2003 Conference Proceedings

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THE SETT FRAMEWORK AND ATI TOOLS

Presenter
Laura P. Casson, M.S. Sp. Ed.
Assistive Technology, Inc.
7 Wells Avenue
Newton, MA 02459
(800) 793-9227 tel
(281) 772-0967 cell
(617) 641-9191 fax
Email: Lcasson@assistivetech.com

Assistive Technology, Inc. (ATI) manufactures a variety of tools that can help students with disabilities and the professionals who serve them. These include the Gemini & Mercury AAC devices/fully-accessible computers, Link talking keyboard, Stages Alternative Assessment software, and EvaluWare AT Assessment software. But, these tools are only effective if they have first been properly matched to student needs!

In our session, we will focus on a variety of students across the country who were successfully matched with ATI tools to accomplish many different tasks in the school environment! These students have been, and continue to be, successful because the professionals who serve them, whether they knew it or not, followed the SETT framework. SETT can best be described by the author, Joy Smiley Zabala:

To make effective assistive technology decisions, information about the Student, Environment, Tasks, and Tools must be gathered and thoughtfully considered, revised, and acted upon by a multidisciplinary team with full participation from the person and his/her personal and professional supporters. To support this belief, the SETT Framework has been developed. The SETT Framework considers, first, the Student, the Environment(s) and the Tasks required for active participation in the activities of the environment, and, finally, the system of Tools needed for the student to address the tasks.

Excerpt from: The SETT Framework: Critical Areas to Consider When Making Informed Assistive Technology Decisions.

We will explore different students from across the country, the environments in which they were expected to perform, the tasks they needed to accomplish, and the tools that helped them achieve success. For each case, the following items will be considered:

Student

Environment

Tasks

Tools

The following cases will be discussed:

Case #1

A young man in high school who has CP and uses the Mercury AAC device and fully accessible Windows XP computer to speak and write school reports. He also uses the Madentec Tracker to access his device through head movement, and a variety of software programs, including Speaking Dynamically Pro, Co:Writer, and Microsoft Word to create and print out schoolwork work.

Case #2

A grade school girl with mild CP who uses the Gemini AAC device and fully accessible Macintosh computer. This tool helps her to speak, do schoolwork work, and play CDs for recreation. She accesses the device through the built-in touchscreen and uses Speaking Dynamically Pro for speech and schoolwork, and the Apple Audio CD Player for fun!

Case #3

A grade school boy with autism who uses the Link AAC talking keyboard. This tool helps him to speak and type schoolwork for print out. He also uses the telephone feature at home to make phone calls to his grandmother, and speak by typing on the keyboard.

Case #4

A junior high school girl with developmental delays who uses the Stages program for learning at her developmental level. This tool helps her to answer questions about and learn Dolch sight words (a Stage 5 skill). She also uses word cards and daily activities to reinforce the Stage 5 skill she is working on.

Case #5

A grade school boy with developmental delays who uses the Stages program for learning at his developmental level. This tool helps him to answer questions about and learn colors (a Stage 4 skill). He also uses a color chart, daily circle time activities, and games to reinforce the Stage 4 skill he is working on.

References:

Joy Smiley Zabala, M.Ed. (year) The SETT Framework: Critical Areas to Consider When Making Informed Assistive Technology Decisions

Calculator, S. & Jorgenson, C. M. (1991). Integrating AAC instruction into regular education settings: Expounding on best practices. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 7, 204-214.

Karlan, George. Environmental Communication Teaching Training. Field-Initiated Research Grant Award No. H023C9005 from the Office of Special Education, U.S. Department of Education. Lafayette, Indiana: Purdue University

National Council on Disability. Study on the Financing of Assistive Technology Devices and Services for Individuals with Disabilities. A Report to the President and Congress of the United States. Washington, D.C. 1993.


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