2004 Preconference Workshops

MONDAY, March 15, 2004: Choose ONE of 10 full day (6 hr) workshops
TUESDAY, March 16, 2004: Choose ONE of 10 full day (6 hr) workshops

Come Early... Learn More!

Due to the popularity of the Preconference Workshops and the limited seating, we strongly recommend that you preregister by the "Early Bird" deadline of February 20, 2004


    Monday, March 15, 2004 ~ Full Day (6 hr.) Workshops, 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM

  1. Computer Access And Applications For People With Disabilities: Technology And Service Delivery


  2. Introduction To Accessible HTML Authoring For Users Of Adaptive Technology


  3. PowerPoint: Pushing It To The Limit


  4. Language, Literacy, And Learning: Putting It All Together For Beginning Readers


  5. Learning Disabilities Through The Life Span: Assessment, Identification, Intervention In Order To Reach Full Potential


  6. Implementing Section 508 At The State Level: The Why's And How To's


  7. Overview Of Assistive Technology


  8. Developing A Fully Accessible Postsecondary Campus


  9. CANCELLED


  10. Creative Strategies For Funding Assistive Technology (AT) Devices In A Challenging Economy


  11. Tuesday, March 16, 2004 ~ Full Day (6 hr.) Workshops, 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM

  12. Exploring Features And Functionality Of Accommodations For The Visually Impaired


  13. Assistive Technology And Autism


  14. Achieving Web Accessibility With Section 508


  15. Mac OS X Accessibility And Universal Learning


  16. Overview Of Augmentative And Alternative Communication Systems


  17. Making Learning Active: Simple Adaptations For Young Children And Children Functioning At Young Levels


  18. U.S. Federal Government Initiatives: Using Technology To Increase Employment Of People With Disabilities


  19. Learning Disabilities Through The Life Span: Matching Technology Solutions


  20. The Assistive Technology Assessment Process


  21. Assistive Technology Use By Persons Who Are Deaf Or Hard Of Hearing

PRECONFERENCE WORKSHOPS OF MONDAY, MARCH 15, 2004

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Monday, March 15, 2003 ~ 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Room: Atlanta/Boston - Marriott
A) Computer Access And Applications For People With Disabilities: Technology And Service Delivery

Computers are essential tools and computer literacy a mandatory skill. For many people with disabilities, computer access may need to be adapted and computer applications carefully selected to address abilities and goals. This introductory workshop will address a wide scope of access technologies and educational, vocational, recreational and communication applications, as well as implementation strategies and resources. Attendees will gain knowledge in: applications that are used for people with disabilities in educational, vocational, community or home environments; major approaches for computer access; major components of computer systems that enhance access and applications for people with disabilities; operating system features that effect access and applications for people with disabilities; keyboard alternatives, mouse emulation, on-screen keyboards, speech recognition, single switch access, internet access, AAC device characteristics, and adaptive computer output.

Peggy Barker, MS, ATP is an Assistive Technology Consultant from Northern California. She provides assistance and training to support the implementation of assistive technology for computer access, curriculum adaptation, augmentative communication, electronic aids for daily living, independent mobility and the integration/packaging of these systems. Peggy has worked in the field of AT for over 25 years. For 14 years, she was the Chief of the Communication/Control Service in the Rehabilitation Engineering Center at the Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford where she was involved in service delivery, training and research and development projects addressing person/technology interface, communication systems and power mobility systems. Peggy was a member of the RESNA Board of Directors (1998-2003) and helped develop, and presents RESNA's Fundamentals in Assistive Technology course.


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Monday, March 15, 2003 ~ 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Room: Chicago/Dallas - Marriott
B) Introduction To Accessible HTML Authoring For Users Of Adaptive Technology

This workshop will provide users of assistive technology with an opportunity to gain basic skills in web design, HTML mark up and accessible authoring practices. The workshop will include instruction on basic page structure and formatting of content, as well as insertion of lists, tables, hyperlinks and graphical elements. Attendees will gain knowledge in: using HTML mark-up language to create a basic HTML page structure using a text-based editing interface; adding headers and text content to a web page with formatting of style, paragraphs and horizontal rules; creating lists in numbered and bullet style within a web page; formatting simple table with row and column headers within a web page; adding hyperlinks to other web sites, web pages or other points within a single web page; inserting graphical images to a web page, including ALT and long descriptions; and understanding usability and accessibility issues related to effective, inclusive web design.

