Dept. of Chemistry & Biochemistry

18111 Nordhoff Street
Northridge, California 91330-8241

Phone: (818) 677-1200
Fax: (818) 677-4068M
E-mail: chemistry@csun.edu

Hours:
Mon-Fri: 8:00am-5:00pm

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS


LOWER DIVISION


CHEM 100. PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY (3)

Prerequisite: A qualifying score on the ELM Examination or satisfying the ELM exemption requirements. A one-semester course based on a systematic, semiempirical approach to the submicroscopic world of chemistry. The development of modern ideas concerning atomic and molecular structure, principles of compound formation, and chemical reactivity will be emphasized. Selected topics in applied chemistry and the application of chemical principles to life and environmental sciences will be explored. Engineering and Science majors should consult with their advisors before enrolling in this course. Credit cannot be earned in both CHEM 103 and 100. 3 hours of lecture per week. Students using this course to satisfy a General Education requirement in Natural Sciences may satisfy the corresponding laboratory requirement by completing CHEM 100L.



CHEM 100L. PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY LABORATORY(1)

Prerequisite: A qualifying score on the ELM Examination or satisfying the ELM exemption requirements. Corequisite: CHEM 100. Optional laboratory course to accompany CHEM 100 in which the fundamentals of scientific inquiry and basic laboratory techniques are presented. May be used to satisfy the laboratory requirement in Natural Sciences of General Education provided CHEM 100 is also completed. Three-hour laboratory.



CHEM 101/L. GENERAL CHEMISTRY I and LAB (4/1)

Prerequisite: a satisfactory score on the Chemistry Placement Test (CPT) or a grade of C or higher (C- is unacceptable) in CHEM 100 taken at CSUN only. Corequisite: CHEM 101L. Basic course in the fundamental principles and theories with special emphasis on chemical calculations. Includes a discussion of the kinetic molecular theory, atomic structures, and the periodic table, solutions, and oxidation-reduction. Recitation portion deals with problem solving, review of the lecture material and quizzes. Lab: Emphasizes basic lab skills, quantitative relationships in chemistry, and inorganic preparative procedures. Completion of CHEM 101/L satisfies General Education Natural Sciences including the corresponding lab requirement. Three hours lecture; 1 hour recitation per week; one three-hour lab per week.



CHEM 102/L. GENERAL CHEMISTRY II and LAB(4/1)

Prerequisite: CHEM 101/L with a minimum grade of C- in CHEM 101. Corequisite: CHEM 102L. Continuation of CHEM 101. Introduction to kinetics, gas phase and solution equilibria, electrochemistry, chemical thermodynamics, radio, organic chemistry and the descriptive chemistry of the more familiar metals and nonmetals. Recitation portion deals with problem solving, review of the lecture material and quizzes. Lab: Consists of experiments dealing with kinetics, acid-base and solubility equilibria, selected reactions of metals and nonmetals, and qualitative elemental analysis. Completion of CHEM 102/L satisfies General Education, Natural Sciences including the corresponding lab requirement. Three hours lecture; one hour recitation per week; one three-hour lab per week.



CHEM 103/L. INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY I and LAB (3/1)

Prerequisite: Qualifying score on the ELM Examination or satisfying the ELM exemption requirements. Corequisite: CHEM 103L. Not open to engineering, biology or physical science majors. Designed to stress fundamental principles of inorganic chemistry, the structure of atoms and molecules, the periodic table, states of matter, chemical calculations involving stoichiometry and simple algebraic operations. Credit cannot be earned in both CHEM 103 and 100. Students using this course to satisfy a General Education Requirement in the Natural Sciences satisfy the laboratory requirement. Three hours lecture and one 3-hour laboratory per week.



CHEM 104/L. INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY II and LAB (3/1)

Prerequisite: CHEM 103/L. Corequisite: CHEM 104L. Not open to engineering, biology or physical science majors. Continuation of CHEM 103/L. Properties of solutions, chemical equilibrium, acids and bases. Chemistry of simple organic compounds and common elements. Students using this course to satisfy a General Education requirement in Natural Sciences satisfy the laboratory requirement. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory per week.



CHEM 110. CHEMISTRY IN ACTION (3)

A one-semester course introducing chemistry and its relation to technological advances and their impact on our society and the environment. 3 hours of lecture per week. Students using this course to satisfy a General Education requirement in Natural Sciences may satisfy the corresponding laboratory requirement by completing CHEM 110L. Three hours of lecture per week.



