures of the Organization of African Unity from 1963 to the present time. Strongly recommended for all PAS majors and minors. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies.)

171. Classical African Civilization (3 units) (Same as HIST 145)

Classical African Civilization surveys the various great societies of Africa, covering a period from the origin of humankind in East Africa to the great Zulu Kingdom led by Chaka in the 19th century. In addition to describing the leadership, histories, and achievements of African figures like Imhotep, Zoser, Ahknaten, Muhammed, and Chaka, a great deal of attention is paid to understanding the cultures, technologies, and social organization of their respective societies.

201. Economics of the African-American Community I (3 units)

An introduction to the operation of the U.S. economy with special emphasis on the interrelationships between producers, consumers and governmental components. The emphasis of the course will be on the economic position and economic needs of the African American community within this system. (Available for General Education, Social Sciences.)

204. Race and Critical Thinking (3 units) (Formerly PAS 296R)

Prerequisite/Corequisite: : Completion of GE section A.1 (English Composition) and GE Section A.3 (College Math).
This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of deductive logic as a dimension of Critical Reasoning, and the practical usage of those concepts in discussing, analyzing, and critiquing ideas on race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation and other relevant issues of modern society.

210. Consumer Behavior in the Afro-American Community (3 units)

This course is aimed at the development of tools and concepts necessary for the rational allocation of consumer resources. The emphasis is on significant consumer decisions facing African-Americans. Government functions that affect consumers will be evaluated in the context of potential impact on personal decision making. (Available for General Education, Applied Arts and Sciences.)

220. Psychological Environment of the African-American (3 units)

A study of contemporary American society and its effects on the African-American community from the perspective of basic psychological concepts and theories. (Available for General Education, Social Sciences.)

221. Social Environment of the African-American (3 units)

A study of contemporary American society and its effects on the African-American community from the perspective of basic sociological concepts and theories. (Available for General Education, Social Sciences.)

222. Elements of the Human Geography of the African-American (3 units)

The geography of the African-American: customs, economics, social and political adjustments. (Available for General Education, Social Sciences.)

226. Traditional African Cultures (3 units)

A comprehensive overview of the African societies and cultures from the earliest times to the twentieth century. Case studies in ethnology, kinship and marriage, economic and political institutions, religion and philosophy, the arts, and the interaction between the traditional African cultures and the non-African cultures. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies.)

244. African-American Literature to 1930 (3 units)

A survey of the literature of African-Americans from 1770 to 1930, analyzing their literary development within a historical context to gain insight into the fullness of the impact of America on African-American life. The course includes writings of enslaved Africans and freedpersons, the novels and poetry of the post-Emancipation period, the writings of the period 1920-1930 commonly referred to as the Harlem Renaissance, and the work of writers in the Caribbean and in South America from the time of the Haitian Revolution.

245. African American Literature Since 1930 (3 units)

An introduction to major African American authors from 1930 to the present. The work of Richard Wright, Margaret Walker, Gwendolyn Brooks, Ralph Ellison, John Killens, James Baldwin and LeRoi Jones will be studied as well as the works of writers who formed the Black Arts Movement which flourished during the 1970's. The course will focus on understanding the dynamics of African American life through an analysis of the literature. (Available for General Education, Humanities.)

246. Introduction to African-American Drama (3 units)

A chronological survey of the major works of representative African American dramatists from 1925 to the present, with particular focus on their techniques, their ideas, and on the cultural milieu in which the works are produced. (Available for General Education, Humanities.)

271. African-American History to 1865 (3 units)

A survey course examining the themes and issues in the history of the African peoples in America up to 1865. (Meets Title V requirements in American History, Institutions and Ideals.)

272. African-American History since 1865 (3 units)

A survey course in African-American history covering the period 1865 to the present. The course will include the reconstruction era, post-reconstruction, the Negro Renaissance, The Civil Rights Movement, and Black Nationalism. (Meets Title V requirements in American History, Institutions and Ideals.)