Laurie Harrison, ME has been involved in numerous projects involving accessible web design to ensure inclusion of users with disabilities at the Adaptive Technology Resource Centre, University of Toronto. Laurie has acted as coordinator of the highly innovative SNOW project (Special Needs Opportunity Windows), developing resources to support educators of students with disabilities, including web-based courses and workshops. Specific areas of interest include web accessibility and evaluation, product reviews, recommendations and development input for accessible online learning environments, authoring tools and curriculum resources. Laurie has a Masters of Education in Adult Education, and currently holds the position of Education Coordinator at the Centre. She has presented and published many times on the topic of access to web-based resources for people with disabilities.

Jan Richards is a User Interface Design Specialist at the Adaptive Technology Resource Centre of the University of Toronto. He has extensive experience with web content creation and web accessibility issues. He is an editor of the WAI Authoring Tools Group and a consultant to the Web-Savvy service. Jan has a leadership role in the Canadian Network for Inclusive Culture Exchange (CNICE), and Opportunities for Canadian Deaf Youth through Broadband Web Applications.


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Monday, March 15, 2003 ~ 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Room: Denver - Marriott
C) PowerPoint: Pushing It To The Limit

This workshop will provide attendees the opportunity to learn operations of PowerPoint that take it beyond a presentation tool. This hands-on workshop will go in-depth into PowerPoint, demonstrating how it can be utilized as an application to create multi-media curricular materials, training tools for dynamic display communication systems, and/or electronic literacy resources. Attendees will gain knowledge in: using PowerPoint as an assistive technology application; simulating scanning in PowerPoint; create links and utilize PowerPoint in a non linear format; and creating animations within a project.

Scott Marfilius has been working with individuals with disabilities for the past 22 years. The past 16 years has involved implementing assistive technology at various levels. First within an integrated classroom as a classroom teacher, then implementing a district wide system change within a Public School System by assisting their District Wide Team. He continues to assist teams and individuals in assessing students assistive technology needs. His teaching certifications are in Early Childhood Handicap, Cognitive Disabilities, Emotional Disability, and Learning Disability. He also consults with individuals and businesses to determine adaptations that are needed in work place settings. Scott's focus areas in assistive technology include computer access, and technologies that assist those with cognitive and learning disabilities.

Kelly S. Fonner, MS, has been working with individuals with disabilities since the mid 70s and has 19 years of experience in assistive technology. Her teaching experiences have been as a classroom aide, teacher and instructional media specialist in early childhood, preschool and school age programs. Kelly has consulted to university and adult programs concerning access to computers by persons with disabilities. She has a BS in special education, and an MS in educational technology and is currently working towards her PhD in urban education. Kelly worked as a consultant with PennTech, the state-wide e\technology project supported by the Pennsylvania Department of Education.


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Monday, March 15, 2003 ~ 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Room: Imperial A/B - Marriott
D) Language, Literacy, And Learning: Putting It All Together For Beginning Readers

This workshop focuses on creative, interactive ways to adapt and use stories, music, and phonemic awareness activities to scaffold literacy and language learning for emergent or beginning readers of all ages, including AAC users. Attendees will gain knowledge in: discriminating between three types of stories (emergent / transitional / conventional) and apply that learning in analyzing texts, light tech and high tech strategies for adapting books for students with disabilities; helping students engage in multiple readings of books; identifying strategies for modifying or creating texts for older students who are beginning readers; identifying light tech or high tech strategies for using music to support literacy and language learning; and developing strategies for supporting students in phonemic awareness.

Caroline Musselwhite, PhD is an assistive technology specialist with more than 25 years of experience working with children and adolescents with severe disabilities in a variety of settings, including Head Start, developmental day programs, and the public schools. She has also taught courses at several universities, including Northeastern University, West Virginia University, and Western Carolina University. Dr. Musselwhite has authored a number of textbooks and "how-to" books on a range of topics, including: Can We Chat (with Linda Burkhart), Emergent Literacy Success, Communication Programming for Persons with Severe Handicaps, Reading Activities Project for Older Students (RAPS), Adaptive Play, and Mini-Grants and Volunteers. She has also authored a number of software programs for children with disabilities, such as R.APS, Sequenced Social Scripts, and Poetry Power. Dr. Musselwhite is a founding member of the Board of Directors for the International Society for Augmentative and Alternative Communication.