CHEM 110L. CHEMISTRY IN ACTION LABORATORY (1)

Recommended Corequisite or Preparatory: CHEM 110 or 100. No credit for Science and Engineering majors. Lab-demonstration course that accompanies CHEM 110. Lab experiments and demonstrations to augment lecture material are performed. Introduction to some basic lab skills. May be used to satisfy the lab requirement in Natural Sciences of General Education provided CHEM 100 or 110 is also completed. One three-hour lab session per week.



CHEM 235/L. INTRODUCTORY ORGANIC CHEMISTRY and LAB (3/1)

Prerequisite: CHEM 102/L or CHEM 104/L. Corequisite: CHEM 235L. A course describing simple aliphatic and aromatic compounds with an emphasis on the chemistry of functional groups. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour of laboratory per week. No credit for Science and Engineering majors except for certain options in Biology and Geology; consult your major department. This course does not substitute for CHEM 333.



UPPER DIVISION


CHEM 321/L. CHEMICAL ANALYSIS I and LAB (2/2)

Prerequisite: CHEM 102/L. Corequisite: CHEM 321L. Emphasizes the principles of analytical reactions and the theory and applications of instruments to problems of chemical analysis. Principal topics include volumetric methods and instrumental techniques such as spectrophotometry, electro chemistry, and chromatography. Lab: Introduction to the experimental methods of analytical chemistry based on the theory covered in CHEM 321. Emphasis on the development of careful and accurate lab technique. Two hours lecture per week; two three-hour lab periods per week.



CHEM 333/L. PRINCIPLES OF ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I and LAB (3/1)

Prerequisite: CHEM 102/L. Corequisite: CHEM 333L (all majors), CHEM 333R for Chemistry and Biochemistry majors. Recommended Corequisite: CHEM 333R for all other majors. The study of the structure and properties of organic molecules, with a special emphasis on functional groups and their reactions. Attention given to the mechanisms of organic reactions and the spectroscopic techniques used to determine the structure of organic molecules. Lab: An introduction to the techniques of synthesis, purification and characterization of organic compounds. Three hours lecture per week; one three-hour lab per week.



CHEM 333R. PROBLEM SOLVING IN ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I (1)

Corequisite: CHEM 333. Critical analysis of topics introduced in CHEM 333. Structured group work is used to develop essential analysis and problem-solving skills. One hour per week.



CHEM 334/L. PRINCIPLES OF ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II and LAB (3/1)

Prerequisite: CHEM 333/L. Corequisite: CHEM 334L (all majors), CHEM 334R for Chemistry and Biochemistry majors. Recommended Corequisite: CHEM 334R for all other majors. Continuation of CHEM 333, with an emphasis on mechanisms of organic reactions and synthesis. Attention given to representative compounds of interest in biology and medicine. Lab: Exposure to reactions common in chemical synthesis, including arene substitution, transformations of carbonyl compounds, the Diels-Alder reaction and polymer synthesis. Three hours lecture per week; one three-hour lab per week.



CHEM 334R. PROBLEM SOLVING IN ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II (1)

Corequisite: CHEM 334. Recommended Preparatory: CHEM 333R. Critical analysis of topics introduced in CHEM 334. Structured group work is used to develop essential analysis and problem-solving skills. One hour per week.



CHEM 351. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I (4)

Prerequisites: CHEM 102/L; PHYS 220A or 225; MATH 150B or 255B. Recommended Corequisite or Preparatory: CHEM 351L and MATH 250. Basic laws of thermodynamics, states and changes of state, solutions, equilibria, phase rule, kinetic molecular theory, chemical kinetics, and electrochemistry. Four lecture hours per week. (Offered fall semester)



CHEM 351L. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I LAB (1)

Corequisite: CHEM 351. Laboratory course for CHEM 351. Introduction to the experimental methods of hysical chemistry based on the concepts covered in CHEM 351. One three-hour lab per week. (Offered fall semester)



CHEM 352. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II (4)

Prerequisite: CHEM 321/L, 351; PHYS 220B or 226; Recommended Corequisite or Preparatory: CHEM 351L and MATH 280. Continuation of CHEM 351. Quantum mechanics, atomic and molecular structure, spectroscopy, statistical mechanics, and new developments in physical chemistry. (Offered spring semester)



CHEM 352L. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II LABORATORY (1)

Corequisite: CHEM 352. Laboratory course for CHEM 352. Selected experiments illustrating some of the important concepts covered in CHEM 352. One three-hour laboratory per week (Offered spring semester).