274. History of Caribbean Societies Since 1830's (3 units)

An historical approach to an analysis of the political, social and economic development of the Caribbean islands after the 1830's. The general focus of this course will be centered on post-emancipation colonialism and the development of a particular form of neo-colonialism that manifested itself after independence. The course also includes an examination of the emergence of contemporary radical political movements.

280. Workshop in Creative Writing for Minority Students (3 units)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement.
An introductory workshop in minority creative writing. Students will experiment with the three genres: prose fiction, drama, and/or poetry. In addition, students will have the opportunity to meet and work with distinguished professional minority writers. Students should consult with the instructor about the semester syllabus and the minority literature concentration. (Cross-listed with ENGL 280 and CHS 280.) (Available for General Education, Humanities.)

282. African Religion in the New World (3 units)

A survey examination of religion as practiced by Africans once removed from their homeland of Africa. Major emphasis will be placed on the importance of religion to the development of African culture in the new world. (Available for General Education, Humanities.)

Upper-Division Courses

300. Contemporary Issues in the African-American Community (3 units)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower-division writing requirement. An in-depth exploration of the social, political, cultural, and economic issues in the African-American community. Provides insight on the extent to which these issues affect the Black individual and family in their interaction with majority American society. (Available for Section B of the Multicultural Requirement for Credential Candidates and for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies.)

301. Economics of the African-American Community II (3 units)

A study of the household as a consuming unit and the firm as a producing unit, exploring factor costs, price determinatives and income distribution, with emphasis on the African-American community and its lack of control over the means of production.

311. Black Psychology (3 units) (Formerly 343)

An examination of the major theories and research by black scholars addressing the development of a Black Psychology. Comparisons and contrasts are made with "Traditional" Psychology. A Pan Africanist perspective is taken, i.e., African, Caribbean, etc.

320. African-American Personality Development (3 units)

Prerequisite: PAS 220 and/or an introductory course in Psychology and completion of the lower-division writing requirement.
A study of the psychological manifestations of oppression of the African-American. Emphasis on the understanding and analysis of psychological stress, the assessment of this phenomenon and discussion of the solutions for the creation of a positive self-concept in the African-American people. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies.)

322. African-American Family (3 units)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower-division writing requirement.
Course summarizes structural evaluation and role formation of the family. Presents an overview of the traditional African family and socialization process. Focuses on the impact of slavery and post-slavery institutions on the formation of the Black family in America. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies.)

324. The Black Woman in Contemporary Times (3 units)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement.
Examines the social, political and psychological forces impacting the lives of Black women and focuses on their expectations, opportunities, problems and goals in contemporary society. Also, studies the Black woman's contribution to the family and the community. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies.)

325. The Black Man in Contemporary Times (3 units)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement.
Examines the social, political, and psychological forces affecting the lives of Black men and focuses on their expectations, opportunities, problems, and goals in contemporary society. The contributions of the Black man and his relationships to the family, the community, and to American society are studied. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies.)

331. African-American Religious Music: History and Literature (2 units)

A study and analysis of African-American religious music beginning with the work and signal songs of slavery and continuing to the present.
Must be taken concurrently with PAS 331L

331L. Gospel Laboratory (1 unit) (Formerly 363L)

Study and rehearsal techniques of gospel music, hymns, spirituals, and anthems. Designed as a laboratory experience for gospel musicians, choir directors as well as singers.
Must be taken concurrently with PAS 331

332. African-American Music I (3 units) (Formerly 364)

An historical analysis of African-American music, from its beginnings in Africa until its flowering in New Orleans.

333. Coltrane (3 units) (Formerly 366)

An analysis of styles and the evolution of the spiritual eminence of his works of art. The outgrowth of a new form and the influence of AVANT-GARDE music as it gradually transforms into NEO-CLASSICISM.