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Monday, March 15, 2003 ~ 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Room: Imperial C - Marriott
E) Learning Disabilities Through The Life Span: Assessment, Identification, Intervention In Order To Reach Full Potential

This workshop focuses upon the utilization of a Neuropsychological framework for the assessment of learning disabilities to promote understanding of individual strengths and weaknesses, as well as facilitating appropriate interventions, compensatory strategies, and accommodations. Attendees will gain knowledge regarding: cogent areas of the field of LD; differentiation between types of learning disabilities; functional limitations related to diagnosis; and selection of appropriate assessment tools to be utilized for a diagnosis. At the conclusion of this workshop, attendees will be able to compare and contrast various specific learning disability diagnoses, identify appropriate accommodations and compensatory strategies.

Jennifer C. Zvi, PhD has held the position of Learning Disability Specialist at California State University, Northridge since 1986. She received her PhD in 1973 in the field of Learning Disabilities from Northwestern University and her Post doctorate in Neuropsychology from UCLA in 1985. Dr. Zvi is the current President of the Los Angeles Branch of the International Dyslexia Association, and is a member of the Los Angeles Chapter of Women In Business. Dr. Zvi is on the Faculty Senate at CSUN, and teaches in the Department of Special Education and the Department of Psychology. Dr. Zvi has presented on the subject of Learning Disabilities at many international conferences and has also published in this field.


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Monday, March 15, 2003 ~ 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Room: Imperial E/F - Marriott
F) Implementing Section 508 At The State Level: The Whys And How To's

This workshop will give an overview of Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act and it's relation to state governments. The workshop will identify what states are doing in terms of adopting and implementing 508-based initiatives and will focus on specific strategies, policies and practices that have been adopted. Federal efforts to implement Section 508 will be highlighted as transferable practices for state and local governments. This workshop is intended for persons interested in advocating for and implementing 508 activities at the state level, and federal government agencies and industry representatives that want to better position themselves to market to state governments. Attendees will gain knowledge in: the identification and description of Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act and it's applicability to state government; the current state of adoption and implementation of Section 508 at the state level; factors that should be considered and the components that should be addressed in the development of a web access policy to improve the likelihood of a successful implementation; strategies for implementing 508 at the state level, including developing a state policy and procedures, implementation and identification of strategies; and methodologies and practices to procure accessible electronic and information technology.

Deborah V. Buck, MS has over 20 years experience working in the field of disability and technology. Deborah is the Director of State IT Accessibility Initiatives, with the Information Technology Technical Assistance and Training Center (ITTATC), at Georgia Institute of Technology. Prior to joining the ITTATC Project, Ms. Buck was the Accessibility Program Manager at the NYS Office for Technology where she was responsible for accessibility-related policy and program. She holds a MS, Rehabilitation Counseling from the University at Albany, NY and a BA, Sociology from Bishops University, Lennoxville, PQ, Canada.

Fred DiFiore has over 25 years experience as an information technology professional in technical and management positions in the military, academia, and the federal sector. His specialty is implementing and managing IT-related, corporate-wide programs. As the Section 508 Coordinator, Fred reviews and approves major procurement, software development documentation, internet and intranet postings, and training modules for accessibility compliance requirements. He has developed training programs to help his users and managers understand and meet the requirements of the law, the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) and the Federal Accessibility Standard, and has implemented stringent processes for internet and intranet development bringing benefit to disabled individuals working in the agency and to those disabled members of the public that need to access Patent and Trademark systems for information.

Kathleen Anderson has worked for the Connecticut State Comptroller's Office for more than 19 years and is currently the Webmaster for the State of Connecticut Core-CT project, Connecticut state government's project to replace its legacy core financial and administrative systems with an integrated Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) package. Kathleen is a member of the W3C WAI Education & Outreach Working Group and the ICDRI (International Center for Disability Resources on the Internet) Advisory Board.

Diane Golden, PhD is the Director of Missouri Assistive Technology and has served as chairperson of the Association of Tech Act Projects (ATAP) the national organization of state assistive technology programs. Dr. Golden represented ATAP on the Electronic and Information Technology Access Advisory Committee providing recommendations to the Access Board for the Section 508 rules. Dr. Golden holds a doctorate in Special Education Administration, a Masters degree in Audiology, and a Bachelors degree in Speech Pathology. Prior to becoming the Director of Missouri Assistive Technology, Dr. Golden worked as the Assistant Director of Special Education for the state of Missouri.