CHEM 365/L. INTRODUCTION TO BIOCHEMISTRY and LAB (3/1)

Prerequisite: CHEM 235/L or CHEM 333/L. Corequisite: CHEM 365L. A course designed for non-science majors, describing chemistry and metabolism of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, vitamins, hormones, etc. Three hours of lecture and one 3-hour laboratory per week. No credit for Science or Engineering majors except for certain options in Biology; consult your major department.



CHEM 401. INORGANIC CHEMISTRY (3)

Prerequisite: CHEM 351. Principles of chemical bonding and molecular structure; survey of the chemistry of the elements of the periodic system. Three hours of lecture per week.



CHEM 401L. INORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY (1)

Corequisite: CHEM 401. Synthesis and characterization of inorganic and organometallic compounds. Synthetic techniques important to inorganic chemistry such as electrochemical synthesis, autoclave reactions, inert atmosphere techniques as well as inorganic spectroscopic techniques. One three-hour lab per week.



CHEM 411. SYNTHESIS (3)

Prerequisite: CHEM 334/L. Preparation of inorganic and organic compounds and their identification, using advanced methods. One hour lecture and two three-hour lab periods per week. (Offered fall semester)



CHEM 422/L. CHEMICAL ANALYSIS II and LAB (2/2)

Prerequisite: CHEM 321/L. Corequisite: CHEM 422L. Continuation of CHEM 321 with special emphasis on polarography and voltammetry, chromatography, spectrophotometric methods, mass spectrometry and radiochemical methods. Two hours of lecture per week and two three-hour lab periods per week.



CHEM 433. ORGANIC ANALYSIS (3)

Prerequisite: CHEM 334/L. Identification of organic compounds using advanced spectrometric techniques that include modern NMR methods. One hour lecture and two three-hour lab periods per week. (Offered spring semester)



CHEM 451. MODERN PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY (3)

Prerequisite: CHEM 352. Selected topics in modern physical chemistry, including atomic and molecular structure and spectra, the chemical bond, inter-molecular forces, interaction of matter with fields and the solid state. Three hours lecture per week.



CHEM 461/L. BIOCHEMISTRY I and LAB (3/1)

Prerequisites: CHEM 321/L and 334/L. Corequisite: CHEM 461L. The first part of a two-semester biochemistry lecture series designed for biochemistry majors that includes study of protein structure and function, enzyme mechanisms, biological membranes, carbohydrate metabolism, ATP generation and lipid metabolism. Lab includes experiments involving acid/base chemistry, peptide analysis, spectrophotometric analysis, protein isolation and characterization, enzyme kinetics. Three hours of lecture per week and one three-hour lab per week. (Offered fall semester)



CHEM 462/L. BIOCHEMISTRY II and LAB (3/1)

Prerequisite: CHEM 461/L or instructor consent. Corequisite: CHEM 462L. Continuation of CHEM 461, the second part of a two-semester biochemistry lecture series designed for biochemistry majors, including discussion of photosynthesis, amino acid metabolism, lipoproteins, metabolic interrelationships and regulation, information transfer, and signal transduction. Lab includes experiments involving gel filtration, ATP biosynthesis, isolation and characterization of phospholipids, reactions of lipolytic enzymes, mitochondrial dehydrogenases, isolation of DNA, study of restriction enzymes, and polymerase chain reaction. Three hours of lecture per week and one three-hour lab per week. (Offered spring semester)



CHEM 464. PRINCIPLES OF BIOCHEMISTRY (3)

Prerequisite: CHEM 334/L. Corequisite (for Chemistry majors and minors): CHEM 464L. Properties and metabolism of the constituents of biological systems. Mechanism of enzyme action, energy relations in biological systems. Three hours of lecture per week. Available for graduate credit.



CHEM 464L. PRINCIPLES OF BIOCHEMISTRY LABORATORY (1)

Prerequisite: CHEM 334/L. Corequisite: CHEM 464. Recommended Preparatory: CHEM 321/L. Experiments involving acid/base chemistry, peptide structure, spectrophotometric analysis, biomolecule purification and enzymology designed to develop the ability to collect, analyze and report experimental biochemical information. One three-hour lab per week. Available for graduate credit.