337. Black Images on the Silver Screen (3 units)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower-division writing requirement.
An in-depth exploration of the history and criticism of the Black image on the American screen and the social and political background from which the African-American image has developed. Technical (how a film is composed) and critical (the meaning that can be drawn from those compositions) perspectives will be emphasized. (Available for General Education, Applied Arts and Sciences.)

344. Literature of the Caribbean and African Experience (3 units)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement.
This course examines the literature of people in Africa and the Caribbean. It establishes the theoretical, historical, cultural and imagistic framework within which the literature operates. An analysis is also undertaken of the literature thematically with respect to both their comparative experiences and their specifically different backgrounds. (Available for General Education, Humanities.)

345. African-American Autobiography (3 units)

An analysis of the thematic patterns in autobiographies from the slave narrative through the present focusing on the continuity of the African-American experiences from a psychological, sociological and historical point of view.

346. Contemporary Black Female Writers (3 units)

Prerequisites: PAS 155, CH S 155, or ENGL 155 and completion of the lower division writing requirement.
Study of selected works by contemporary Black women writers, including Alice Walker, Toni Morrison, Ntazake Shange, and Maya Angelou. Themes explored include correcting the image, movement from masking to self-revelation, male-female relationships, and search for wholeness. (Available for General Education, Humanities.)

350. Advanced Writing (3 units)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement.
An advanced course emphasizing alternative strategies in expository writing skills development. Its focus is on such purposeful forms of discourse as reports, the research paper, critiques, the essay examination, and selected forms of correspondence. A cursory review of grammar, mechanics and syntax will be offered as needed. More intensive review will be available in the Writing Center on an individualized basis. This course, though equivalent to, is not a substitute for English 305 or Business 305.

355. Black World News Practicum (3 units)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower-division writing requirement.
Supervised work on newsletter published three times a semester. Students work as writer reporters, photographers and editors. Includes analysis of Black urban press and Black college newspapers.

361. African-American Politics (3 units)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower-division writing requirement.
An upper-division introduction to the politics of the African-American, including political socialization, voting, interest groups, political parties and the political behavior within the sub-cultural context. (Available for General Education, Social Sciences.)

364. Politics of Non-Violent Direct Action (3 units)

An examination of the theory and practice of non-violent direct action. The theoretical perspective as well as the practical applications as implemented by William Wipple, Gandhi, Albert Luthuli, Martin Luther King, Jr., and others will be examined.

366. Colonialism in Africa (3 units)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower-division writing requirement.
A comprehensive overview of the motives of the European colonizers of Africa and the methods which they used in their colonial pursuits. The consequences of the colonization of Africa and the slave trade. The African liberation movements. Case studies of colonialism in specific regions and/or specific countries. (Available for General Education, Comparative Cultural Studies.)

PAS 368: The Politics of Hip-Hop Culture (3 units)

This course traces the cultural and political history of Hip-Hop and the impact it has had on Black and Latina/o youth culture, North American society, and global culture
industries in general.

376. African Enslavement in the New World (3 units)

This course is a comparative study of African Enslavement in the Caribbean, Latin America and the United States and examines various patterns of enslavement in Africa, Brazil, Latin America, the West Indies and North America. The course includes the examination of the Transatlantic Slave Trade, and the origins of New World Enslavement. The course also explores the different approaches to abolition and the nature of the emancipation (freedom in the New World). (Cross-listed with HIST 355)

382. Traditional Religions of Africa (3 units)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower-division writing requirement.
A comprehensive overview of the religious concepts, beliefs and practices of the Africans in their traditional socio-cultural milieu, including the interaction of the traditional African religions, Christianity and Islam. Includes case studies of the religions of selected African ethnic groups. (Available for General Education, Humanities.)

386. African-American Philosophical Thought (3 units)

A survival study of African-American philosophies. Course will include an analysis of selected traditional western philosophies and their relevance to the Black experience.

391. Psychological Foundations of Education (Elementary) (3 units)

An overview of the development of African-American children from preschool to adolescence. The course will explore the psychological perspective on learning, development, and instruction. Forty hours of field work required. (Not applicable for any credential program.)