Harry Leibowitz has over 20 years experience as an information technology professional. His SSA career began in 1966 in claims operations and he moved to the Office of Systems in the early 1980's when the first PCs were entering government service. For the past 20 years he has had a number of increasingly responsible positions in the SSA systems area. His major contributions include working on the teams developing and implementing SSA's national LAN infrastructure and establishing two major SSA Teleservice Centers. In 1992 he began to work on SSA's Employees with Disabilities Program. This program supplies accessible information technology hardware and software to SSA's disabled employees. He migrated to the newly formed Section 508 team in 2000 and has made a number of significant contributions to SSA's Section 508 compliance initiatives. He is currently the alternate to SSA's Section 508 Accessibility Coordinator.


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Monday, March 15, 2003 ~ 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Room: Marquis 1 & 2 - Marriott
G) Overview Of Assistive Technology

This workshop will provide an overview of assistive technology (AT) in it's broadest terms to include an array of subtopics within AT: Legislation/Funding, team building and collaboration, " The Fundamental Assessment Process", leadership, importance of low-tech, light-tech and high-tech options, AT trends, assessment, resources, and categories of assistive technology devices. This workshop is designed for persons new to the field of AT and new to the CSUN "Technology and Persons with Disabilities" conference. Attendees will gain knowledge in: the identification and description of different pieces of current and past legislation that has impacted AT procurements; identification and description of important aspects of team building and collaboration in an AT Team; the 10 steps of the Fundamental Assessment Process (FAP); key features of different categories of AT products; and resources available through the Internet, product developers, and through networking.

Harry "Bud" Rizer, EdD, ATP, is Director of the Center on Disabilities at CSUN. Dr. Rizer was formerly the Director of the T.K. Martin Center on Technology and Disability at Mississippi State University and the Coordinator of the Technology Resource Office at the Maryland Rehabilitation Center in Baltimore. He has taught computer and adaptive technology courses for over ten years at The Johns Hopkins University where he received his doctorial degree. He has been involved in the field of rehabilitation for 27 years and assistive technology for over 20 years. He is a long time member of RESNA and is certified as an Assistive Technology Practitioner. Dr. Rizer has presented extensively throughout the United States and abroad.

Janie Cirlot-New, MS, CCC-SLP, is the Director of the T.K. Martin Center for Technology and Disability at Mississippi State University. The T.K. Martin Center is a university based center whose staff provides comprehensive, multi-disciplinary evaluations to remove limitations through the application of assistive technology, allowing individuals to participate in educational, vocational and leisure activities to the fullest degree they choose. As director Janie supervises a clinical staff of thirteen including Rehabilitation and Biomedical Engineers, Occupational Therapists, Speech-language Pathologists, and Special Educators. Janie is a Speech-language Pathologist and has provided augmentative and alternative communication services to individuals of all ages.


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Monday, March 15, 2003 ~ 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Room: Marquis 3 - Marriott
H) Developing A Fully Accessible Postsecondary Campus

Using the nationally recognized model of AT services developed at Oregon State University, attendees will explore in a very interactive session the complex process of developing a comprehensive assistive technology program designed for the entire campus community. Attendees will gain knowledge in: the complexities involved in a postsecondary program development; understanding of the implementation process for universal design principals and practices; skills and techniques to conduct a comprehensive technology audit; and understanding of the legal requirements and institutional policy in regards to assistive technology programs and services.

Ron Stewart is the founding Director of the Northwest Center for Technology Access at Oregon State University. Ron has worked in the field of Educational Technology for over 20 years, and for the last seven years as the Director of the Technology Access Program at Oregon State University. Ron has established at OSU a program focused on access to educational technology for adult learners that has become a national model. His expertise is in the area of computer access and distance education program development, with an emphasis on the implementation of the principals of Universal Design in the Postsecondary Educational environment. Ron consults extensively with postsecondary educational systems on the development of fully accessible technology environments, systemic and institutional culture change, and universally accessible building and program design.