CHEM 465. TOPICS IN BIOCHEMISTRY (3)

Prerequisite: CHEM 462 or instructor consent. Seminar in major recent developments in biochemistry. Three hours of lecture or discussion per week. (Offered spring semester)



CHEM 471. CHEMICAL LITERATURE, INFORMATION RETRIEVAL & PRESENTATION (1)

Prerequisite: Open only to junior and senior Science majors and graduate students in Science. Use of the chemical literature including abstracts and computer retrieval systems. Preparation of manuscripts and oral presentations. One hour of lecture per week.



CHEM 481. NUCLEAR AND RADIOCHEMISTRY (4)

Prerequisite: CHEM 352. Study of the atomic nucleus and its properties. Description of nuclear phenomena and an introduction to nuclear theory. Lab: Techniques for the study of radio-nuclides and the application of isotopic tracers to problems in biology, chemistry, geology, and physics are explored. Two hours lecture and two three-hour lab periods per week.



CHEM 495A-C. DIRECTED UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (1-3)

Prerequisite: One course beyond CHEM 102 in the area related to the research. Interested students should make arrangements with the department as soon as possible, preferably during the previous semester. For students of advanced rank and proven competence in chemistry. Program of original independent research, culminating in a written report, carried out under the direction of one of the Chemistry faculty. Upon prior approval by the Department of a detailed research proposal, the research may be performed in industrial or medical labs. In such a case, the research report must be submitted to and evaluated by a designated member of the Chemistry faculty. May be repeated for credit. No credit towards M.S. degree.



CHEM 499A-C. INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-3)

See independent study under courses of study.



GRADUATE

Graduate students should refer to Graduate Programs. In general, only two graduate courses in Chemistry or Biochemistry are offered per semester. Students are encouraged to ask the departmental office or graduate advisor which courses will be offered in upcoming semesters.

CHEM 500. CHEMISTRY TEACHING ASSISTANT WORKSHOP (1)

Prerequisite: Graduate student status. An instructional improvement workshop for graduate teaching assistants. Participants learn by presenting short video-taped lessons to the class and by receiving feedback on the basic skills demonstrated in the lesson. Participants are presented with a basic model for clear chemistry lab teaching and are taught effective feedback techniques. (Credit/No Credit Only, offered fall semester)



CHEM 502. ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY (3)

Prerequisite: CHEM 401. A study of molecular structure of inorganic compounds; coordination chemistry; kinetics and mechanisms of inorganic reactions. Three hours of lecture per week.



CHEM 522. ADVANCED ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY (3)

Prerequisite: CHEM 422/L or approval of the instructor. An advanced-level discussion of topics in analytical chemistry with particular emphasis on separation sciences and optical spectroscopy. Topics that will be discussed in detail are fluorescence, phosphorescence, phase and distribution equilibria, extraction techniques, electrophoresis and micro-fluid separation. Three hours lecture per week.



CHEM 531. SURVEY OF ORGANIC REACTIONS (3)

Prerequisite: CHEM 334/L. A detailed survey of the ranges of application and mechanisms of organic oxidations, reductions, additions, eliminations, condensations and degradations with specific reference to their applications to problems of synthesis and structure elucidation. Three hours of lecture per week.



CHEM 534. ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY (3)

Prerequisites: CHEM 334/L and 352. Physical and physiochemical consideration of organic chemistry. Kinetics, configuration. Three hours of lecture per week.



CHEM 538. NATURAL PRODUCTS (3)

Prerequisite: CHEM 334/L. The chemistry and biosynthesis of naturally-occurring compounds including alkaloids, steroids, terpenes, and mold metabolites, based on structure elucidation, synthesis, biosynthetic considerations, and physiological properties. Use of modern methods for structure determination and application of unique structural features in theoretical chemistry. Three hours of lecture per week.



CHEM 541. ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY I (2)

Prerequisite: CHEM 422/L or approval of the instructor. Recommended corequisite: CHEM 541L. A comprehensive survey of the earth's natural processes in atmosphere, water and soil, and the chemical aspects of the impact that human activities have produced in the natural environment. In addition, topics such as energy resources, hazardous waste management/treatment, and risk assessment will be discussed. Two hours of lecture per week.