392. Sociological Foundations of Education (Elementary) (3 units)

An introduction to the social and philosophical foundations of elementary education. Analysis of various proposals regarding the purpose, structure, and conduct of elementary education. Emphasis on the African-American child as her/his particular situation differs from other ethnic and racial groups. Course includes a minimum of thirty hours of field activities. (Not applicable for any credential program.)

392A-Z. Field Work in the African-American Community (3 units)

A course designed to give the student a working knowledge of the African-American community, including its culture, its problems, and the current efforts to solve problems in the community.

395. Bilingualism in the African-American Community (3 units)

Prerequisite: Completion of the lower division writing requirement.
Explores the genesis of African-American linguistic patterns with a focus on acquisition of Ebonics as a socio-cultural linguistic phenomenon. (Available for Section C of the Multicultural Requirement for Credential Candidates.)

397. Educational Systems of Africa (3 units)

An analysis, a discussion and an evaluation of the educational goals and practices of selected representative nations in Sub-Saharan Africa. A consideration of the problems related to the role of education as a vehicle of social, economic and political transformation of the developing African states.

417. Equity and Diversity in Schools (3 units)

Prepares teacher candidates to examine principles of educational equity,d i v e r s i t y, and the implementation of curriculum content and school practices for elementary/secondary students. Focuses on the history and culture of a specific ethnic experience and a comparative analysis made with other ethnic groups in California. Engages students to examine, critique, and reflect on their personal biases regarding children of color.

420. The Black Child (3 units)

Prerequisites: Completion of the lower division writing requirement.
An exploration of African-American childhood socialization dynamics through an examination of the forces of constraints and development. Theories of social development and achievement are examined. (Available for Section A of the Multicultural Requirement for Credential Candidates.)

421. Strategies for Black Child Development (3 units)

Prerequisites: PAS 420 or 322.
An application of the sociology of development as a conceptual framework for African-American development. Strategies of Black community services for the Black child are studied. Theoretical guidelines for program planning are explored. In addition basic professional skills for community work are reviewed.

447. African-American Theatre (3 units)

A critical analysis of the African-American Theatre as an art form and as a vehicle of change. Course covers the history and function of the African-American Theatre and many other aspects of theatre art, from playwriting to basic acting exercises. Often, a play is produced.

451. Mass Communication in the African-American Community (3 units)

Prerequisite: A grade of B or better in PAS 151 or permission of instructor.
An historical analysis of the role played by the mass media in the Afro-American community from slavery to contemporary times. Particular attention will be given to evaluating the African-American press.

465. Pan-Africanism: Development of an Ideology 1865-1954 (3 units)

This course takes an in-depth look at the theoretical nexus that spawned anti-colonialism and African independence from the mid-nineteenth century to the present.

466A&B. Model Organization of African Unity (3 units each)

A-The United Nations, The Organization of African Unity, and Africa
B-Model Organization of African Unity Practicum
This is a 2-part course (students may choose to take one or both segments, each counting as one course) which provides a practical set of activities of students to apply the principles of international diplomacy and pan Africanism to specific academic projects. Students will get the opportunity to travel to a national conference in Washington, D.C.; to organize a students leadership conference; to coordinate a student panel discussion for TV broadcast; to interview African diplomats, and other such activities.

484. Afro-American Belief and Western Christianity (3 units)

Prerequisite: PAS 282, or 382, or RS 100, or 200, or 210, or consent of instructor.
An examination of the major tenets of Black-American folk belief systems/theology and the major strands ("Liberal" & "Conservative") of Western Christian thought, together with a comparison of the images and ideas of each.

486SOC. Social Science Career Internship (3 units)

Prerequisites: Upper division standing in a social or behavioral science major, appropriate methods course as specified by the department, and consent of the instructor.
Social and behavioral science principles will be applied to the work place. At least nine hours per week of supervised fieldwork is required. Students will complete learning contracts and submit written reports related to their internships. (Cross-listed with GEOG, POLS, PSY, and SOC 486SOC.) (See section on Academic Internships in the Course Catalog.)

