2003 Conference Proceedings

Go to previous article 
Go to next article 
Return to 2003 Table of Contents 


A TRAIN-THE-TRAINER MODEL: HELPING TOOLS FOR ACCESS TO INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY IN EDUCATION.

Presenter
Carol Kann, Ed.D.
Temple University - Institute on Disabilities
Ritter Annex Rm 423
Philadelphia, PA 19122
Phone: 215 204-5966
Email: ckann@temple.edu

Schools, from preschool through higher education, including vocational training, use information technology to provide instruction, enhance learning, and enhance communication through the use and development of web pages and online learning resources. Because information technology has become a required tool for academic achievements and participation in activities, ALL students, including students with disabilities, need to be able to access this technology. Although Assistive Technology can assist a person with a disability to access computers, applications, and the Internet, Assistive Technology alone does not make information technology (content) accessible.

The Federal government has issued Section 508 regulations, which provide minimum standards for accessibility. Educational entities are encouraged to utilized Section 508 regulations, and principles of universal design.

The Mid-Atlantic Accessible Education-Based Information Technology Consortium is comprised of state programs funded under the Assistive Technology Act of 1998. The Consortium members provide training, information, and technical assistance to promote access to electronic and information technology by people with disabilities in educational settings within the Mid-Atlantic Region (including PA, DE, MD, VA, WV, and DC). The audience includes higher education faculty, educators, policy makers, librarians, technical support staff and others who work or participate in education settings, students with disabilities and their families, advocates, and employees with disabilities.

The Mid-Atlantic Accessible Education-Based Information Technology Consortium is coordinated by the Institute on Disabilities at Temple University, administered by TransCen as part of the Mid-Atlantic ADA Information Center and funded by the National Institute on Disability Rehabilitation and Research of the U.S. Department of Education.

Pennsylvania's Initiative in Assistive Technology (PIAT), developed a full-day Train-the-Trainer Model titled, "Helping Tools for Access to Information Technology in Education," in order to exponentially increase awareness in education settings on procurement of accessible information technology and delivery of accessible information. Extensive planning and preparation went into this Model. A complete training kit was prepared for each participant to borrow after completion of the course to conduct at least five trainings of two to three hour sessions.

At the session to be held at CSUN, the speaker will share her experiences, from start to finish, in the development of the Train-the-Trainer Model so that others will be able to replicate the Model. She will speak about why this model was chosen, criteria for the included resources, the process for development and delivery, criteria for participation, finding participants, and the outcome strategies. She will display the Helping Tools for Access to Information Technology in Education Kit and explain the logic for including each item in the kit. The kit is composed of Assistive Technology devices, a PowerPoint presentation, speaker notes, a video, a resource manual containing reference materials, hand-outs, training tips, and Web resources.

In addition, the speaker will explain how each piece of Assistive Technology included in the Kit helps to demonstrate to participants the difficulties that people with disabilities might experience when using electronic and information technology such as a self contained devices, telecommunication product, or accessing a computer and then the content on a website.

The topic for this session is relevant to people who are responsible for spreading awareness and teaching skills related to accessible information technology, such as working on Accessible Information Technology projects under DBTAC, higher education administration and faculty, educators, policy makers, librarians, technical support staff and others who work or participate in education settings.


Go to previous article 
Go to next article 
Return to 2003 Table of Contents 
Return to Table of Proceedings


Reprinted with author(s) permission. Author(s) retain copyright.