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I) CANCELLED


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Monday, March 15, 2003 ~ 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Room: Scottsdale - Marriott
J) Creative Strategies For Funding Assistive Technology (AT) Devices In A Challenging Economy

This workshop will address the wide variety of funding sources currently available for a range of assistive technologies (AT). Particular attention will be given to national policy changes addressing augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) devices, and the potential impact on other types of AT. Attendees will gain knowledge in: identifying national funding sources for AT; explaining the rationale for a complete funding packet for AT; recognizing and responding to strategies being employed by various funding sources; describing and discussing alternative sources for funding AT; and determining steps necessary to advocate for successful funding.

Patricia Ourand, MS, CCC-SLP holds a Master's degree in Speech Pathology from Loyola College in Baltimore, MD, as well as a Master's degree in Technology for Special Education & Rehabilitation from the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, MD. She is currently the president of Associated Speech & Language Services, Inc., a speech-language pathology practice, serving the Baltimore/Washington area, and specializing in augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). Pat consults with a variety of organizations from across the country, including acting in the capacity of the Funding Coordinator for the Maryland Technology Assistance Program (MD TAP).

Lewis Golinker, BS, MPA, JD, is the Director of the ATLC. His experience includes 21 years service providing direct legal representation and national legal technical assistance regarding assistive device funding. He is the co-author, with M. Morris, of Assistive Technology: A Funding Workbook (RESNA Press 1991), and with S. Mistrett, of "Funding" in J. Angelo, Assistive Technology for Rehabilitation Therapists (F.A.Davis 1996), as well as the author or co-author of numerous monographs, articles, and newsletter columns. For more than a decade, he has been a frequent presenter at conferences sponsored by international, national state and local medical, disability, legal and public policy organizations. In August 2001, he was awarded the Professional Achievement Award by the United States Society for Augmentative and Alternative Communication (USSAAC) for his efforts to persuade the Medicare program to adopt AAC device coverage criteria.


PRECONFERENCE WORKSHOPS OF TUESDAY, MARCH 16, 2004

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Tuesday, March 16, 2003 ~ 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Room: Atlanta/Boston - Marriott
K) Exploring Features And Functionality Of Accommodations For The Visually Impaired

This workshop will provide an overview of currently available technologies for persons with vision impairment. Demonstrations and structured hands-on exploration will allow attendees to understand a wide scope of accommodations. Attendees will gain knowledge in: describing currently available technologies for persons with vision impairment for all age ranges; comparing and contrasting features for accessing information without normal vision; applying features of computer access, electronic travel aids, as well as electronic aides to daily living to accommodations needed by individuals with visual impairment; and identifying technologies and resources for acquisition of low-to-high technology accommodations.

Leah Vickery is employed as an AT trainer by the Center on Disabilities at California State University, Northridge. After graduating from Ball State University, in Muncie, Indiana with a degree in Psychological Science, Counseling and Computer Science, Leah began her own business as an independent consultant while working as the coordinator for the Adaptive Computer Technology Program at Ball State University. In this capacity, Leah developed a comprehensive campus technology program for students, faculty and staff with disabilities.


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Tuesday, March 16, 2003 ~ 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Room: Carmel - Hilton
L) Assistive Technology And Autism

This workshop will explore the use of assistive technology, including augmentative communication, that has increased the functioning level of students diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. A review of the literature and examples from actual student video files will add to the information attendees will receive regarding the use of assistive technology in program planning for students with autism. Attendees will gain knowledge in: identifying different types of assistive technology that would enhance programming in three specific domain areas for students diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder; comparing and contrasting features of common treatment philosophies and/or methodologies using current literature and research materials; describing different types of intervention strategies that involve teaching communicative alternatives to challenging behaviors; and creating an example activity planner showing the use of assistive technology in the daily routine of a hypothetical individual with autism.

Susan R. McCloskey, MS, CCC-SLP/L, is currently a program specialist and department chairperson of the county-wide assistive technology team for the Volusia County School District in Florida. After fifteen years of consulting in the statewide educational support network in Pennsylvania as an assistive technology consultant, Susan relocated to Florida in the spring of 2003. In her new position, Susan supports assistive technology needs of students in a diverse, suburban school district with a student population of 67,000. Susan has trained teams nationwide on the implementation of strategies known as Environmental Communication Teaching (ECT). She holds the Certificate of Communication Competence from the American Speech Language Hearing Association (ASHA), and recently completed a certificate program in Applied Behavior Analysis for Special Education from the Pennsylvania State University. She is an elected member of the national steering committee for the Division of Augmentative and Alternative Communication of ASHA, and a member of USSAAC and ISAAC.