487. Pan-African Philosophical Thought (3 units)

A study of the attitudes between Africans across tribal, national, socio-cultural, linguistic and other lines. An explication of the economic, social, and political aspirations of people of African descent from c. 1400 A.D. to the present, including the doctrine of their universal brotherhood and common destiny.

496A-Z. Experimental Courses in Pan-African Studies (3 units)

Experimental courses in Pan-African Studies with course content to be determined.

496S. The Politics Of Hip Hop(3 units)

Critical examination of the political and cultural dynamics of Hip-Hop. Using standards of evaluation set forth by scholars of cultural studies, African American politics, and Hip-Hop activists, students explore the inter-relationship between African American youth and society through the medium of Hip-Hop, in particular, the connection between the Hip-Hop community and the various political, corporate and institutional actors that locally and globally influence society. Explores the real and perceived political, social, and marketing power of Hip-Hop whose political consequences will be considered in the realm of public policy. Special emphasis is placed on the impact of Hip-Hop on African-American identity, culture, and politics, while recognizing its national and global impact on other ethnicities.

498. Proseminar in Pan-African Studies (3 units)

This course is primarily restricted to students majoring in Pan-African Studies, but it is open to other interested students with the permission of the instructor. This course is the capstone course for the PAS major and will usually be taken during the final semester before baccalaureate graduation. It will focus on a synthesis of the information, concepts, material, and methodologies provided in the previous PAS classes, and it will provide students with intensive practice in utilizing that data in theoretical analysis and other evaluative activities.

499. Independent Study (1-3 units)

Graduate Courses

The following courses are available for students in the Interdisciplinary Masters Program.

590A. Advanced Afro-American World Experience (3 units)

Prerequisite: Senior level or Graduate Student standing.
This course is a seminar in the global dimensions of the Afro-American experience. It focuses on a knowledge of the African continent and on the intellectual linkages between Afro-Americans and Africa.

590B. Afro-American History Seminar (3 credits)

Prerequisite: Senior level or Graduate Student standing.
This course is a seminar in exploring and analyzing the African diaspora from the writings of great political, historical and literary thinkers. This class covers several dimensions of intensive analysis and evaluation of such work. Student research papers from this class should be publishable.

595A-Z. Experimental Topics Courses (3 credits)

Selected topics in Pan African Studies course content to be determined.

600. Seminar in Pan African Research Methodologies (3 credits)

Prerequisite: Conditional or Classified graduate status, or consent of the instructor.
This course provides students with a thorough, intensive exploration of current theories and methodological techniques relevant to serious research on the African Diasporan World. Students will analyze previous research, do their own projects, and participate in group discussion regarding research issues.

601. Seminar in Applied Public Policy Issues & the Black Urban Experience (3 credits)

Prerequisite: Conditional or Classified Graduate Status, or consent of the instructor.
This is a course in applied comparative public policy analysis and its consequences. The course will look at selected urban environments in the U.S., in South America and the Caribbean, and in continental Africa in terms of the urban Black population in those areas. How are public policy decisions which impact those populations made? Who makes them? How and to what degree do those decisions affect the political and economic well-being of those populations?

602. Special Topics in Black Aesthetics & Black Political Economy (3 credits)

Prerequisite: Conditional or Classified graduate status, or consent of the instructor.
This is a course in research and theoretical/paradigmatic analysis designed for students to prepare serious scholarly papers to present at conferences and academic meetings, and/or to submit for academic publication.

  1. Reading the African Novel
    • Reading the African Drama
    • An analytical Compendium of African American Fiction During the 20th Century
    • African American Drama Since 1950
  2. African Independence: An Analysis After 45 Years
    • Africentrism and the New World Order
    • Pan Africanism in the 21st Century
  3. The Political Economy of Underdevelopment in the Diaspora
    • The Political Economy of Law and Blacks in the Diaspora
    • The Political Economy of Blacks in the Electoral Process