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University Calendar

College of Social & Behavioral Sciences Calendar

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Tuesday, June 18, 2013

Image for Fantastic & Strange: Reflections of Self in Science Fiction Literature Fantastic & Strange: Reflections of Self in Science Fiction Literature

Tuesday, September 18 - Friday, July 26 All Day - Tseng Gallery, Oviatt Library
http://library.csun.edu/blogs/goingson/fantastic-strange/

Science fiction literature, one of the most popular and entertaining genres in modern fiction, has been read and loved by children and adults for decades. From the earliest pulp publications to modern masterpieces, science fiction short stories and novels have often functioned as a lens through which we express our sense of wonder, marvel at the possibilities of new technologies, and engage in our wildest imaginings. Join us as we celebrate the fantastic and strange in science fiction literature.

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Image for Applied Behavior Analysis Speaker SeriesApplied Behavior Analysis Speaker Series

4:00 pm - 6:00 pm - Whitsett Room, Sierra Hall 451

Please join the Psychology Department for the next talk in the Applied Behavior Analysis Speaker Series

Dr. Gina Green
Evidence-Based Practice: Implications for Behavior Analysts

Tuesday, June 18, 2013, 4:00 pm
Whitsett Room, Sierra Hall 451

Abstract: "Evidence-based practice" has become a popular buzz-phrase. Many groups have developed guidelines for treating various conditions that are described as "evidence-based," and that phrase is being used to market many interventions. Some laws and policies even mandate that practices be "evidence-based." This would seem to be a good thing for behavior analysts and consumers of behavior analytic services. But is it? Although "evidence-based practice" originally referred to practices that have proved effective in scientific studies, developers of some practice guidelines have defined "evidence" in a way that excludes most behavior analytic research. The implications of those definitions, the question of why the science of behavior analysis is ignored by so many guidelines developers, and what behavior analysts might do to remedy the situation are the topics of this presentation.

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