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Tuesday, March 16, 2003 ~ 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Room: Chicago/Dallas - Marriott
M) Achieving Web Accessibility With Section 508

This hands-on workshop on accessibility of the World Wide Web will provide a detailed overview of the Section 508 Web Accessibility Standards and also the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines from the W3C. Attendees will gain a working definition of accessibility, learning specific techniques for accessible design, plus tools and techniques for evaluating accessibility. Attendees will gain knowledge in: stating the working definition of accessibility and explaining the purpose of accessible design; identifying the 16 Section 508 requirements for Internet and Intranet Accessibility; recognizing accessibility barriers confronting people with disabilities when they use the Web; applying specific techniques for accessible design; and using automated tools as part of accessibility evaluation.

Jim Thatcher, PhD, received one of the first PhDs in Computer Science. His research was in the area of mathematical computer science. Dr. Thatcher developed one of the first screen readers for DOS which became IBM Screen Reader (and the phrase became generic). He led the development of IBM Screen Reader/2 for OS/2 which was the first screen reader for the graphical user interface on the PC. He led the effort to establish the IBM accessibility guidelines specifically for use by IBM's development community. Dr. Thatcher wrote the course on Web Accessibility for Section 508 for ITTATC, the Information Technology Technical Assistance and Training Center, which was funded to support Section 508.

John Slatin, PhD, is the founding Director of the Institute for Technology and Learning at the University of Texas at Austin. Dr. Slatin, who is visually impaired, has been involved with accessibility issues since 1985, when he received a grant to develop software for visually impaired students in the University's first computer-based writing class. He is Vice President of the Board of Directors of VSA Arts of Texas, a statewide organization that works with groups throughout Texas and the United States to make cultural events and facilities accessible to people with disabilities.

Jim Allan, PhD, has worked in the field of assistive technology and accessible information access for over 24 years. Dr. Allan is a Working Group Participant of the World Wide Web Consortium-Web Accessibility Initiatives (W3C-WAI). He has been a participant in the Authoring Tools and Education and Outreach working groups. Dr. Allan chaired the Texas Education Agency Computer Network Study Project-Accessibility Subcommittee. This committee produced a comprehensive guide for accessible multimedia and web-based textbook design and delivery.


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Tuesday, March 16, 2003 ~ 9:00 AM- 4:30 PM
Room: Denver - Marriott
N) Mac OS X Accessibility And Universal Learning

This hands-on workshop will provide attendees with an understanding of Apple's Mac OS X Accessibility features and Universal Learning. Attendees will gain knowledge in: identifying accessibility features included in Mac OS X and determining when these will be useful; becoming capable of developing accessible learning programs with technology; learning to demonstrate how TextEdit, iCal, Calculator and iChat AV can be incorporated into learning programs for students with disabilities; identifying programs in Mac OS X that provide support and solutions for students with disabilities; and identifying and describing how to make an accessibly application on Mac OS X.

Javier Perez-Sanchez is a Manager for Higher Education Marketing charged with creating programs and solutions for higher education enterprise and IT as well as managing several education standards such as IMS, OKI, Internet2 and Accessibility. He has been with Apple for 4 years.

Mary Beth Janes is the Assistive Technology Partnership Manager for Worldwide Developer Relations. She has been with Apple for 4 years. Previously, she operated an assistive technology center at Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana.


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Tuesday, March 16, 2003 ~ 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Room: La Jolla A - Hilton
O) Overview Of Augmentative And Alternative Communication Systems

This workshop presentation will provide an overview of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems, including no tech strategies, low tech aids and high tech devices and how all three can be used by children and adults with severe communication impairment. This workshop is designed for persons new to the field of AAC and will include resources for continuing education in the field and at the "Technology for Persons with Disabilities" Conference. Attendees will gain knowledge in: identifying disorders that can lead to the need for AAC and how these conditions can affect cognitive, physical, sensory and linguistic abilities; describing no tech communication strategies that can be used by individuals with severe communication impairment; explaining key features of high tech communication devices; determining when a no tech, low tech or high tech system is most effective in a given situation for a particular individual; and becoming familiar with resources for continuing the delivery of service and training.

