2004 Conference Proceedings

Go to previous article 
Go to next article 
Return to 2004 Table of Contents 


COMPUTER-BASED AT ASSESSMENT WITH PERSONS WITH LOW VISION

Presenters
Harris Rosensweig
Adaptive Technology Projects Manager
Royal New Zealand Foundation of the Blind
Awhina House, 4 Maunsell Road,
Parnell, Auckland, 1031, New Zealand
Phone +64 9 355-6904
Fax +64 9 355-6919
Email: hrosensweig@rnzfb.org.nz 
Website: http://www.rnzfb.org.nz

Thomas Bryan
Adaptive Communications Technologist
Royal New Zealand Foundation of the Blind
121 Adelaide Road,
Newtown, Wellington, New Zealand
Phone +64 4 380-2140
Fax +64 4 389-5254
Email: tbryan@rnzfb.org.nz 
Website: http://www.rnzfb.org.nz

Computer-based adaptive technology (AT) assessments with persons with low vision are challenging for the AT professional given the wide range of variables that must be considered during the assessment. Some of these variables include:

Based on the number of variables involved, a one-size fits all approach does not work with AT assessments and flexibility on the part of the AT professional is essential. The authors have found that the AT professionals that perform the best AT assessments exhibit the following traits:

Even when all of the above are performed well, the often time-limited nature of AT assessments can produce false results. For example, a person that has a large print program recommended for them who several months later realise that a screen reader is more appropriate.

Few tools exist to assist the AT professional in navigating the complexities of these assessments. This 60-minute presentation will provide the audience with practical information on how to approach these types of assessments via a methodology the presenters helped develop at SAF in Sunnyvale, California and at the Royal New Zealand Foundation of the Blind (RNZFB) in Auckland and Wellington, New Zealand. Both organisations have been performing computer-based AT assessments with persons with low vision and the blind since the inception of AT for computers. This methodology will be demonstrated using a computer equipped with AT and through role-playing and discussion with the audience. The audience will be encouraged to share their own experiences with these assessments, so that a global perspective on AT assessment can be obtained. A variety of accessible handouts will be made available to the audience providing detailed tools and guidelines that have been developed at RNZFB and SAF around AT assessment.


Go to previous article 
Go to next article 
Return to 2004 Table of Contents 
Return to Table of Proceedings


Reprinted with author(s) permission. Author(s) retain copyright.