CHEM 541L. ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY I LABORATORY (2)

Prerequisite: CHEM 422/L or approval of the instructor. Recommended corequisite: CHEM 541. Application of chemical and instrumental methods for the identification and quantification of inorganic and organic contaminants present in water, soil, and air samples using E.P.A. approved methodologies and protocols. Two three-hour lab periods per week.



CHEM 542. ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY II (1)

Prerequisite: CHEM 541/L or approval of the instructor. Recommended Corequisite: CHEM 542L. An advanced-level discussion of topics in air, water and soil pollution. It includes the role of humic substances in natural waters, stratospheric ozone depletion, acid rain, photochemical smog, soil and treatment technologies. Case studies on soil and water pollution will also be discussed. One hour of lecture per week.



CHEM 542L. ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY II LABORATORY (2)

Prerequisite: CHEM 541/L or approval of instructor. Recommended corequisite: CHEM 542. An advanced level experimental investigation on the identification and analysis of contaminated water, air, and soil samples will be carried out. Experiments using latest treatment technologies will be conducted to understand the application of chemical and biochemical concepts toward solving environmental problems. In addition, experiments to characterize complex environmental systems will be undertaken. Two three-hour lab periods per week.



CHEM 551. CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS (3)

Prerequisite: CHEM 352. Thermodynamic properties of pure systems, mixtures, electrochemical systems, surface phases and systems under the influence of external fields; equilibria and thermodynamics of chemical reactions. Three hours of lecture per week.



CHEM 552. QUANTUM CHEMISTRY (3)

Prerequisite: CHEM 352. The elements of wave mechanics and the application to chemical problems. Three hours of lecture per week.



CHEM 553. CHEMICAL KINETICS (3)

Prerequisite: CHEM 352. A critical consideration of the kinetics of reactions in gaseous and condensed phases, experimental methods, treatment of data, catalysis and chain reactions. Recent developments in the theory of reaction rates. Three hours of lecture per week.



CHEM 554. MACROMOLECULES (3)

Prerequisite: CHEM 352. Physical chemistry of high molecular weight compounds, ultracentrifuge, electrophoresis, light scattering. Three hours of lecture per week.



CHEM 564. BIO-ORGANIC CHEMISTRY(3)

Prerequisite: CHEM 334, CHEM 464 or approval of advisor and instructor. Application of physical organic methods to solution of structural and mechanistic problems in biochemistry. Three hours of lecture per week.



CHEM 565. RECEPTOR BIOCHEMISTRY(3)

Prerequisite: CHEM 464 or CHEM 461. Study of the kinetics, structural requirements and signal-transduction mechanisms of receptor-ligand interactions. Three hours of lecture per week.



CHEM 566. DNA-PROTEIN INTERACTIONS (3)

Prerequisites: CHEM 464 or CHEM 461 and 462. An advanced biochemistry course with an in-depth study of the biochemistry of DNA-Protein interactions. The course focuses on subfields of biochemistry that involve direct physical interaction between DNA and proteins, including DNA repair, mutagenesis, replication, transcription, translation, RNA interference, DNA packaging and chromosomal maintenance. Three hours of lecture per week.



CHEM 595A-Z. EXPERIMENTAL TOPICS COURSES (1-3)

Prerequisite: Consent of advisor and instructor. Specialized topics from a concentrated field of current interest presented at an advanced level. Since the topic chosen is different each semester, students may repeat this course with approval.



CHEM 599A-C. INDEPENDENT STUDY (1-3)



CHEM 691. LITERATURE SEMINAR (1)

Prerequisites: Classified standing and instructor consent. Oral presentation to the department by graduate students on important topics from the current literature in chemistry.



CHEM 692. THESIS SEMINAR (1)

Prerequisites: Classified standing and instructor consent. Oral presentation to the department on results of the graduate student's thesis research. Before presenting the report, a student must submit a rough draft of the MS thesis to the graduate student's thesis committee and to the Department of Chemistry as a whole.



CHEM 696A-C. DIRECTED GRADUATE RESEARCH (1-7)

Prerequisite: Classified status and consent of a faculty member who will serve as thesis advisor. A program of research conducted under the direction of the thesis advisor in an area of interest to the student. This course may be repeated but no more than seven units are allowed toward the MS degree.



CHEM 698A-C. THESIS (1-3)

Prerequisite: Classified standing and consent of advisor. For the MS degree: Thesis will include the preparation and writing of the master's thesis. The course may be repeated once but not more than three units are allowed towards the MS degree