Iris Fishman, MA, CCC-SLP, an augmentative communication and assistive technology specialist with over twenty years of experience, is currently in private practice in the New York metropolitan area where she is involved with numerous regional and national projects. Ms. Fishman is also the Executive Director of CINI (Communication Independence for the Neurologically Impaired). Prior to entering private practice, she was the Director of National Assistive Technology Projects at the National Center for Disability Services in Albertson, NY, where she conceived and developed a unique program of over 20 web casts in augmentative communication. In January of 2004, Ms. Fishman will become President of the United States Society for Augmentative and Alternative Communication (USSAAC).


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Tuesday, March 16, 2003 ~ 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Room: La Jolla B - Hilton
P) Making Learning Active: Simple Adaptations For Young Children And Children Functioning At Young Levels

This workshop will focus on creative and simple ideas for adapting learning materials using assistive technology such as Velcro, hot glue, carpet scraps, battery-operated toys, and computers. Part of the day will include a "make and take" component where attendees will construct adapted materials to use with children. Attendees will gain knowledge in: determining which children can benefit from simple assistive technology and why; describing how to make learning more active by utilizing three inborn motivational drives; explaining how simple toys and objects from around the house may be adapted to reach IFSP and IEP goals and objectives; learning how to adapt toys and educational materials with assistive technology such as: Velcro, hot glue, carpet scraps, battery-operated toys, and computers; understanding key features of software programs and adaptations that encourage active learning; and constructing adapted teaching materials that may be used directly with students.

Linda Burkhart is a nationally known pioneer in the field of simplified technology for children with severe disabilities. She has developed numerous adapted switches and innovative applications for using these devices with children. She is the author of four books, including two on homemade battery devices, one on using speech synthesis to facilitate communicative interaction, and one on Total Augmentative Communication in the Early Childhood Classroom. Linda was a classroom teacher in Prince George's County, Maryland for fifteen years. Linda also worked for eight years as an Augmentative Communication and Assistive Technology Specialist for the Center for Technology in Education - a joint project between the Johns Hopkins University and the Maryland State Department of Education. The position involved statewide direct service training and assistance. Currently, Linda works as a private consultant and technology integration specialist.


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Tuesday, March 16, 2003 ~ 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Room: Los Angeles - Hilton
Q) U.S. Federal Government Initiatives: Using Technology To Increase Employment Of People With Disabilities

This workshop will focus on the current and future work of the U.S. federal government to increase employment of people with disabilities in the federal ranks. A complete overview of how the federal employment lifecycle will be provided - recruiting, hiring, placing, accommodating, training, and retaining - is impacted by the nature, quality and availability of assistive technology plans and strategies. Attendees will gain knowledge in: identifying and describing federal laws, policies and initiatives; identifying recruitment and hiring processes and initiatives; understanding the accommodations centralized process; understanding retention policies and practices; and supporting resources to improve employment lifecycles. In addition, attendees will learn about new AT Centers, technology transfer trends, employment trends, gaining management commitment and the creation of individual strategic plans to increase employment opportunities for people with disabilities.

Dinah F. B. Cohen is the Director for the Department of Defense (DoD) Computer/Electronic Accommodations Program (CAP Ms. Cohen provides the leadership and direction to ensure employees have the appropriate accommodation solutions in their workplace. Ms. Cohen received the "1995 Federal 100" Award, sponsored by Federal Computer Week, for her impact on the development, acquisition and management of information technology in the Federal government and the DoD Exceptional Civilian Service Award for her leadership and management of the CAP program. She became a Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (C.R.C.) in October 1980. She received a Master of Science degree in Counseling Psychology with a concentration in rehabilitation counseling from the State University of New York at Buffalo. She holds a BS in Social Science/Elementary Education from Russell Sage College in Troy, New York.

Derek Shields is a Program Manager for the Accessibility Services Division of Axiom Resource Management, Inc. Mr. Shields provides leadership and management support to the Department of Defense (DoD) Computer/Electronic Accommodations Program (CAP). Mr. Shields earned his Bachelor of Arts at Bucknell University and his Masters of Management and Disability Services at the University of San Francisco. He resides in Annapolis, MD.


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Tuesday, March 16, 2003 ~ 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Room: Pacific A - Hilton
R) Learning Disabilities Through The Life Span: Matching Technology Solutions

This workshop will explore the available technology solutions and their matches to the Neuropyschological framework for assessment of learning disabilities which is shared in Workshop E. Attendees will obtain information which will support the matching of the individual with the features of assistive technology. Using the SETT framework™, attendees will gain knowledge in: identifying student's needs within the environment and tasks which need to be performed to features of technology; identifying technology which is available to assist individuals with dyslexia and dyscalculia, which are major areas of learning disabilities; and technology tools for organization, scheduling, and memory aids.

Scott Marfilius has been working with individuals with disabilities for the past 22 years. The past 16 years has involved implementing assistive technology at various levels. First within an integrated classroom as a classroom teacher, then implementing a district wide system change within a Public School System by assisting their District Wide Team. He continues to assist teams and individuals in assessing students assistive technology needs. His teaching certifications are in Early Childhood Handicap, Cognitive Disabilities, Emotional Disability, and Learning Disability. He also consults with individuals and businesses to determine adaptations that are needed in work place settings. Scott's focus areas in assistive technology include computer access, and technologies that assist those with cognitive and learning disabilities.


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Tuesday, March 16, 2003 ~ 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Room: Pacific B - Hilton
S) The Assistive Technology Assessment Process

This workshop will walk participants through the process of putting together or refining their current assistive technology assessment process. This 10-step process begins at the intake and is completed with the development of an implementation plan and strategies for follow-up. Attendees will gain knowledge in: the 10 steps of the Fundamental Assessment Process; reviewing and independently using/explaining how to use a minimum of one assessment tool in the assistive technology assessment process; comparing and contrasting their current assessment process in reflection of information gained in the session; identifying at least 2 key similarities/differences in order to revise their current assessment processes; and gaining knowledge regarding ways of obtaining assistive technologies for the trial portion of the assessment process.

Kelly S. Fonner, MS, has been working with individuals with disabilities since the mid 70s. She has 19 years of experience in Assistive technology. Her teaching experiences have been as a classroom aide, teacher and instructional media specialist in early childhood, preschool and school age programs, She has consulted to university and adult programs concerning access to computers by persons with disabilities. She has a BS in special education, and an MS in educational technology and is currently working towards her PhD in urban education. Kelly worked as a consultant with PennTech, the state-wide e\technology project supported by the Pennsylvania Department of Education.


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Tuesday, March 16, 2003 ~ 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Room: Scottsdale - Marriott
T) Assistive Technology Use By Persons Who Are Deaf Or Hard Of Hearing

This workshop will provide participants with information about historical and available technologies that provide communications access for persons who are deaf or hard of hearing. The informational areas include personal, phone/wireless, print, and Internet technologies. Attendees will gain knowledge in: identifying and describing communications access technology, personal communications, and other access technologies that can be used in education and workplace settings which are used by deaf and hard of hearing individuals.

Gary R. Sanderson is the Outreach Program Coordinator at the National Center on Deafness (NCOD) at California State University, Northridge (CSUN). Gary has been a lead interpreter and senior interpreter at CSUN where he began his employment in 1978. Gary has lectured extensively on a variety of topics in the field of interpretation, including Deaf Culture and Children of Deaf Adults. Gary is presently the co-chair of the National Association of Deaf-Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf, National Council on Interpreting.

Dr. Cheryl D. Davis is Director, Regional Resource Center on Deafness, Western Oregon University. She is Coordinator of the WROCC Outreach Site at WOU, Western Oregon University, in Monmouth. She has also served as an assistant research professor for teaching research and as a computer support service specialist as well as being a free lance interpreter.

Dr. Merri C. Pearson is the Director of the National Center on Deafness at California State University, Northridge. In this position she leads and manages the organization including student services, finance and technology and special projects units. Dr. Pearson also directs the Western Region Outreach Center and Consortia, providing training, outreach and technical assistance to postsecondary institutions in the Western United States and its Territories. Dr. Pearson has been a Program Officer with the U.S. Department of Education.

James M. Macaluso is the Administrator of Finance and Technology at the National Center on Deafness at California State University, Northridge. In this position he oversees all fiscal and technology affairs, including budget, accounting, and staffing together with all other human resource activities. James has also served as the Information Technology Coordinator for NCOD, providing consultative support to administrators, staff, faculty, deaf and hard of hearing students.

Copyright © 2004 CSUN, Center On Disabilities